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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"



Annual Report 

of the 

Town of Chelmsford 




For the year ending December 3 1 , 2000 



Chelmsford Public Library 

25 Boston Road 
Chelmsford, MA 01824 



n ^V £5- 



GENERAL INFORMATION .. 3 (jq\\ 

Information 3 

Phone Directory 4 

Elected Officials 4/4/00 5 

Town Officials 6 f\t\f^\ 

Town Meeting Representatives 7 

Balance Sheet 13 



TOWN OFFICES , 14 

Board of Selectmen „ 14 

Town Manager 16 

Accounting Department 18 

Board Of Appeals 19 

Board Of Assessors 19 

Board Of Registrars 20 

Inspections Department 20 

Office Of Emergency Management 21 

Public Library 22 

Recreation Commission 23 

Recycling Committee 24 

Town Clerk 25 

Treasurer/ Tax Collector 25 

Sewer Commission 26 

PUBLIC SAFETY 28 

Police Department 28 

Fire Department 32 

Auxiliary Police 34 

Animal Control Officer 35 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ... 36 

Engineering Division 36 

Public Buildings Division 36 

Parks Division 37 

SewerDivision 38 

Highway Division 39 

EDUCATION „ 41 

Public Schools „ 41 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 44 

HUMAN SERVICES „. 47 

Council on Aging 47 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 48 

Veterans' Emergency Fund 49 

Veterans Services 49 

TOWN COMMITTEES & COMMISSIONS 51 

Arts & Technology Education Fund 51 

Celebrations Committee 52 

Cemetery Commission 52 

Commission On Disabilities 53 

Conservation Commission 55 

Cultural Council 56 

Finance Committee 57 

Historical Commission 58 

Historic District Commission 58 

1 



£000 



Holiday Decorating Committee 59 

Housing Authority 60 

Planning Board 61 

TOWN MEETINGS 63 

Special Town Meeting March 27, 2000 63 

Annual Town Meeting April 24, 2000 71 

Special Town Meeting April 24, 2000 74 

Adjourned Town Meeting April 27, 2000 80 

Annual Falltown Meeting October 16, 2000 87 

TOWN ELECTIONS 114 

Republican Primary Election March 4, 2000 1 14 

Democrat Primary Election March 4, 2000 115 

Libertarian Primary Election March 4, 2000 116 

Town Election April 4, 2000 117 

Republican State Primary September 19, 2000 118 

Democrat State Primary September 19, 2000 1 19 

Libertarian State Primary September 19, 2000 120 

State Election November 7, 2000 120 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Information 












Incorporated 


May, 1655 




Type of Government 


Sel / Town Mgr / Town Meeting 




Location 


Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the 
East, Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles 
from Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 


County 


Middlesex 




Land Area 


22.54 Square Miles 




Population 1995 


32,107 




Tax Rate 


($18.1 1 Residential and Commercial) 




U. S. Senators in Congress: 


5th Congressional District 


Martin Meehan, Lowell, MA 




State Senator 


Susan Fargo, Lincoln, MA 




Representative in General Court 


16th Middlesex District 


Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford, MA 




Accounting Department 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 


Assessors Office 


Monday 


8:30 a.m. -6:30 p.m.* 




Tuesday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 


Board of Health 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 


Building Department 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 


Highway Department 


Office 


Monday thru Friday 


7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 


Garage 


Monday thru Friday 


7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 


Public Libraries 


Adams Library 


Monday thru Thursday 


9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 




Friday & Saturday 


9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 




Sunday (Oct to May) 


1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 


McKay Library 


Monday & Wednesday 


11:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 




Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 


11:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 




Saturday 


10:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. 


School Superintendent 


Monday thru Friday 


8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 


Selectmen's Office 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 


Town Clerk 


Monday 


8:30 a.m. -6:30 p.m.* 




Tuesday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 


Tax Collector & Treasurer 


Monday 


8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.* 




Tuesday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 


Veterans' Agent Office 


Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 


8:30 a.m. -4:00 p.m. 



Meeting 


When 


Where 


Annual Town Election 


First Tuesday in April 


9 Precincts 


Annual Town Meeting 


Last Monday in April 


Senior Center 


Annual Town Meeting 


Third Monday in October 


Senior Center 


Selectmen 


7:00 p.m. - Every other Monday 


Town Offices 


School Committee 


7:30 p.m. - Every other Tuesday 


Parker School 


Planning Board 


7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Wednesday 


Town Offices 


Appeals Board 


7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Thursday 


Town Offices 


Conservation Commission 


8:00 p.m. - 1st & 3rd Tuesday 


Town Offices 


Board of Health 


5:00 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 


Town Offices 


Housing Authority 


7:30 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 


10 Wilson Street 



Phone Directory 



Accounting 250-5215 

Assessor 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

Building Inspector 250-5225 

Cemetery 250-5245 

Conservation Commission 250-5247 

Council on Aging 251-0533 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5267 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-5241 

Highway Department 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: 

Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 

Personnel 250-5288 

Planning Board 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) , 256-2361 

Post Office (North Chelmsford) 251-4461 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

School Administration 251-5100 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Town Manager 250-5201 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 250-5238 

Waste/Recycle 250-4203 

Water Department 

Chelmsford 256-2381 

East Water 453-0121 

North Water 251-3931 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 



Elected Officials 4/4/00 



CEMETERY COMMISSION (3 yr Term - elected) 
Gerald L. Hardy 1 1 Meehan Drive 

James F. Dolan 106 Middlesex Street 

Jean R. McCaffery Chr 20 1 Old Westford Rd. 



CONSTABLE 

William E. Spence 



(3 yr Term - elected) 
91 Billerica Road 



BOARD OF HEALTH (3 yr Term - elected) 

Earnest Wu 255 North Rd #28 

Peter Dulchinos Chr 17 Spaulding Road 

Douglas E. Hausler VChr 51 Stonegate Road 

Paul J. Canniff Clerk RESIGNED Effective 6/16/00 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



(5 yr Term - elected) 



Leonard E. Westgate 
Lynn M. Marcella VChr 
Scott Johnson Chr 
Pamela TurnbuU 
Denise Marcaurelle 

LD3RARY TRUSTEES 

John W. Cutter, Jr. Tres 
Steven P.L. Maloney 
Margaret E. Marshall 
Elizabeth A. McCarthy VChr 
Richard E. DeFreitas 
Carol L. Sneden 
Stephen J. Mallette Chr 

MODERATOR 

Dennis E. McHugh 



PLANNING BOARD 

Charles Wojtas Clerk 
Susan E. Carter VChr 
Robert C. Morse 
Christopher Garrahan Chr 
Pamela L. Armstrong 
Kim J. MacKenzie 
James P. Good 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Mary Jo Griffin, Chr 
Evelyn S. Thoren, 
Judith B. Mallette, VChr 
Sheila E. Pichette 
James B. Trager, Sec 

SELECTMEN 

Thomas E. Moran,VChr 
Michael F. McCall, Clerk 
Stuart G. Weisfeldt, 



7 Wildes Rd 

74 Carlisle Street 

25 Samuel Road 

535 Wellman Avenue (Govnr Appt) 

7 Whippletree Rd 



(3yrTerm - elected) 

38 Abbott Lane 

10 King St 

2 Draycoach Drive 

48 Bartlett Street 

61 St Andrews Way 

4 Laredo Dr 

13 Wedgewood Drive 

(3 yr Term - elected) 

63 Dalton Road 

2 Chelmsford Street (office) 

(3 yr Term - elected) 
24 Elm Street 
47 Kennedy Drive 
45 Clarissa Road 
4 Maynard Circle 
15 Amble Rd 
101 High Street 
4 Burning Tree Lane 

_(3 yr Term - elected) 
125 Stedman Street 

18 Pine odRoad 
13 Wedgewood Drive 
26 Shedd Lane 

203 Concord Rd 

(3 yr Term - elected) 

19 Dennison Road 
151 Main Street 

8 Leitrim Lane 



256-6717 


2001 


251-3105 


2002 


256-5333 


2003 


256-4581 


2001 


256-8976 


2001 


256-5256 


2002 


256-8194 


2003 


256-3796 


2001 


458-6807 


2002 


256-3205 


2003 


251-4778 


7/03 


256-0942 


2005 


256-6602 


2001 


256-8538 


2001 


251-1296 


2002 


256-6871 


2002 


251-9866 


2002 


256-2327 


2003 


250-0260 


2003 


256-6842 


2002 


256-3330 




256-9089 


2001 


251-4374 


2001 


256-5147 


2002 


251-3673 


2002 


256-8767 


2003 


256-4088 


2003 


256-2686 


2003 


244-5212 


2001 


256-1122 


2001 


250-0260 


2002 


452-5919 


2002 


256-0371 


2003 


251-4173 


2001 


251-3157 


2001 


256-7902 


2002 



William F. Dalton 
Philip M. Eliopoulos, Chr 

SEWER COMMISSION 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Chr 
Barry B. Balan VChr 
John F. Souza 
Richard J. Day 
George F. Abely Clerk 



12 Dartmouth Street 


251-3259 


2003 


26 Arbutus Ave. 


256-2388 


2003 


(3 yr Term - elected) 






8 Loiselle Lane 


251-3654 


2001 


54 Boston Road #10 


256-8234 


2001 


123 Stedman St 


256-6478 


2002 


6 Merilda Avenue 


251-3382 


2002 


87 Swain Road 


251-8472 


2003 



Town Officials 




TOWN MANAGER 


Bernard F. Lynch 


250-5201 


TOWN CLERK 


Mary E. St.Hilaire 


250-5205 


FINANCE DIRECTOR/ 

TREASURER/ 

TAX COLLECTOR 


Charles F. Mansfield 


250-5210 


TOWN ACCOUNTANT 


Jean D. Sullivan 


250-5215 


BOARD OF ASSESSORS 


Diane M. Phillips 


250-5220 




Bruce Symmes 




BUILDING INSPECTOR 


Anthony F. Zagzoug 


250-5225 


DPW DIRECTOR 


James E. Pearson 


250-5228 


POLICE CHIEF 


Raymond G. McCusker Jr 


250-5255 


FIRE CHIEF 


John E. Parow 


250-5267 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Clare L. Jeannotte.Chr 






Dwight M. Hayward 






William Curry 






Samuel P. Chase 






Mary E. Frantz 






William J. Gilet, Jr 






Eugene T. Schwamb III 





Town Meeting Representatives 



PRE TERM NAME 

2003 James P. Good 

2003 Peggy Dunn 

2003 Anthony V. Volpe 

2003 Frances T. McDougall 

2003 Jean B. Rook 

2003 Nina S. Lewin 

2003 vacancy will be filled at the 4/3/01 election 



2002 Marian D. Currier 
2002 Elizabeth A. McCarthy 
2002 Barry B. Balan 
2002 Nancy H. Robinson 
2002 Cynthia J. Kaplan 
2002 Sandra A. Kilburn 

2001 William E. Spence 
2001 Steven P.L. Maloney 
2001KathrynBrough 
2001 Samuel P.Chase 
2001 Sandra B. Martinez 
2001 Richard G. Allison 



2 2003 William F. Dalton 

2 2003 Francis G. Miskell 

2 2003 Bruce J. Harper Sr 

2 2003 Linda H. Dalton 

2 2003 M. Janice Spence 

2 2003 Kathleen M. Heald 



ADDRESS 


PHONE 


removed 1/26/01 




2 Bridge St 


250-8095 


144 Warren Ave 


250-8548 


1 1 Dawn Dr 


256-0350 


41 Westford St 


256-3164 


1 Boyds Ln 


256-4701 



181 Littleton Rd #404 


256-6115 


48 Bartlett St 


256-6871 


54 Boston Rd 


256-8234 


45 Billerica Rd 


256-6331 


22 Bartlett St 


256-4741 


181 Littleton Rd 8-217 


256-2783 


91 Billerica Rd 


256-4581 


10 King St 


256-8538 


14 High St 


256-8019 


5 Rivermeadow Dr 


256-5617 


1 Carter Dr 


256-7943 


189 Littleton Rd #48 


256-3395 


12 Dartmouth St 


251-3259 


38 Groton Rd 


251-3376 


9 Harvard St 


251-4243 


12 Dartmouth St 


251-3259 


816 Wellman Ave 


251-8645 


848 Wellman Ave 


251-9963 



2 2002 Phyllis H. Clark 

2 2002 George L. Merrill 

2 2002 Susan E. Carter 

2 2002 Mark T. Connors 

2 2002 John W. Thompson 

2 2002 Charles B. Austin 

2 2001 Mary Jo Welch 

2 2001 Jeffrey W. Stallard 

2 2001 Douglas R.Aker 

2 2001 Stanley W. Norkunas 

2 2001 Pamela H. Pudsey 

2 2001 Karen E. Connors 

3 2003 Michael F. McCall 

3 2003 Cathy A. Hutchinson 

3 2003 Christopher T. Garrahan 

3 2003 William J. Gilet, Jr 

3 2003 Harold I. Matzkin 

3 2003 Kathryn M. Fisher 

3 2002 D. Lorraine Lambert 

3 2002 Michael F. Curran 

3 2002 Shaun F. Saber* 

3 2002 Jaclyn D. Matzkin 

3 2002 Bruce R. Wolf 

3 2002 Adrienne M. Jerome 

3 2002 Susan M. Olsen 

3 2001 John P. Emerson, Jr. 

3 2001 Carol W. Merriam 

3 2001 Thomas E. Moran 

3 2001 Henry R. McEnany 

3 2001 Nancy J. Knight 



1 1 Sharon Ave 


251-3180 


108 Dunstable Rd 


251-3606 


47 Kennedy Dr 


251-4374 


61 Dunstable Rd 


251-3435 


14 Arbor Rd 


251-7146 


876 Wellman Ave 


251-9942 


31 Kennedy Dr 


251-3760 


103Tyngsboro Rd PO 2004 


251-0389 


12 Arbor Rd 


251-7115 


58 Church St 


251-4680 


48 A Dunstable Rd 


251-0930 


61 Dunstable Rd 


251-3435 


151 Main St 


251-3157 


233 Main St 


251-7846 


4 Maynard Circle 


251-3673 


71 Princeton St #113 


251-3704 


E24 Scotty Hollow Dr 


251-8974 


2 Kelshill Rd 


251-4835 


91 Main St 


251-2844 


58 Crooked Spring Rd 


251-8038 


32 Hatikva Way 


251-0510 


E24 Scotty Hollow Dr 


251-8974 


12 Hatikva Way 


251-9841 


118 Crooked Spring Rd 


251-4199 


removed 1/24/01 




8 Loiselle Ln 


251-3654 


8 Lovett Ln 


251-8396 


19DennisonRd 


251-4173 


Bl 8 Scotty Hollow Dr 


251-8446 


29 Stonehill Rd 


251-3103 



3 2001 H. Steve Flynn 



13 Dayton St 



251-8486 



4 


2003 Sheila E. Pichette 


26 Shedd Ln 


452-5919 


4 


2003 George A. Ripsom, Sr. 


33 Porter Rd 


250-9210 


4 


2003 Billy L. Martin 


9 Vincent St 


256-3092 


4 


2003 Dennis P. Sheehan 


61 Moore St 


459-3654 


4 


2003 Richard R. Madanjian 


46 Moore St 


455-3030 


4 


2003 Elizabeth M. Ripsom 


33 Porter Rd 


250-9210 


4 


2002 Scott E. Johnson 


25 Samuel Rd 


256-3205 


4 


2002 Kathleen M. Redican 


80 Carlisle St 


937-1168 


4 


2002 Brian P. Latina 


15 Jessie Rd 


256-0721 


4 


2002 John G. Coppinger 


20 Ansie Rd 


256-8763 


4 


2002 Roger C. Sumner 


40 Kensington Dr 


256-7008 


4 


2002 Mark A. House 


12 Donald Ave 


452-3037 


4 


2001 John B.SousaJr 


88 Carlisle St 


937-2667 


4 


2001 Daniel J. Sullivan, IE 


4 Shedd Lane 


453-3813 


4 


2001 Cathleen H. Latina 


15 Jessie Rd 


256-0721 


4 


2001 Helen A. Manahan 


26 Muriel Rd 


256-7398 


4 


2001 John R.Hibbard 


50 Manning Rd 


452-7731 


4 


2001 Raymonde R. Legrand 


20 Oak Knoll Ave 


453-4304 


5 


2003 Cheryl M. Perkins 


10 Warwick Dr 


250-4123 


5 


2003 Evelyn S. Thoren 


18PinewoodRd 


256-1482 


5 


2003 David P. McLaughlin 


110 Garrison Rd 


256-8611 


5 


2003 Glenn R. Thoren 


18PinewoodRd 


256-1482 


5 


2003 Robert D.Hall 


35 Maple Rd 


256-9159 


5 


2003 Judith B. Mallette 


13 Wedgewood Dr 


250-0260 


5 


2002 Kathleen Curran 


5 Kenwood St 


256-2423 


5 


2002 Wendy C. Marcks 


13 Dakota Rd 


256-8307 


5 


2002 Bonnie G. Wilder 


3 Higate Rd 


256-8628 


5 


2002 John W. Wilder 


3 Higate Rd 


256-8628 



5 2002 Stephen J. Mallette 

5 2002 Beverly A. Barrett 

5 2001 W. Allen Thomas, Jr. 

5 2001 Jonathan A. Stevens 

5 2001 Dean Carmeris 

5 2001 Leonard R. Richards, Jr 

5 2001 Frederick S. Marcks 

5 2001 Dennis T. Bak 

6 2003 Judith A. Olsson 

6 2003 Stuart G. Weisfeldt 

6 2003 David J. McLachlan 

6 2003 Marianne J. Paresky 

6 2003 M. Elizabeth Marshall 

6 2003 Norman J. Aubert, Jr 

6 2002 Mary E. Frantz 

6 2002 Mary Jo Griffin 

6 2002 Peter V. Lawlor 

6 2002 Daniel E. Lekas 

6 2002 Charles F. Smith * 

6 2002 Ralph M.Nebalski 

6 2002 Howard J. Hall 

6 2001 Susan Kupor McHugh 

6 2001 Janet G. Dubner 

6 2001 George T. Chianis 

6 2001 Nancy W.Kaelin 

6 2001 Angelo J. Taranto, Jr 

6 2001 Pamela H. McKenna 

7 2003 Kevin E. Porter 
7 2003 Donna L. Ready 



13 WedgewoodDr 


250-0260 


3 Delpha Ln 


250-0396 


374 Littleton Rd 


256-8772 


RESIGNED 7/5/00 




20 Higate Rd 


256-1480 


2HartRd 


256-1532 


13 Dakota Dr 


256-8307 


16PinewoodRd 


256-7438 


8 Scott Dr 


256-9650 


8 Leitrim Ln 


256-7902 


51 Brentwood Rd 


256-7272 


10 Smith St 


256-8292 


16 Colonial Dr 


256-5852 


14 Hidden Way 


250-4447 


34 Miland Ave 


256-1612 


125 Stedman St 


244-1122 


50 Dalton Rd 


256-7275 


RESIGNED 10/11/00 




6 Scott Dr 


256-0105 


10 Sunset Ave 


256-9166 


5 Hillcrest Dr 


256-7723 


63 Dalton Rd 


256-6842 


46 Dalton Rd 


256-8216 


273 Chelmsford St 


256-6936 


22 Fairbanks Rd 


256-4438 


1 1 Woodlawn Ave 


256-8146 


60 Hornbeam Hill Rd 


256-3289 


48 Abbott Lane 


250-7478 


2 Abbott Ln 


256-8679 



10 



7 


2003 Barbara J. Scavezze 


3 Mt Laurel DrPO Box 495 


256-5427 


7 


2003 Leonard W. Doolan, IE 


52 Amble Rd 


256-3604 


7 


2003 Dwight M. Hayward 


59 Amble Rd 


256-3177 


7 


2003 Carol A. Stark 


4 Hostler Rd 


256-5266 


7 


2002 Kathleen S. Fitzpatrick 


15 Footpath Rd 


251-3596 


7 


2002 Dennis J. Ready 


2 Abbott Ln 


256-8679 


7 


2002 Katherine C. Harbison 


3 Thoreau Dr 


256-5027 


7 


2002 Bernard A. Ready 


31 Clover Hill Dr 


256-6058 


7 


2002 Robert F. Sullebarger 


46 Chestnut Hill Rd 


250-3983 


7 


2002 Judith Hass 


27 Mcintosh Rd 


256-4230 


7 


2001 Paul F. Gleason 


30 Pine Hill Rd 


256-3108 


7 


2001 Linda G. Morabito 


28 Clover Hill Dr 


256-6418 


7 


2001 Pamela L. Armstrong 


15 Amble Rd 


256-8767 


7 


2001 Peter Dulchinos 


17SpauldingRd 


256-5256 


7 


2001 Clare L. Jeannotte 


3 Hawthorne Ln 


250-9407 


7 


2001 Joseph D. Ready 


2 Abbott Ln 


256-8679 


8 


2003 Richard MJohnson 


237 Old Westford Rd 


250-4650 


8 


2003 Alexander W. Gervais 


5 Arbutus Ave 


256-2584 


8 


2003 Linda M. Lee 


255 North Rd #263 


256-6840 


8 


2003 John S. Fudge, Jr. 


255 North Rd #8 


256-5465 


8 


2003 S. George Zaharoolis 


191 Princeton St 


251-4434 


8 


2003 Deborah Villano 


10 Gregory Rd 


250-8082 


8 


2002 Margaret A. Fudge 


255 North Rd #8 


256-5465 


8 


2002 Walter A. Cleven 


4 Arbutus Ave 


256-5043 


8 


2002 Ralph J. Hulslander, Jr. 


74 Smith St 


256-6905 


8 


2002 Jennifer Renna Ferreira 


11 Garland Rd 


256-1056 


8 


2002 Richard J. Day 


6 Merilda Ave 


251-3382 


8 


2002 Gail E. Poulten 


16 Berkeley Dr 


251-8813 



8 2001 Angelo J. Taranto 



11 



8 Charlemont Ct 



251-8205 



8 2001 William C. Curry 

8 2001 Joyce E. Johnson 

8 2001 Jacqueline A. Sheehy 

8 2001 John E.Abbott 

8 2001 Samuel Poulten* 

8 2001 Kathleen E. Howe 



15 Overlook Dr 256-7879 
237 Old Westford Rd 250-4650 
removed 1/24/01 

384 North Rd 251-8881 

16 Berkeley Dr 251-8813 
moved 7/24/00 then resigned 12/18/00 



9 2003 Robert C. Morse 

9 2003 Susan B. Graves 

9 2003 C. Thomas Christiano 

9 2003 Leonard E. Westgate 

9 2003 Robert P. Mackey 

9 2003 James L. Hickey 

9 2002 Barry K. Hamill 

9 2002 James E. Rich 

9 2002 John G. Harrington 

9 2002 J. Stephen Clark 

9 2002 Arthur Carmen 

9 2002 James W. Young 

9 2001 Francis J. Barre 

9 2001 Will L. Perry 

9 2001 Phyllis M. Elias 

9 2001 Gary A. Mathews 

9 2001 Lesley M. Mathews 

9 2001 Thomas A. Newcomb 



45 Clarissa Rd 


256-5147 


17 Clarissa Rd 


256-6241 


6 Drew Cir 


256-2181 


7 Wildes Rd 


256-3796 


47 Old Stage Rd 


2441269 


104 Kristin Dr Ext 


250-4761 


55 Clarissa Rd 


256-0767 


39 Clarissa Rd 


256-7201 


149 Boston Rd 


256-8249 


1 1 Smokerise Dr 


256-5284 


6 Howard Rd 


250-8435 




(u) 


39 Cambridge St 


250-8176 


3 Sandra Dr 


256-3942 


42 Concord Rd 


256-4492 


28 Regina Dr 


256-7570 


19 Clarissa Rd 


250-9669 


19 Clarissa Rd 


250-9669 


9 Clarissa Rd 


256-4748 



12 



Balance Sheet 





Governmental Fund Types 




Fiduciary 
Fund Types 


Account 
Group 


Totals 

(Memorandum 

Only) 


Assets: 


General 


Special 
Revenue 


Capital Projects Trust & 
Agency 


Long Term 
Obligations 


June 30, 2000 


















Cash 


$ 3,605,979 


$ 5,295,893 


$ 




$ 1,594,888 


$ 


$ 10,496,760 


















Investments 


2,594,090 


- 


3,405,910- 




7,569,941 


- 


13,569,941 




- 


- 


- 


























Property Tax Receivable: 
















Current Year 


448,286 


- 


- 




- 


- 


448,286 


















Other Accounts Receivable: 
















Motor Vehicle Excise 


483,342 


- 


- 




- 


- 


483,342 


Tax Liens 


645,148 


- 


- 




- 


- 


645,148 


Sewer 


93,185 


- 


- 




- 


- 


93,185 


Special Assessments 


- 


2,432,289 


- 




- 


- 


2,432,289 


Departmental 


451 




- 




49,909 


- 


50,360 


Intergovernmental 


7,565 


275,714 


661,801 




- 


- 


945,080 


















Other Assets 


139,129 


- 


- 




477,000 


- 


616,129 


Amounts to be Provided for retirement of Long 
Term Obligations 


. 


. 


. 




- 


53.645.629 


53.645.629 






























Total Assets 


$ 8,017,175 


$ 8.003.896 


$ 4.067,711 




$9,691,738 


$ 53.645.629 


$ 83,426,149 




















Governmental Fund Types 




Fiduciary 
Fund Types 


Account 
Group 


Totals 

(Memorandum 

Only) 


Liabilities: 


General 


Special 
Revenue 


Capital Projects Trust & 
Agency 


Long Term 
Obligations 


June 30, 1999 


















Accounts Payable 


$ 668,286 


$ 105,421 


$ 19,356 




$ 1,212,730 


$ 


$ 2,005,793 


Payroll Withholdings 


273,574 


- 


- 




- 


- 


273,574 


Other Liabilities 


68,565 


- 


- 




484,115 


- 


552,680 


Deferred Revenue 


1,691,711 


2,432,289 






- 


- 


552,680 


Court Judgement Payable 


- 


- 


- 




- 


90,559 


90,559 


Accrued Compensated Absences 


- 


- 


- 




- 


4,358,467 


4,358,467 


Bonds and Notes Payable 


- 


- 


8.250,000 




- 


49.196.603 


57.446.603 


















Total Liabilities 


2.702.136 


2,537.710 


8.269.356 




1.696,845 


53.645.629 


68.851.676 


















Fund Equity: 
















Fund Balances: 
















Reserved: 
















Encumbrances 


894,868 


- 


- 




- 


- 


894,868 


Endowments 


- 


- 


- 




802,345 


- 


802,345 


Unreserved: 
















Designated 


358,666 


5,466,186 


(4,201,645) 




7,192,548 


- 


8,815,755 


Undesignated 


4.061.505 


- 


- 




- 


- 


4.061.505 


















Total Fund Equity 


5.315.0 


5.466.186 


f4.201.645) 




7,994.893 


- 


14.574.473 


















Total Liabilities and Fund Equity 


$8,017,175 


$8,003,896 


$4,067,711 




$9,691,738 


$53,645,629 


$83,426,149 



13 



TOWN OFFICES 



Board of Selectmen 



It is with great pride that I write this favorable report on behalf of the Chelmsford Board of 
Selectmen for the Town of Chelmsford's 2000 Annual Report. As outlined below, 2000 was full 
of accomplishments and activities that have improved both the financial strength of the Town as 
well as the quality of life for our community. After you finish reading this report, I am sure you 
will agree that it was a great year for our Town. 

With the election of April 2000, 1 was thankfully re-elected for a second term on the Board of 
Selectmen and honored to serve as Chairman. It has been a pleasure to serve with my 
colleagues, and I thank them for all their effort, dedication and professionalism in conducting 
matters of the Town in the past year. This was a direct factor in all that has been accomplished. 

During my term as Chairman, and together with the efforts of numerous town officials, many 
aspects of our town were improved; the tax rate for FY 2000 was decreased - the fourth 
consecutive decrease since I was first elected to the Board in 1997; we received grant money for 
numerous Town projects and traffic improvements, including nearly $1.4 million to signalize the 
intersections of North Road and Dalton Road and at North Road, Parkhurst and Davis Roads, 
along with initiating the engineering for the signalization at Route 129 and Golden Cove Road; 
the stabilization fund grew to approximately $7.5 million which continues to be a strong factor in 
maintaining the Town's superb bond rating; and we have made major improvements to our Town 
facilities, infrastructure and recreational parks, including the opening of the renovated/expanded 
Adams Library, the new skateboard park, and improved tennis/basketball courts at the McCarthy 
School, and sidewalk installations, to name a few. 

After years of lobbying the State, the Route 3 widening project finally came off the ground. This 
project will be one of the most important capital improvements to this region in decades, 
benefiting the residents of the corridor, the business community and users of the highway alike. 
This region, along with the rest of the Commonwealth, has experienced one of the strongest 
economic growths in recent history. What that growth has meant for communities like 
Chelmsford is a significant increase in our commercial and industrial development. However, 
without the appropriate infrastructure to support this growth, our communities have also 
experienced severe increases in traffic. The Route 3 work guarantees the long-term viability for 
this region as well as improves the quality of life for our residents and businesses. We continue 
to work with the State and the contractor to minimize the impact on our residents abutting the 
highway. 



14 



Although we have experienced many positive improvements for our Town, our vigilance is still 
needed in several areas. We must continue to be fiscally sound to maintain our superb bond 
rating while also being more fiscally conservative in light of the recent slow down in the 
economy. We must continue to lobby the Commonwealth for increases in school aid. We must 
see the Center Signalization and Beautification project completed to enhance our Town center 
and eliminate traffic and safety concerns. We must look after our senior citizens and provide 
additional affordable housing for them so they do not spend years on our housing list. We must 
be pro-active in trying to minimize the impact on our community from the Route 3 Project. 
Finally, we must work aggressively to ensure that the needed renovations to our school buildings 
are met in the most economical manner while balancing the long term needs of the entire 
community. 

I would be remiss if I did not thank the other members of the Board of Selectmen for their 
dedication to the Town. I also want to thank the Town Manager, Bernie Lynch, for his efforts 
and support along with the staff of the Manager's Office: Assistant Town Manager John 
Coderre, Janet Murphy, Marian Currier and Jeanne Parziale. Most importantly, I would like to 
thank the people of Chelmsford for allowing me the opportunity to serve as a Selectman, a 
position that I have found extremely rewarding. I will continue to work on your behalf to make 
Chelmsford one of the finest communities in the Commonwealth. 




Board of Selectmen 

Philip Eliopoulos, Michael McCall, Thomas Moran, William Dalton, Stuart Weisfeldt 



15 



Town Manager 



I am pleased to present the Annual Report of the Town Manager for the year ending December 
31, 2000. I once again can report that this past year was a positive one for the Town of 
Chelmsford with stable finances and progress in improving our services and facilities. As in the 
past I point to the decisions that we have made in the past as the foundation for our present 
condition. These prior decisions have been based upon conservative financial management and 
strategic investments to address identified and well-established community needs. These 
principles should continue to guide us as we move forward with the distinct possibility that the 
overall economy will not be as strong as it has been over the past few years. Fortunately, 
because of our adherence to these principles we are in a far better position to weather a 
weakening economy than we were in the late 1980's and early 1990's. 

I have listed some of the highlights of 2000 below: 

• At the close of FY2000 we were able to certify $1.96 million in free cash, or budget 
surplus. Use of these funds included $750,000 for tax relief and $1,000,000 for our 
stabilization fund, which now has a balance of approximately $7.5 million. 

• In February we were able to open our enlarged and improved Adams Library. This 
facility, which is long overdue for our community, should serve our needs for the next 
20-30 years. 

• In April the Town Meeting approved the Town's commitment to an improvement and 
expansion of the Nashoba Technical High School. This school serves an important 
role in providing vocational education to over 100 Chelmsford students each year. 



• 



After years of lobbying by local officials the Commonwealth moved forward with at 
Rt. 3 widening project using an innovative method of financing and design/build 
construction. The project will be completed over the next three years and will 
adversely impact the Town's traffic for that period. However, in the end there is little 
doubt that an enlarged roadway will reduce traffic congestion within the Town and 
produce opportunities for managed economic development. The Town has also 
worked with the state to locate sound barriers at several locations along the Rt. 3 
corridor and received a commitment from the state to do further noise studies at 
several other locations for the purpose of obtaining additional barriers. 

Through the efforts of Senator Susan Fargo and Representative Carol Cleven the state 
committed nearly $1.4 million of transportation monies to make intersection 
improvements on North Road at Dalton Road, and at Davis Road/Parkhurst Road. 
These improvements, which include traffic signals, should be completed in the next 
24 months. 

The Town has begun working with our neighboring communities and state and 
regional agencies on a proposed jwell to Nashua train service. In conjunction with 
the service we are working on the possible location of a station in the North 
Chelmsford area. All of these actions are in follow-up to a well-attended community 
meeting held in July. 



16 



• During the summer the Town finished construction of its long awaited skateboard 
park adjacent to the McCarthy Middle School. The first few months were not without 
issues of implementing rules of use and staffing but generally, the project was well 
received by residents and the youth of the Town. In tandem with the construction of 
this facility the Town also rebuilt the tennis and basketball courts at the South Row 
school. 

• During the year we completed a study of the water system in the Town and of our 
Department of Public Works. We received a great deal of information and ideas 
about our water distribution system and our future needs however, more work will 
need to be done in this area which involves the three independent water districts that 
serve the Town. Our DPW study determined that generally our infrastructure is being 
well managed but that increased demands necessitate better staffing, centralized and 
enlarged facilities, and improved systems and procedures. These recommendations 
will be implemented over the next 3 years. 

The year was not without issues of a less positive nature as the Central Square project, which 
includes traffic, and aesthetic improvements that did not begin as hoped during the year. It now 
appears that this project will begin in late summer 2001. Likewise, the building of the new 
Police Station on Old North Road is being redesigned after receiving bids in excess of available 
funds. Finally, negotiations with the cable company RCN ended during 2000 without a contract, 
as the company was experiencing financial and organizational issues which prevented their 
moving forward to provide an alternative service. 

As we move forward into 2001 we will continue to push forward with projects such as Central 
Square, the Police Station and the North Road traffic improvements. We will also continue to 
work with the School Department to address our facility needs. This issue hangs on the horizon 
as a large cost that will require voter support for a Proposition 2-Vi exemption. We will also 
need to continue to plan out our financial future in light of the slowing economy, a state tax cut 
that may reduce aid to cities and towns, and fixed cost issues such as health insurance for our 
employees which is increasing at levels well beyond revenue growth. These challenges await us 
in the months ahead. 

As always, I want to thank the members of the Board of Selectmen for their direction and 
support during 2000 including Bill Dalton, Philip Eliopoulos, Michael McCall, Thomas Moran 
and Stuart Weisfeldt. I also want to recognize and thank the Department managers and town 
employees for their dedication and efforts. In particular, I want to thank the staff of the 
Executive Office, which has included John Coderre, Janet Murphy, Marian Currier and Jeanne 
Parziale. 

In closing, let me once again thank all of the citizens of Chelmsford for the opportunity to work 
on your behalf as your Town Manager. I look forward to continuing the direction in which we 
are heading in making Chelmsford an even better community. 



17 



Accounting Department 



Members: 

Jean Sullivan 
Darlene Lussier 
Patricia Tucker 
Kimberly McCarthy 



Town Accountant 

Assistant to the Town Accountant 

Principal Clerk 

Payroll Coordinator 



During the fiscal year 2000, the Accounting Department continued to closely work with all 
departments in the processing of vendor/employee payments in a timely manner and within 
approved budget constraints. 

The measure of success within the Accounting Department is recognized by the continual 
excellent reviews received for the Certified Public Accounting firm. 




18 



Board of Appeals 

Back Row William Gilet (Alternate), Ronald Pare', John Blake (Alternate), 
Daniel Wilkins (Alternate), John Coppinger 

Front Row Gustave Fallgren, Harold Organ, Eileen Duffy, 

Kathryn Bianchi (Community Development Clerk) 



Board Of Appeals 



Members: 

Harold Organ, Jr., Chairman 
John Coppinger, Vice Chairman 
Eileen Duffy 
Gustave Fallgren 



Ronald Pare' 
John Blake, Alternate 
Daniel Wilkins, Alternate 
Kathryn Bianchi, Principal Clerk 



The Board of Appeals saw a slight decrease in the number of applications compared to the last 
two years. However, with the value of land increasing and the extension of sewers making more 
land buildable, the Board is seeing continuing pressure to grant Variances on land otherwise 
unsuitable for development. This is a trend that is likely to continue into the foreseeable future. 
The Board also welcomed Daniel Wilkins as an Alternate Member to the Board, replacing Katie 
Roark. 

Total Granted Denied Withdrawn 

Variances 37 27 8 2 

Special Permits 15 13 1 1 

Comprehensive Permit* 110 

Total 53 41 9 3 

♦Modification of a Comprehensive Permit 



Board Of Assessors 



MEMBERS 



Diane Phillips 
Frank Reen 

Nancy Maher 
Elaine McBride 
Elaine Myers 



Chief Assessor 
Ass't Assessor 
Admin. Ass't 
Prin. Clerk 
Prin. Clerk 



The Board of Assessors conducted the state mandated three year revaluation for FY2001. The 
escalating real estate market resulted in increases to value of 12 to 40% depending on the 
different types of property. 

The office has a new Assistant Assessor. Frank Reen replaces Eric Josephson who is now the 
new Assessor in the Town of Weston. Eric started in Chelmsford in September of 1993. 

The Board wishes to thank our staff, Nancy Maher, Elaine McBride, Elaine Myers for their 
continued dedication. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Diane Phillips, MAA, Chairman 

Bruce A. Symmes, CMA, RMA, MAA 



19 



Board Of Registrars 



Judith A. Olsson 

Richard F. Burtt, Chairman 

Martha D. Doukszewicz 

Sandra A. Kilburn, Departmental Assistant 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Ex Officio 

Voting Strength as of December 31, 2000 Enrolled Voters: 



Department Personnel 

Anthony F. Zagzoug, Inspector of Buildings 

Joseph P. Shaw, Local Inspector 

Kenneth W. Kleynen, Plumbing & Gas Inspector 

Dennis P. Kane, Wire Inspector 

Denise Cote, Department Assistant 



Precincts 


I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


TOTAL 


Democrats 


658 


631 


633 


614 


622 


661 


553 


646 


542 


5560 


Republicans 


419 


298 


336 


354 


428 


385 


385 


378 


400 


3383 


Unenrolled 


1423 


1233 


1582 


1297 


1532 


1527 


1486 


1365 


1427 


12872 


Libertarian 


4 


12 


6 


11 


12 


7 


4 


14 


12 


82 


Inter. 3rd 
Party 


1 


2 


, 1 


3 


4 


2 


2 


3 





18 


Reform 





4 





2 





1 


1 


3 


1 


12 


Rainbow 
Coalition 


2 





1 














1 





4 


Socialist 











1 














1 


2 


Greenparty 
USA 























1 





1 


Mass Green 
Party 

















2 











2 


TOTAL 


2507 


2180 


2559 


2282 


2598 


2585 


2431 


2411 


2383 


21936 




Inspection: 


s Depa 


rtment 



















The Inspections Department has been very busy enforcing Town and State Building Codes, 
handicap accesses/compliance, home occupations, signs, code and zoning regulations. 

There were 30 new single family dwellings, 3 multi-family dwellings, and 1 1 new commercial 
buildings 

20 



Type of Permit 


Permits Issued 


Total Fees 


Building Permits 


791 


$439,077.70 


Wire Permits 


917 


$65,071.00 


Plumbing & Gas Permits 


975 


$24,517.00 


Total 


2,683 


$528,676.70 



Other fees (not included above) for weights and measures, yard sales, signs and Certificates of 
Inspection were $7500.50. Total fees collected by the Inspections Department for FY2000 was 
$536,177.20. 



I would like to thank all of the personnel in the Inspections Department, and all other Town 
personnel for their cooperation and support during the year. 



Office Of Emergency Management 



Walter R. Hedlund, Director 
John E. Abbott 
Walter J. Adley, Jr. 



J. Bradford Cole 
Paul Eriksen 
Stephen J. Maffetone 



Chelmsford Emergency Management Agency (CEMA) volunteers have been active during the 
year 2000, preparing reports for FEMA and Mass. Emergency Management Agency (MEMA). 



Three members attended a Three Day Mass. Emergency Management 2000 Conference in 
Marlboro, Topics were- Weather Related information, Terrorism, School all Hazard 
Preparedness, etc. 



CEMA members wish to thank all Department Heads, Board of Selectmen, Town Manager and 
all their personnel for their efforts and assistance. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



21 



Public Library 



Chelmsford Public Library Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 

25 Boston Road 43 Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

Stephen Mallette, Chair Richard DeFreitas 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Vice-Chair Steven Maloney 

Carol Sneden, Secretary Margaret Marshall 

John Cutter, Treasurer 

The library began a new chapter in its 105 year history, when it reopened the newly renovated 
and expanded Adams Library on February 29, 2000. Hundreds of residents, Town Officials, 
Trustees, and staff joined the celebration at the official grand opening and ribbon cutting on 
March 26, 2001. 

Circulation and Reference 

During 2000, residents also used the library more than ever before in its 105 year history. They 
borrowed 391,534 items including 10,678 interlibrary loans. The reference department 
documented 12,950 walk-in and telephone reference transactions. Electronic resources and 
access continued to expand. Registered borrowers can now log in from outside the library. 
Residents logged and conducted 28, 037 searches and retrieved 7,617 full text articles using on- 
line periodical indexes and databases. 

Community Services. 

Katherine Cryan-Hicks, Head of Community Services, offered residents 58 programs that were 
attended by 2,311 adults. Programs included Poetry Slams, Music on the Lawn, First Sundays 
Musical Series, information programs on many diverse subjects. In April the first Poetry 
Festival was held to celebrate National Poetry Month. Hundreds of job seekers visited the 
library during the annual Summer Job Fair in March. Community Services supports the 24 
Relay Challenge and participates in other community activities. 

Children's Department 

The Children's staff offered 176 programs during the year that were attended by 3,532 children. 
The Friends of the Library sponsored programs during school vacations and summer reading. 
Two grants were awarded to the Children's Library to develop special pre-school collections and 
to offer varied programming. 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 

The MacKay Library staff offered 147 programs that were attended by 1,526 children. In 
addition 189 adults attended 30 book discussions. Program included story/craft times, Harry 
Potter workshops, Flying Pigs Children's book group and a birthday party for Dr. Seuss. There 
were 179 participants in the Summer Read„.g Program. The MacKay Library expanded hours 
during the months of January and February because the main library was closed while staff 
prepared to move into the new building. 



22 



The Friends of the Library 

The Friends of the Library (Marti Michaud, President) continued support for the library, its 
programs and services throughout the year. Their support enhances library services by funding 
programming, museum passes, and equipment. The first booksale in 3 years was held in 
September at the gym in the lower level of the Town Offices. The Friends also participated in 
Fourth of July activities. A special tribute is given to Clifford Choquette, Membership Chair, 
who surpassed the goal 2,000 members by the year 2000. 

Trustees 

In April, the library said good-bye to Jaclyn Matzkin and Katherine Fisher. Their work and 
efforts to improve library services and facility are gratefully acknowledged. At the same time, 
the library welcomed new trustees Steve Maloney and Carol Sneden. 

Statistical Report 

Circulation: 391,534 

Reference: 14,630 

Moneys deposited with Town Treasurer: $5,567 



Library Personnel 

Mary E. Mahoney, Library Director, resigned 1 1/1/00 
Nanette Eichell, Assistant/Interim Director 
Electronic Resources: Barbara Morrison 
Reference: Deborah Perlow 
Circulation: Linda Robinson 



MacKay Library: Maureen Foley 
Technical Services: Christopher Kupec 

Community Services: Katherine Cryan-Hicks 
Children's Librarian: Cheryl Zani 



Recreation Commission 



Members: 

Harry Ayotte 
Robert Charpentier 
Janice Ruell 



Holly Hamilton, Recreation Director 
Amy Gilbride, Senior Clerk 



Meetings: First Monday of each month. 

The Recreation Commission is composed of seven members appointed by the Town Manager. 
The primary reason of the commission is to support and make recommendations to continuously 
improve and expand the recreational opportunities offered to the Chelmsford community. 

The Recreation Department offered over 400 self-supporting programs throughout the year. 
Some of the successful programs organized in the year 2000 include day trips, ski programs, 
dance lessons, art lessons, science program and much more. The Recreation Department will 
continue to develop programming in response to the growing and changing needs of all 
populations within the Town of Chelmsford. Recreation programs will be advertised in the 
Chelmsford Community Newsletter, which is mailed during the months of April, August and 
December. 



23 



The commission would like to welcome Amy Gilbride who has been hired as the full-time 
Senior Clerk for the Recreation Department. We would also like to thank Sandra Hall and 
Deborah Lashley for their years of dedication to the Chelmsford Recreation Department. We 
wish them the best of luck in all future endeavors. 

Last year the Recreation Department met our goal and the M.A.P, Middle School Activities 
Program was a success. We continued to develop the after school drop-in center for middle 
school students. The M.A.P. program was moved this year to the Murdoch Middle school. 
Students enjoy ping-pong, computer games, board games, creating the M.A.P. newsletter, 
friends, time to finish homework and so much more. In addition to the after school drop-in 
center M.A.P. offers additional programs and events including dances, movie & pizza nights, 
health programs, arts & crafts and more. We have over 300 members and our membership is 
still growing. 

The Town of Chelmsford voted to build a skateboard park near the McCarthy Middle School. 
The Skateboard Park was completed in the spring of 2000. Children of all ages enjoyed the new 
Skateboard Park the past year. 

We are most thankful to all residents whose support, dedication and involvement contributed to 
the success of the 2000 Recreation Department program. 



Recycling Committee 



Members 

Peter Nelson, Chairperson, resigned 9/5/00 

Johanna Morse, Chairperson as of 9/14/00 

Marc Grant, Vice Chairperson 

Mark Gallagher, Clerk 

Nancy Kaelin, Publicist 

Rick Conti 

Lisa Samie, Peter Nelson's replacement 

Barbara Scavezze, Recycling/Waste Coordinator, resigned 1/19/00 

Alison McKay, Recycling/Waste Coordinator as of 2/7/00, Ex-Officio as of 7/13/00 

The Town of Chelmsford contracted for the following services for residents, funded by taxes: 
weekly collection of solid waste, the biweekly collection of recyclables, and four curbside leaf 
collections which were held May 20, October 23, November 18, and December 2. The Town 
disposed of 14,943 tons of solid waste, and recycled 4,977 tons for a 33% recycling rate. The 
Town fulfilled the requirements for the Massachusetts Municipal Recycling Incentive Program, 
which provides an incentive payment based on the amount of recyclables collected in our 
curbside program. 

The Chelmsford Recycling Committee held ^rush drop-offs at Community Tree on April 8 and 
October 14. The CRC also held drop-offs uii May 20 and September 23 for metal (which was 
recycled), furniture and household goods (which were donated to the Massachusetts Coalition for 
the Homeless), clothing (which was donated to Goodwill Industries), electronics (which were 
recycled) and tires (which were recycled). The CRC held the annual Town- Wide Litter Clean 
Up on May 6. Volunteers picked up litter from conservation land, schoolyards, road shoulders, 
and illegal dumpsites, and gathered afterwards for a picnic at the Elks Lodge, which included 
door prizes and Pony Hayrides. 
24 



The Town's contract with Waste Management ended in June and bids were accepted for a new 
contract. Upon review of the bids, the Town selected F.W. Russell & Sons Disposal Inc. as its 
new solid waste and recycling hauler for a five-year term. Almost 160 Compost Bins were sold 
at several composting events as part of a state recycling grant to help reduce waste. The annual 
recycling and trash flyer was produced and mailed to all residents. This flyer included the 
recycling schedule, and detailed the proper methods, timing and places for disposal of various 
types of recyclable material and solid waste. This type of information was also prepared for 
inclusion in the Community Newsletter and the "Chelmsford Recycles" web page. 

Prepared by Alison McKay 



Town Clerk 



Town Clerk 


Mary E. St.Hilaire, CMQCMMC 


Ass't Town Clerk 


Elizabeth L. Delaney 


Senior Clerk 


Raymonde R. Legrand 


Senior Clerk P.T. 


Bernadette Gilet 


Sporting Licenses 


619 


Dog Licenses 


3105 


Kennel Licenses 


9 


Birth (Inc) 


430 


Deaths 


315 


Marriages 


193 


Intentions 


193 



Four elections were held in 2000. This is what we refer to as the Presidential year. We had a 
Presidential Primary in March. Our regular Town Election in April. The State Primary in 
September and the Presidential Election in November. There was a Special Town Meeting 
March 27 th . Two Meetings held for the Annual Spring Town Meeting. April 24 th and 27 th . There 
was only one session of the Annual Fall Town Meeting held on October 16 th . 



Treasurer / Tax Collector 



Employees: 

Charles F. Mansfield, 
Carol R. Lambert, 
Bertie A. Osborne, 
Judith A. Olsson, 
Pat Britton, 
Anna M. Griffin, 



Finance Director/Treasurer/Tax Collector 

Assistant Treasurer 

Departmental Assistant 

Legal C k 

Data Processing Clerk 

Accts. Payable/Receivable Clerk 



25 



Aided by an improved economy and conservative budgeting practices, the Town's financial 
position once again has improved significantly in fiscal year 2000. Property taxes provide the 
majority of revenues and current collections have remained high at 99.5% in fiscal year 2000. 
This is due to continued aggressive collection procedures. 

Chelmsford ended the fiscal 2000 with a General Fund balance of $5.3 million (7.3% of General 
Fund revenues). In addition, the Town has maintained a healthy Stabilization Fund of $7.9 
million ( 10% of General Fund revenues). Town officials have continued to add to the 
Stabilization Fund to defray debt service and capital expenditures. 

The Town has improved its long-term financial position through preparation and adherence to 
five-year fiscal forecasts and strategic planing. These forecasts and planning address operating 
costs, debt, facility needs, and financial reserves. 

Sincerely, 

Charles F. Mansfield 

Finance Director/Treasurer/Tax Collector 



Sewer Commission 



During the year 2000, the Chelmsford Sewer Project (CSP) reached substantial completion of 
construction in all remaining areas originally envisioned for sewers in the 1984 Wastewater 
Facilities Plan. The Hart Pond and East Chelmsford areas marked the final phase of this original 
plan. All of the remaining pipeline and lift stations for these projects were installed during the 
year 2000. This leaves only testing, final paving, and surface restoration to be completed during 
the spring of 2001; therefore, substantial completion was acknowledged in these areas. With the 
completion of this original plan, approximately 68% of the properties in Chelmsford are now 
connected or authorized to connect to the municipal sewer system. The final phase (Phase 4) of 
the CSP will sewer the remaining 32% of the properties in Chelmsford. Phase 4 began 
construction in 1999 and is currently scheduled for completion in 2008. 

At the peak of the 2000 construction season, there were as many as eight (8) construction crews 
active on any given day. As previously mentioned, construction in the Hart Pond and East 
Chelmsford areas reached substantial completion this year. In addition, the Phase 4A sewer 
project (Northwest Chelmsford and Miscellaneous Northwest Chelmsford Lateral Sewer 
Projects) made significant progress and is anticipated for completion during the summer of 2001. 
Construction of Phase 4B commenced and will continue throughout the 2001 construction 
season. Design of Phase 4C (Dennison/Locke Road Area Lateral Sewer Project) was completed 
during 2000 and construction is scheduled to commence in the spring of 2001. 

Since the early 1980's when the Chelmsfor 1 Sewer Commission (CSC) began planning for this 
project, our highest priority has been to mimmize local costs by aggressively pursuing, and then 
maximizing, all possible state and/or federal aid available. Through aggressive lobbying, and 
through submission of stacks of documentation justifying "Need" each fiscal year, Chelmsford 
had been positioned high on the state priority list for financial assistance through the State 
Revolving Loan Fund (SRF). In 1997, the DEP changed the guidelines used to rank projects for 
funding and these new guidelines do not favor projects like the CSP. Because of these changes, 
the first few areas of Phase 4 have not received SRF funding. In 2001, the CSC intends to 
26 



continue to concentrate it efforts on lobbying the legislature to resume funding for the remainder 
of Phase 4 under the SRF program. 

As mentioned in the 1999 report, the Chelmsford Sewer Commission received an honor when 
the New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA) invited our Vice Chairman, Barry 
B. Balan, to present a technical paper at a regional conference. Mr. Balan and Steven K. 
Pedersen, P.E., Weston & Sampson Engineers, Inc. presented the paper entitled "Horizontal 
Directional Drilling In Environmentally Sensitive Areas As Part Of The Chelmsford, MA, 
Municipal Sewer Project" at NEWEA's Annual Conference on January 25, 2000. The paper 
detailed the innovative trenchless technology methods used on the CSP to cross through 
environmentally sensitive areas in Chelmsford. The paper was extremely well received and was 
selected for publication in the May 2000 Journal of NEWEA (Volume 34, No.l). 

The Commission would like to acknowledge our administrative staff, Jacqueline Sheehy, Amy 
Baron, and Heather Callery for their hard work, professionalism and patience. The Sewer 
Division of the Department of Public Works shares their multifaceted duties and they are the 
individuals who interface with the public on a daily basis. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 
John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 
Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 
George F. Abely, Clerk 
Richard J. Day 
John F. Souza 




27 



Sewer Commission 

Front Row: Commissioner, John F. Souza, Amy Baron, John P. Emerson, Jr. Chairman, 

and Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 
Second Row: Commissioner George F. Abley, Clerk, Gregory S. Pion, Commissioner Richard J. Day, 

Seven K. Pedersen, Attorney James Harrington, JR. 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Police Department 



I herein respectfully submit for your information and review the Annual Report of the Police 
Department for the year 2000. At the present time, the Department is made up of 60 permanent 
Officers. 



CHIEF OF POLICE 

Raymond G. McCusker 

LIEUTENANTS 

Steven A. Bums 
James F. Murphy 
Francis X. Roark 
Scott R. Ubele 



Bureau Of Investigative Services/Inspectors 

Detective Sergeant Timothy F. O'Connor 
James T. Finnegan 
Jared S. Finnegan 

Domestic Violence Officer / Inspector 
Roland E. Linstad 



SERGEANTS 

Daniel J. Ahern 
Paul E. Cooper 
Philip R. Dube 
J. Ronald Gamache 
John A. Roark 
E. Michael Rooney 
Edward F. Smith 
Colin C. Spence 
John O. Walsh 
James M. Spinney, Jr. 



Gail F. Hunter 
Brian F. Mullen 
George A. Tyros 

Juvenile Officer / Inspector 
Kenneth R. Duane 



Crime Prevention Offier / Inspector 

Jeffrey J. Bemier 



Traffic Division/Community Response Unit 

Sgt. Francis P. Kelly 
Richard A. Adams 
Patrick W. Daley 



Motor Cycle Patrol Unit 

Timothy B. Bourke 
David R. Tine 
Craig E. Walsh 

Patrol Officers 

Todd D. Ahem 
Jeffrey A. Blodgett 
Bruce A. Darwin 
Jennifer L. Fay 
Stephen M. Fredericks 
Francis J. Goode, Jr. 
Gary A. Hannagan 
Michael A. Horan 
Andrew N. Lopilato 
David F. MacKenzie, Jr. 

28 



Deparment Criminal Prosecutor / 
Lowell District Court 

Sergeant Robert M. Bums 



David M. Leo 
Robert J. Murphy, Jr. 
Paul E. Richardson 
Christopher D. Zaher 

D.A.R.E. Officer 

Richard D. Hallion 



Peter C. McGeown 
Edward F. Quinn 
John E. Redican, in 
Chandler J. Robinson 
Anthony Spinazola 
Sean F. Swift 
Jonathan P. Tays 
Francis P. Teehan 
Robert J. Trudel 
William R. Walsh 



Rebecca A. McCarthy 
John J. McGeown 

Full Time Civilian Dispatchers 

Robert A. Caron, Jr. 
David J. DeFreitas 
Richard Demers 
Frederick F. Flynn, Jr. 



Departmental Assistant 

Mary Jane Grant 

Senior Clerk 

Diane M. Morgan 



Gary R. White 
Ernest R. Woessner 



Francis P. Kelly, Jr. 
Michael P. Nelson 
Kevin R. Proulx 
Christian W. Seminatore 
William H. Vaughan 



Principal Clerks 

Donna A. Fox 
Sandra A. Hall 



RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 



Permits, fines, and fees 44,676.50 

Lowell District Court Revenue 12,761.00 

Registry of Motor Vehicles Disbursements 165,015.00 

Total 222,452.50 

BREAKDOWN OF ARRESTS 

Adult Arrests 512 

Juvenile Arrests 48 

Total Arrests 560 

Whites Arrested 491 

Blacks Arrested 26 

Asians Arrested 26 

Unknown Arrested 17 

Charges Lodged Against Those Arrested 1,171 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Pending 1,074 

Continued 8 

Dismissed 151 

Default 5 

Guilty 182 

Placed on File 147 

Not Guilty 3 

Placed in ASAP 

Placed on Probation 14 

Restitution Ordered 1 

Turned Over to Other Agency 15 

Continued Without Finding 142 

Committed to D.Y.S 

Total Findings 1,742 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 23,521 

Summons Served 351 



29 



Accidents Reported 1,419 

Fatal Accidents 

Personal Injury Accidents 194 

Mileage of Cruisers 582,000 

Station Lockups 599 

Citations Issued 4,211 

Parking Violations Issued 445 

Restraining Orders Served 100 

Protective Custody 39 

Alarm Calls Responded to by Cruisers 2,367 



ACHIEVEMENTS 

The Chelmsford Police Department was extremely busy over the past year with significant 
increased in calls for service as well as arrests and citations issued. In spite of the increase 
demand, the men and women of the Police Department reduced the overall crime rate in 
Chelmsford by 16%. In an effort to further our Community Policing efforts, full time Officers 
have been assigned to Central and Vinal Squares. Also, Patrol Officers are assigned to specific 
areas for an entire year and a team-policing concept has been instituted. 

The Police Department received the following Grants for year 2000: 

1. Federal Universal Cops Hiring Grant 100,000.00 

2. State Community Policing Grant 42,000.00 

3. State D.A.R.E. Grant 13,000.00 

4. Governor's Highway Safety Grant 5,000.00 

5. School Violence Grant (STARS) 20,000.00 



The Police Station site work has been completed and construction should begin in spring 2001. 
Computerization in the cruisers has been expanded to ten marked units. Officers now have 
access to valuable information in a matter of seconds. 

Our Crime Mapping Program is completed and being utilized. The Department Web Page is 
being updated and will take on a new look for 2001 . 

Special Millennium Chelmsford Police Badges were worn for year 2000 then retired on 
December 31, 2000. 



RETIREMENTS 

Officer Russell (Butch) Linstad retired after 32 years of service to the Town. Butch worked as a 
Patrol Officer, Juvenile Officer and a Community Policing Bicycle Officer. He was also one of 
the original members of the NEMLEC __ctical Police Force Unit. The members of the 
department wish Russ and his family well and thank them for their dedication and sacrifices. 



30 



MISSION STATEMENT 

We, the Chelmsford Police Department, in partnership with our community are committed to 
maintaining the peace, protecting life and property, and providing professional law enforcement 
and crime prevention services. We accept the challenge of reducing the fear of crime by the 
prevention of criminal activity. We shall provide these services with compassion, dignity, and a 
proficiency within the framework of the United States Constitution. To enhance the quality of 
life for all citizens, we will cooperate with other agencies and groups to resolve community 
concerns. To fulfill our mission, the Chelmsford Police Department will provide a supportive 
work environment that fosters the professional development of its members. 

Service will be our commitment. . . 

Honor and Integrity our mandate. 



GOALS 

1. To take occupancy of the New Police Facility on or before July 1, 2002. 

2. To finalize the Police Department computerization process including e-mail capabilities with 
other Town Officers and expanding the Police Department web page. 

3. To minimize the traffic congestion that will result from major road construction (Route 3 and 
Central Square improvements) through planning and cooperation from local and state 
officials. 

4. To provide the youth of Chelmsford with the necessary skills to resist drugs and violence. 



OBJECTIVE 

To provide the citizens of Chelmsford the safest community within the Commonwealth by 
education, enforcing the laws and eliciting community participation and cooperation. 

I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen, 
and all sworn officials, departments and committees for the excellent cooperation given to the 
Police Department. 

I would also congratulate both sworn and non-sworn personnel of this Department for 
outstanding performance of duty. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Chief Raymond G. McCusker 



31 



Fire Department 



DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 



FIRE CHIEF 
John E. Parow 



DEPUTY CHIEF 
James A. Sousa 
Michael F. Curran 



CAPTAINS 



James M. Spinney * 
Charles A. Schramm 
Michael Burke 

FIREFIGHTERS 

William Amundson 
William Bacon 
Christopher Brothers 
Thomas Brothers 
William Cady 
David Campbell 
William Campbell 
Jeff Cancella 
Jack Carroll 
Anthony Cincevich 
David Clancy 
Kevin Clarke 
F. Mark Conlin 
Daniel Corey 
James Curran 
William Curran 
William Dalton 
Brian Daly 
John DePalma * 
Michael Donoghue 
Bruce Donovan 
Donald A. Drew 
James Durkin 
Jesse Foster 
Daniel Funaro 
Robert Gardner 
Daniel Ubele 

DEPT. ASSISTANT 
Martha A. DeSaulnier 
* retired in 2000 



Richard Miller 
James P. Boermeester 
Walter F. Adley 



David Hadley 
Henry Houle 
William Jamer 
Dennie Keohane 
William Keohane 
John Kivlan 
Raymond Kydd 
Cynthia Lec2ynski 
Daniel Manley 
Leo Manley 
Leslie Merrill 
Edward Nolet 
Kevin O'Brien 
Marc Pare 
Donnie Peterson 
Daniel Reid, Sr. 
Daniel Reid, Jr. 
James Reid 
John Reid 
Michael Ridlon 
Rick Rivard 
John Robinson 
Gary Ryan 
George Ryan 
Kevin Sheehy 
Brian Stanton 



MECHANIC 
James Keeley 



In calendar year 2000, the Chelmsford Fire department responded to 4,580 calls, an increase of 
165 calls over 1999 Although structure fires remained constant total fires decreased. Medical Aid 
calls accounted for the largest increase this year over last, totaling 2,134 calls 



32 



The department's policy of sending all newly hired firefighters to the Massachusetts Fire 
Academy Recruit Training Program was very evident this year Six (6) firefighters graduated 
from the eleven (11) week program Firefighter Jeff Cancella graduated number one in his class 
In addition, three (3) firefighters attended training and became State certified Emergency 
Medical Technicians 



Firefighter Donnie Peterson headed the Student Awareness Fire Education (S.A F E ) program 
this year He was assisted by Firefighters Michael Donoghue, John Kivlan and Will Amundson 
Over 1,500 preschool, kindergarten and first graders were taught the importance of fire safety 
Additionally, Firefighter Peterson organized the 7th Annual Fire Prevention Open House, in 
October, with over 500 residents in attendance 



During the year two department members retired, Captain James Spinney, a 34 year veteran and 
Firefighter John DePalma, a 30 year veteran Three firefighters were also hired to fill open 
vacancies, Firefighter Brian Daly, Thomas Brothers and Robert Gardner I wish the retirees well 
on their retirement and welcome the new firefighters on board with the hopes of a long and safe 
career. 



The tragic Worcester warehouse fire that killed six (6) Worcester firefighters brought to light the 
importance of new technology and the ability to rescue lost or trapped firefighters at a fire scene 
This past year the local Lions Club along with the firefighter Union, Local 1839, purchased a 
Thermal Imaging camera for the department to aid in search and rescue efforts. The Town 
matched this donation, giving the department two Thermal Imaging cameras This new 
technology will greatly enhance our ability to rescue civilians and firefighters alike. 



I would like to take this opportunity to thank my support staff, department members, other Town 
departments, the Board of Selectmen, the Town Manager and the residents of Chelmsford for 
their help and cooperation over the past year 



Respectfully submitted, 
John E Parow, Fire Chief 



33 



YR 


A 


B 





MA 


I 


S 


FA 


M 


TOTAL 


1991 


70 


7 


153 


18 


706 


1128 


76 


771 


2979 


1992 


63 


39 


99 


19 


755 


983 


76 


821 


2855 


1993 


59 


29 


103 


29 


758 


1193 


128 


885 


3184 


1994 


88 


46 


100 


11 


842 


1142 


70 


1127 


3426 


1995 


100 


52 


114 


28 


852 


953 


4 


1445 


3548 


1996 


67 


66 


74 


14 


973 


1441 


3 


1609 


4247 


1997 


56 


36 


97 


17 


808 


1406 





1724 


4144 


1998 


50 


53 


113 


15 


780 


1399 


2 


1841 


4253 


1999 


47 


40 


127 


23 


842 


1361 





1975 


4415 


2000 


37 


39 


81 


22 


903 


1364 





2134 


4580 



YR = YEAR 
A = AUTO FIRE 
B = BUILDING FIRE 

- OUTSIDE FIRE 
MA = MUTUALAID 

1 = INVESTIGATION 
S = SERVICE 

FA = FALSE ALARM 
M = MEDICAL AID 



Auxiliary Police 



The Police Auxiliary Unit assisted the regular force at many motor vehicle accidents and assisted 
with over a dozen Town sponsored events. The Officers donated a total of 12,223 man-hours 
performing their assigned duties. "Operation Property Check" was a tremendous success helping 
to keep vandalism to a minimum. The statistics were: 



1999 



Vacant house checks 
School Property Checks 
Town Property Checks 



1,820 

8,736 

17.472 

28,028 

This preventative patrol saves property owners and the town thousands of dollars annually by 
reducing malicious destruction. 

I would like to thank all members of the Auxiliary Unit for a great effort this past year. The 
members of the Auxiliary Unit are as follows: 



2000 
1,050 
9,820 
15.308 
26,176 



34 



Caron, Robert A. 
Doole, Steven 
Elie, Richard C. 
Goyette, Richard R. 
Hansom, Jason P. 
Holsinger, Ronald C. 
Kulisich, Peter D. 
Pacella, Corina 
Peal, Thomas 



Proulx, Kevin 
Ravanis, Peter J. 
Roscoe, Ralph 
Seminatore, Christian W. 
Thomas, Matthew D. 
Tousignant, Leo 
Tyler, David W. 
Walsh, Kathleen A. 
Windhol, John 



Respectfully submitted, 
Sergeant Francis P. Kelly 



Animal Control Officer 



1999 



Citizen complaints answered 897 

Dogs picked up and taken to pound 74 

Dogs returned to owners 55 

Dogs adopted after 10 days 

Stray dogs disposed of at the Lowell Humane Society 19 

Road kills disposed of at the Lowell Humane Society 91 

Violation citations issued 8 

Animal bite reports 41 

Total miles traveled 12,939 

Dogs licensed for 2000 3,184 

Value of citation fines 300.00 

Other funds turned into the town 750.00 



2000 

869 

65 

55 



10 

192 

16 

15 

13,656 
..3,105 
450.00 
855.00 



The year 2000 was a busy one. While citizens complaints decreased for the second year in a 
row, many other categories increased. One noticeable increase was the disposal of road kills, 
which more than doubled. Disposal of these animals is done at a cost to the Town through the 
Lowell Humane Society. 

The Animal Control Officer receives numerous calls regarding removal of animals from 
chimneys, under porches, or inside attics. This function, however, must be performed by a 
private organization such as Pest Control Services. 

I would remind all pet owners that it is their responsibility to insure that their pets are properly 
vaccinated. If you own a dog, it must be leashed or under your control at all times. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, B rd of Selectmen, and all the members of the Police 
Department for all their support. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Franklin E. Warren 
Animal Control Officer 



35 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The Department of Public Works consists of several Divisions including the highway, 
engineering, recreation, public buildings, parks, public shade trees and the sewer. 



Engineering Division 



Members: 

James E. Pearson, PE 
George LeMasurier 
Bruce Schnepper 
Gail A. Hartwell 
Mary Lou Landry 



Director & Town Engineer 
Assistant Town Engineer 
Engineer/ Inspector 
Departmental Assistant 
Part-time II 



2000 was a busy year for this division. Fourteen (14) site plans along with six (6) subdivision 
plans and sixteen (16) Approval- Not-Required Plans were reviewed. Thirty- one (31) 
construction sites were inspected for the Planning Board. 

The engineering division provided layout, grades, technical assistance, and inspections for the 
Highway Division and for the subcontractors hired for the construction of sidewalks on Acton 
Road, Dalton Road, Maple Road and on Middlesex Street; for the reconstruction of the tennis 
and basketball courts at the South Row School; and for the improvements associated with the 
veteran memorials at Concord Road and also at Main Street. The Engineering Division also 
responded to drainage concerns from residents of the town, Town Manager, Board of Selectmen 
and assisted the Highway Division on numerous improvement projects. 

At the end of July an Engineer/Inspector was added to our Division. Bruce Schnepper comes to 
us with many years of engineering and construction experience. Some of his duties include the 
inspections of street openings by utility contractors including the Water Departments within the 
town. During this five-month period ninety-seven (97) inspections kept Bruce very busy. All 
requests for tree concerns from residents are also handled within this Division. An engineer 
determines who owns each tree and if safety issues are a concern. The work is assigned to a 
certified tree company to safety prune the tree or if necessary, remove the tree. Town shade trees 
are not removed unless the arborist recommends the removal of a tree. Over sixty-eight tree 
requests were completed during this same time period. 

Payrolls, expense vouchers and budgeting for all divisions except the Highway Division are 
performed in this office. The office staff also handles a myriad of questions, complaints, and 
information requests either in person, via telephone and more recently, over the computer. 



Public Buildings Division 



Members: 

Theodore Godfrey 
Donald Guillemette 
Bernard Murphy 



Superintendent 
Maintenance Specialist 
Maintenance Specialist 



36 



The Public Buildings Division maintains all public buildings in town. This division performs the 
everyday custodial duties as well as the updating of buildings to meet the ever-changing needs. 
This division also accommodates Board of Selectmen meetings, various town committees, 
commissions and multiple group meetings ensuring no conflicts with dates, times and meeting 
rooms. Snow removal during the winter months can also keep the staff very busy. 

Along with the daily duties performed, a systematic floor care program has been implemented. 
Other duties include furniture repair, mechanical repair, repair of ceilings, walls, woodwork and 
painting and general "handy work" around the various buildings. 

This year's special projects: 

Town Offices 

• Nine offices were freshly painted and the 15 year-old carpeting in each office was 
replaced. 

• The gym floor was newly sanded and refmished. 

• The Planning Board and Credit Union offices were relocated to facilitate town 
operations. 

• Ongoing work for compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act continues. 
Old Town Hall 

• The offices were freshly painted and the carpeting was replaced. 

• A new stage curtain was installed. 

The Public Building staff is also involved in numerous projects throughout the year some of 
these include Winterfest, Student Government Day, recycle drop-off and the 4 
celebration. 



th 



of July 



Parks Division 



Members: 

Ed Jamros 
Randy Boisvert 



Groundskeeper 
Laborer 



The Parks Division maintains all parks, traffic islands, ballfields, playgrounds and commons in 
town. The grounds are groomed each spring and prepared for the heavy use each area receives 
during the year. This Division also prepares the Town Common for the annual July 4 th 
celebration as well as the cleanup and restoring of damaged areas resulting from an abundance of 
activities throughout the year. 



37 



Special projects this year included: 
Southwell Field 

• A new walking path was built courtesy of Friends of Southwell. 

• The building was freshly painted by the Parks staff. 

• New clay infields were installed with help from Engineering and Highway crews. 

• Parking lot lights were installed with the help of Massachusetts Electric. 
East Chelmsford Park 

• New fencing around the playground was installed thanks to Merrimack Education 
Center. 

Varney Park 

• Thanks to Varney Restoration Committee, the Town and numerous volunteers and 
donations, a new playground was erected. A special thanks to Bob and Trish Kahl for 
their exhaustive effort and determination. 

Roberts Field 

• With the help of Chelmsford High Community Help Program the playground parking 
lot was seal-coated. 

Thank you to all who participated in the Adopt-a-Park program this year. This year, Dick 
Codling, Stony Brook Landscaping, LifeSavers, all assisted with the care and maintenance of a 
traffic island. A special thanks goes to Charles and Jeanne Parlee who have worked with us to 
improve the common in South Chelmsford. The Parlees donated the underground irrigation 
system, landscaping and plantings, and have been providing the weekly maintenance as well. 
They have also been working on a new granite post and wood rail fence and watering trough 
which, when completed, will make the common resemble its appearance from archived photos of 
the 1800's. 



Sewer Division 



Members: 

Michael Vosnakis 
James Casparro 
Daniel Belkas 
Rick Rowsell 
David Palmer 
Evelyn Newman 
Jacqueline Sheeny 
Amy Baron 
Heather Callery 
John Kobelenz 



Operations Supervisor 
Sewer Inspector 
Maintenance Mechanic 
Maintenance Mechanic 
Maintenance Laborer 
Departmental Assistant 
Departmental Assistant 
Senior Clerk 
Part-time Clerk I 
Safety Plumbing Inspector 



38 



The Sewer Division continued to expand this year with the addition of 631 new sewer 
connections, bringing the total of on-line sewer users to 6634. The Abbott Lane pump station 
went online during this year bringing the total number of active pump stations to 19. Major work 
items this year include: 

• Grinders at Katrina and Southwell rebuilt 

• Wetwell cleaning at Katrina and Southwell 

• Progress Avenue pump overhauls 

The operations staff performs sewer connection inspections, maintenance, repairs, and upgrades 
of the sewer pumping stations and sewer lines as they become necessary. They also perform 
building grounds maintenance to the pump stations as well as any other duties that keep the 
collection system operating smoothly. 

The office staff handles all sewer betterments, sewer billing, phone inquiries, complaints and 
other related correspondence. They also perform all the clerical work for the elected Chelmsford 
Sewer Commission. With the ongoing sewer construction and the hundreds of sewer connections 
each year it is one of the busiest places in Town Hall. 

There were some staffing changes this year. Mike Vosnakis took over as Operations Supervisor 
in April, Amy Baron filled the position as Senior Clerk left open by Irene Oczkowski's move to 
the Highway Division, Maintenance Mechanic Rick Rowsell and Maintenance Laborer Dave 
Palmer transferred from the Highway Division. The Sewer Division will miss Evelyn Newman 
who retired after decades of dedicated service to the Town. Evelyn was extremely talented, 
dedicated and professional in all her duties. The entire staff wishes her a healthy and happy 
retirement. 



Highway Division 



Members: 

Administration: 
John Long 
Larry Ferreira 
Irene Oczkowski 

Drivers: 

Todd Chase 
David Eacrett 
Bryan Edwards 
Gregory Gullage 
David Irvine 
James Knight 
Thomas Ryan 
David Silva 
David Tyler 
Paul Winegar 



Superintendent 
Foreman 
Principal Clerk 



Operators: 

Gary Beaulieu 
Audie Boudreau 
Joseph Eriksen 
Dennis Greenwood 
Raymond Maybury 

Mechanics : 

John Ferreira, Lead Mechanic 
Richard Jensen 



Laborer: 



Kenneth Burroughs 



39 



The Highway Division maintains and improves all the streets, culverts, catch basins and 
manholes, street signs, traffic signs and traffic signals for approximately 230 miles of roadway. 
Additionally, the Highway Division clears the streets and public lots of snow and ice and assists 
the other departments with the division's equipment and expertise of the crew. The office 
maintains all financial records needed for the reporting, tracking, payments of all vouchers 
connected with the highway budget, including General Expenses, Salaries, Snow and Ice, 
Massachusetts Chapter 90 Funding, Street Lighting and Capital Expenditures. 

Streets Resurfaced 

Acton Road 
Dalton Road 
Mill Road 

All the drainage facilities on the resurfaced streets were reconstructed prior to resurfacing along 
with drainage improvements on Middlesex Street and Maple Road. Approximately 5,500 L.F. of 
sidewalks were constructed on Acton Road, Middlesex Street and Maple Road. In addition 
approximately 2,000 S.F. of sub-drains were installed on Sleigh Road. Culverts were replaced 
on Industrial Avenue and Alpha Road. Also all drains in the sewer area were reconstructed prior 
to the pavement overlay by the Sewer Commission in South and East Chelmsford. 

The Highway Department helped with the completion of the Skateboard Park at McCarthy 
School. They spent many hours reconstructing the Tennis and Basketball Courts at South Row 
School. The division also constructed the two softball fields at Southwell Field and two softball 
fields for the School Department. 

Closing: 

This year the Department took special pleasure in its involvement on two projects in particular. 
The first was with helping the Varney Park Restoration Committee with the construction of the 
playground. Members of all divisions worked from noon until 8 PM as volunteers on the 
construction. Members strapped on work belts and hammered, sanded, cut, dug, prepared snacks, 
routed, did whatever job was assigned by the supervisor of construction. Afterwards the crew 
returned to the Highway garage for a well-earned dinner. 

The second notable project was the relocation reconstruction of the Rudolph Harold LeFebvre, 
Jr. memorial at Concord Road and the construction of the memorial to brothers Allan and 
Herbert Clark at Main Street. All three men were Chelmsford servicemen killed in the line of 
duty, Mr. LeFebvre in the Korean War and the Clark brothers in World War II. All DPW 
divisions played a role in either the planning, engineering, construction, cleanup, or landscaping, 
culminating with Ted Godfroy of the Public Buildings division singing the National Anthem at 
the dedication ceremony. 

We thankfully acknowledge the three Water Districts for their ongoing cooperation, the Police 
and Fire Departments for their assistance, the Adopt-a-Park volunteers, and the Sewer 
Commission with whom ongoing infrastructure improvements are coordinated. 

Finally I would like to thank all the staff members for their dedication and professionalism in 
servicing the needs of the town and its residents. 

Respectfully submitted, 
James E. Pearson, PE 
Director of Public Works 

40 



EDUCATION 



Public Schools 




School Committee: 

Front Row: Judith Mallette, Mary Jo Griffin, Dr. Richard Moser, Superintendent 
Back Row: Evelyn Thoren, James Trager, Sheila Pichette 

The membership of the Chelmsford School Committee at the end of the 2000 calendar year 
included Mrs. Mary Jo Griffin, Chair; Mrs. Judith Mallette, Vice Chair; Mr. Jim Trager, 
Secretary; Mrs. Sheila Pichette, Member at Large; Mrs. Evelyn Thoren, Member at Large; and 
Daniel Yang, Student Representative. Central administration for the Chelmsford School 
Department included Dr. Richard Moser, Superintendent of Schools; Dr. Karen Mazza, Assistant 
Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction; Mr. Bernie DiNatale, Director of Information 
and Technology Services; Mr. Robert Cruickshank, Business Manager; and Mrs. Dory Toppan, 
Director of Personnel. 

The most salient issue of importance to the future of the Chelmsford Schools during 2000 has 
been the on-going work of the Chelmsford Building Needs Committee (BNC). The BNC is a 
committee of town officials, school committee members, parents and school department staff 
who have been working with an architectural firm, Drummey Rosanne Anderson, Inc. for the 
purpose of analyzing the need for facility improvements to the Chelmsford Schools. 

The work of the BNC has concluded with the development of a master plan for facility 
improvements in the years ahead. The master plan has included several important 
recommendations. Summary statements include the following. 

41 



Elementary Schools 

• Maintain five K - 4 elementary schools at the current locations. Monitor the 
enrollment at the elementary level. If enrollment increases significantly, consider 
the use of temporary classrooms as an interim strategy until the completion of 
renovations and new additions at the secondary level. 

• Maintain separate spaces for art, music, and computer instruction. 

• Implement the maintenance and capital plan program recommended by the Building 
Needs Committee. 

Middle Schools 



• 



Consider a major renovation and new construction to the McCarthy Middle School 
to meet enrollment projections and program priorities. 

• Two additions to the existing school would provide newly designed space for art 
and science instruction. At the same time renovation to the existing building will 
improve instructional space for other disciplines and prepare the building for 
another forty years of service to Chelmsford students. 

• Consider new construction and renovation to Parker Middle School in an effort to 
provide sufficient space for classroom instruction, school administration and library 
services. 

Chelmsford High School 

• Consider new construction to include a performing arts center, as well as art and 
science instruction. 

• Renovate vacated space to meet other program needs in English, math, foreign 
language, special education and other disciplines. 

• Commit to the implementation of the maintenance and capital plan as recommended 
bytheBNC. 

Related Recommendations 

• Relocate five per-school classrooms to another location in order to provide 
sufficient instructional space for a growing student enrollment. 

• Maintain the School Department Central Office in the lower wing of Chelmsford 
High School. 

The next step of the facilities initiative is to seek additional funds for an architectural study for a 
preliminary design for building renovations and new construction at the three secondary schools. 
The end product of the preliminary design is a proposal that could be brought forward for Town 
approval. 

The Chelmsford School Committee is appreciative of the two-year commitment of the Building 
Needs Committee. Committee membership included: Tom Moran, Bill Dalton, Bernie Lynch, 
Clare Jeannotte, Mary Frantz, Judy Mallette, Evelyn Thoren, Bev Barrett, Kevin Porter, Kit 
Harbison, Steve Meidell, Bob Bennett, Kathy Helean, Jane Gilmore, Karen Mazza, and Dick 
Moser. 



42 



The year 2000 also brought the service of three new school principals: Irene Hannigan at the 
South Row Elementary School, Denise Holmes at the McCarthy Middle School, and Frank 
Tiano at the Westlands Elementary School. 

The Chelmsford School Committee continues to commit to the mission of our school system for 

all students "to cultivate the development of students into self-confident, lifelong learners 

and responsible citizens who possess personal integrity and the ability to succeed in a global 
society." The Committee welcomes input from our community on school programs and looks 
forward to a positive end to the 2000-01 school year. 

IN CONCLUSION: 

The School Committee wishes to extend deep appreciation to the following staff members for 
their years of loyal and meritorious service and who have retired this past year: 



TEACHERS: 






High School: 






Joseph Ford 


Math 




Elizabeth J. Foster 


English 




Deidre E. Sousa 


Home Economics 




Middle School: 






Calista Coady 


Special Education 


McCarthy School 


Mary Denise Dunn 


Reading 


McCarthy School 


Beverly Hedison 


Reading 


McCarthy School 


Delores Kricker 


Special Needs 


McCarthy School 


Carol A. Munroe 


Grade 6 


McCarthy School 


Carol A. Miller 


Music 


Parker School 


Ruth Sykes-AUenby 


Art 


McCarthy School 


Elementary School: 






Janet Kattar 


Grade 2 


Byam School 


Mary Alice Desclos 


Grade 4 


Center School 


Kathryn A. Spooner 


Grade 4 


Westlands School 


Administrators: 






Charlene Betourney 


Principal 


McCarthy School 


Jeffrey Murray 


Principal 


South Row School 


Support Staff Personnel 






Margaret Cornell 


Administrative Assist. 


Central Office Administration 


Natalye B. Cease 


Clerk 


McCarthy School 


Bette DiPrimio 


Secretary 


Center School 


Claire Lynch 


Secretary 


Community Education Office 



IN MEMORIAM: 

The Community and the School Department were deeply grieved by the death of Richard L. 
Hentz, Principal of McCarthy Middle School. He will long be remembered for his devotion to 
the children of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully Submitted by: 
Richard H. Moser, Ph.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



43 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School 



100 Littleton Road, Westford 01886 
978-692-471 1 FAX 978-392-0570 



Judith L. Klimkiewicz 
Victor Kiloski 
Joseph Costa 
Charla Boles 
Carol Hiedenrich 
Robert Campbell 
Kent Forty 
George Kalarites 


Administration 


Superintendent 

Assistant Superintendent/Principal 
Business Manager 
Director of Pupil Personnel 
Director of Technology 
Director of Community Outreach 
Dean of Students 
Facilities Manager 




School Committee 






Peter Bagni 


Chelmsford 


Alternates 




Sharon Shanahan 


Chelmsford 






Samuel Poulten - secretary 


Chelmsford 


TBD 


Littleton 


TBD 


Groton 


Joy Dalrymple 


Pepperell 


Augustine Kish 


Littleton 


Irene Machemer 


Townsend 


Hajo Koester 


Westford 


Heidi Shultz 


Shirley 


Barbara Sherritt 


Townsend 


Deborah D'Agostino 


Groton 


Irene Machemer 


Townsend 


Frank Heslin 


Westford 


Joan OiBrien 


Westford 






Garry Ricard- Chairman 


Pepperell 


* Div VIII Liaison: S. Poulten 




Jerrilyn Bozicas 


Pepperell 






Al Buckley 


Pepperell 






Steve Wood 


Shirley 






Mark McNulty 


Shirley 







44 



SCHOOL DATA 

Type: Public, regional, four-year vocational technical high 



Student Enrollment: 

Chelmsford 

Groton 

Littleton 

Pepperell 

Shirley 

Townsend 

Westford 

Ayer 

School Choice 



As of October 1,2000 



Total Enrollment 



108 

52 

12 

120 

34 

96 

58 

27 

57 

565 



Accreditation : New England Association of Schools and Colleges. 

College Board Code Number : 222-333 



Faculty : fifty-nine certified teachers 



Pupil Teacher Ratio : 10:1 



Calendar Three twelve-week trimesters. Eight 45 minute periods, five days per week. 

The school schedule alternates one week of academic classes with a week in a 
vocational-technical program for grades ten through twelve. 



Vocational-Technical Programs 

Autobody Repair 

Automotive Technology 

Banking, Marketing & Retail 

Construction/Cabinet Making 

Culinary Arts 

Computer Aided Drafting/Design 

Dental Assistant 

Early Childcare Education 

Electrical Technology 

Electronics/Robotics 



Graphic Communications 

Horticulture/Landscape Design 

Hotel/Restaurant Management 

Machine Tool Technology 

Medical Occupations 

Metal Fabrications 

Office Technology 

Painting & Decorating/Interior Design 

Plumbing/Heating 

Pre-Engineering 



SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

College preparatory courses are available In all core subjects 

Foreign language is offered all four years for interested students. 

Juniors who are eligible may elect to enter the Dual Enrollment Program and take their junior and senior 
year at a community or state college facility in Massachusetts or New Hampshire. Upon completion, they 
receive their high school diploma from Nashoba and one or two years of credit from the college. 



45 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Nashoba sponsors an extensive program in intra-scholastic sports including varsity teams in ten 
sports with equal opportunities for male and female students. Other activities include Student 
Council, National Honor Society, Yearbook, Students Against Destructive Decisions, Skills 
USA, Student Leadership, peer mediation, and many special interest clubs. Nashoba sports 
programs have no user fees. 

The Kids Career Exploration Program 

A free program for Four afternoons from 3-6 PM offering students in grades five, six, and seven 
an opportunity to explore career opportunities in many areas such as Electrical Technology, 
Medical Occupations, Culinary Arts, Office Technologies, and World Language (Spanish). 
Programs are subject to change from year to year. 

Continuing & Community Education 

Approximately fifteen hundred adults attend this evenings run program a school year. 

Summer Programs 

Nashoba Valleys Allstars Summer Program is offered to 5th, 6th, and 7th graders in the area. 
Students enjoy outdoor adventures, sports programs, computer applications & graphics, and 
academic enrichment. 



46 



HUMAN SERVICES 



Council on Aging 



Members: 

Joe Warburton, Chairperson 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Vice Chairperson 
John Clancy 
Catherine Goodwin 
Joan LaTourneau 
Ray Palmer 



Jean McCaffery, Clerk 
Richard Condike 
Robert Grippo 
Elizabeth Marshall 
Donna Pechulis 



As witnesses to time and change, we crossed, as a society, over the threshold of a new 
millennium. For those of us who are practitioners and administrators in the aging network, it has 
been an era of challenge, growth and constant assessment. Over the past twenty-five years, there 
has been considerable program development and financial support from all levels of government. 
And the reality for our future is just beginning. Longevity with all of its positives will bring 
forth an abundance of questions resounding off the walls of our schools, churches and governing 
agencies. Sheer numbers in combination with that demographic bulge called the "baby boom" 
will force aging issues to become an even greater priority. It will be interesting. Our efforts over 
this past year give statistical support to the level of growth in this continuum of care. 



Adult Social Day Program 

Congregate Lunch 

Elder Home Repairs 

Friendly Visitor Program 

Health Benefits Counseling 

Other Health Services 

Outreach (home visits, shopping assistance) 

Meals on Wheels 

Transportation (medical/day care/sr. ctr.) 

Respite/Companion Care 

Trips — Recreational 

Tax & Fuel Assistance 



2,877 (client days) 42 elders 

45,553 meals, Avg. daily: 187 

68 repairs — 54 seniors 

1,360 hrs. - 52 participants 

384 seniors/Insurance Sr. Pharmacy Applications 

1,278 seniors, Flu Clinics Podiatry/Hearing 

15-20 seniors each week 

16,197 meals Avg. daily: 66 

9,192 single trips: 184 seniors 

19,874 provider hours — 87 Clients 

44 trips — Avg. 46 seniors 

176 seniors benefited from these services 



IN GRATITUDE Our Center is recognized throughout the Merrimack Valley and the 
Commonwealth as one of the best. It is the result of many factions working together, sharing the 
vision, and involving themselves in the compassionate result. It is the work of the Council on 
Aging with their dedication, direction and personal support. It is the Board and members of the 
Friends of the Senior Center who unselfishly give of themselves to raise money and support the 
Center — annually contributing over $100,000 for programs, services and building improvements. 
It is our aging staff who consistently and generously brings their professional competencies and 
caring attitudes in response to the many needs of our seniors. It is the 270 active volunteers who 
quietly give of themselves throughout the year, last year contributing over 36,940 hours of 
service. It is you, the residents and taxpayers of Chelmsford, who support and believe in our 
work. It is a good feeling that flows from the human spirit. 

Thankfully submitted, 
Martin J. Walsh 
Director 



47 



Veterans 1 Emergency Fund Committee 



The Veterans' Emergency Fund was established in 1947 and has been in existence for fifty-three 
years. Various veterans of World War II have been assisted during this period of time. 
Applications for assistance should be sent to the Veterans' Agent of the town. Assistance, when 
granted after investigation and review, is in the form of material grants. No cash grants are 
approved. 

The present membership of the committee is: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Rober P Laporte 
Carl J Lebedzinski 
John J Kenney 
Thomas E Firth, Jr. 
Frederick H Reid 
Alfred H Coburn 
Allan H Greenhalgh 
Neal C Stanley 
Lloyd C Greene, Jr. 



48 



Veterans' Emergency Fund 



Treasurer's report to the board of selectmen and the town manager from January 1 st to December 
31 st , 2000. 



Balance as of 1/1/2000 $23,374.00 

Add Receipts (Interest received) $772.08 

Total $24,146.08 

ASSETS 

MassBank for Savings $24,146.08 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities $0.00 

Total Assets, less Liabilities as of December 31, 2000 $24.146.08 



Veterans Services 



Members: 

Martin J. Walsh Director 

Regina B. Jackson Assistant 

The Chelmsford Veterans' Services Office provides short-term financial assistance to eligible 
veterans and their families as mandated by Massachusetts General Law Chapter 115. We can 
assist eligible, needy veterans with a monthly allowable grant and some medical coverage. The 
amount of assistance depends on the budget standards set by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Veterans' Service. In CY2000 we averaged $4,963 per month in 
benefits paid out. The State reimbursed Chelmsford 75% of the benefits. We have about 9 
active cases per month. Our reimbursement from the State is paid quarterly and runs 
approximately 10 months behind the authorizations. 



49 



CY 2000 was an eventful year for Veterans' Services. In March we hosted a VA Health Benefits 
Enrollment Fair at the Senior Center. In July we coordinated a flag ceremony in conjunction 
with the Korean War Commemorative Community Program. This is a three-year program to 
honor our Korean War Veterans. In November we hosted the Rudolph H. LaFebvre Memorial 
Rededication ceremony in East Chelmsford. Also in November was the Clark Brothers 
Memorial dedication in North Chelmsford. These events along with the annual Memorial Day 
and Veterans' Day observances demonstrated the strong support veterans enjoy in our 
community. A veterans group meets at the Senior Center the 3 rd Thursday of each month at 1 :00 
- all are welcome. 

Our office is located in the Community Center (Old Town Hall) in Chelmsford Center. This 
office is open M/W/F 8:30 - 4:00. Our phone number is #250-5238. If you need help when the 
office is closed call Marty Walsh at the Senior Center #251-8692. If you are unable to visit our 
office and need a home visit, please call and we will be happy to schedule a convenient time. 
Thank you. 



50 



TOWN COMMITTEES & COMMISSIONS 



Arts & Technology Education Fund 



Memebers: 

Edward Morassi Financial Liaison (Chairman) 

Beverly Barrrett (Secretary) 

Evelyn S. Thoren 

George Ripsom 

Angelo Taranto 

Pamela Armstrong 

Richard Moser Superintendent Of Schools 

The 1996 Spring Town Meeting approved an amendment to their General By-Laws by adding 
Section 13 to Article VII entitled Chelmsford Arts and Technology Education Funds (ATEF). 
The purpose of this fund is to provide supplemental funding to support local educational 
initiatives and projects. Thanks to your generosity and support the ATEF has received well over 
$30,000 since its inception in November 1996. The committee is currently working on 
investment strategies and researching other financial resources in order to create a lasting fund 
and insure continued and consistent awards. 

Chelmsford is the first town to have a By-Law in place that specifies the application process, 
committee make-up and limitations. In June 2000 a seven member committee made awards to 
Elaine Farrow, Betty-Mae Flaherty, and Jeanne Manzi at the Westlands School for A Step into 
the 17th Century, Sharon Ryan at Harrington School for Grade 1 "Book Nook"; C. Panagiotakas, 
J. Rollins, S. SantaBarbara, and M. Winters at Center School for Solar System Simulator, Mary 
Donovan at Chelmsford High School for a Doll's House; Sandi Turtle and McCarthy Tech Team 
at McCarthy Middle School for Inspiration and Visual Thinking; and Marylyn Sweeney at the 
five elementary schools for Kid Video. The Spring 2001 Applications and copies of the 
applications along with the By-Law were distributed in January 2001 to each school. The 
committee received completed applications by March 31, 2001. Teachers and School Councils 
apply for these funds. Awards will be announced in June 2001 . 

The concept of using tax check-offs for an alternative funding source for education was initiated 
by Arlington's veteran Town Treasurer, John Bilafer, under a Home Rule Petition over twelve 
years ago. Since this was accepted, over fifty towns in Massachusetts have adopted the statute 
Chapter 60. Chelmsford became involved in the process of adopting Chapter 60 through the 
efforts of Anthony Volpe, a member of the Chelmsford School Committee. 

Chelmsford uses a separate tear-off sheet in the excise and real estate tax bills as the method to 
elicit voluntary contributions to enhance the education of Chelmsford Public School students. 
The collected money does not become part of the school budget. The Town Treasurer disperses 
the funds under the direction of the ATEF Committee. Information sheets are available in the 
Town Offices. 

The contributions* that you give have and will continue to make a difference in the education of 
our children ... our future taxpayers. 

These contributions may be tax deductible. Please contact your tax consultant. 



51 



Celebrations Committee 



Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 
James K. Gifford 
Robert J. Kelley 
David Marderosian 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 

The 33rd. Annual, Three Day 2000 Fourth of July Celebration was once again a Hugh Success, 
thanks to the Chelmsford Lions Club for Center Common Activities, Chelmsford Lodge of Elks 
No. 2310 for a Great Parade, Chelmsford Art Society for the Art Show, Chelmsford Community 
Band and many other Chelmsford Volunteer Organizations. Special Thanks to the Chelmsford 
Auxiliary Police and Explorers Troop who volunteered many hours. 

Many thanks to Department Heads and Personnel of the Police, Fire, Highway and Park 
Departments and Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen. 

The Celebrations Committee, is now in the Planning of the 34th. Annual Fourth of July 
Celebrations for the year 2001. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 



Cemetery Commission 



Members: 

Jean R McCaffery, Chairman 
Gerald L. Hardy 
James F. Dolan 



Cemetery Department Personnel: 

John Sousa, Jr. Superintendent 

Jorge Caires Working Foreman 

Patrick Caires Backhoe Operator 

Eduardo Correia Laborer 

Sharon Smith Part Time Clerk 



Temporary Special Laborers: Claudio Caires, Robert O'Donnell, Brian Gallagher, and Casto 
Colon 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to report the following highlights and accomplishments of 
2000 to the citizens of Chelmsford. 

During the Summer, the Cemetery staff worked in cooperation with a local contractor to restore 
water service at Pine Ridge Cemetery. Two new irrigation wells were installed replacing those 
that had been in service for 35 years. In addition, all major components were replaced at the Pine 
Ridge pumping station including two shallow well pumps and a compressor. 



52 



The Commission continued to seek grant funding from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
the historic preservation of our Town's earliest cemeteries. The Massachusetts Historical 
Commission announced that Forefathers Burying Ground was selected as one of three cemeteries 
statewide to receive a matching grant of $20,000 from the Massachusetts Preservation Projects 
Fund. Grant funds will be used to repair and reset 18 th century slate gravestones and make 
structural repairs to two above -ground tombs. 

In December, the Department of Environmental Management announced that Riverside 
Cemetery had been invited to participate in their Cemetery Preservation Initiative Program. 
Under this program, a preservation master plan will be developed for Riverside Cemetery, which 
was established in 1841, at no cost to the Town. The plan will address monument repairs, 
structural problems, and landscape improvement. 

The Cemetery Commission would like to thank Eileen Johnson for her 21 years of dedicated 
service in the Cemetery Office and extend our best wishes to her for a happy and healthy 
retirement. We would like to welcome Sharon Smith to our office staff. 

Congratulations to Patrick Caires on his promotion to the position of Backhoe Operator. The 
Commission offers our condolences to the family of Cesar de Caires who passed away in 
December. Cesar was employed at the Cemetery Department for 20 years before retiring in 1988. 
He will be missed by our staff and the many visitors who knew him by name. 

There were 156 interments during the year including 37 cremation interments which accounted 
for 24% of total interments. There were 101 cemetery lots sold during the year which represents 
a 7% decrease in lot sales over 1999. The Cemetery Commission appreciates the Department 
Staffs efforts to keep Chelmsford's six cemeteries well-maintained and attractive burial places. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Jean R. McCaffery, Chairman 



Commission On Disabilities 



The Chelmsford Commission on Disabilities held 10 meetings during the past year. Meetings are 
held in the Town Offices on the third Tuesday of each month (excluding August and December) 
at 7:30 P.M. We may be reached at 250-9689 or through the Town Web Site 
(townhall.chelmsford.ma.us). In addition "Access Issue Feedback" forms are located in the 
Town Offices, Senior Center and both Libraries. 

• With regrets The Commission accepted the resignation of Suzanne Donahue, Frederick 
Marcks, and Ralph Hickey. Mr. Hickey, ADA Coordinator for the Town of Chelmsford, 
continues his role on The Commission as an ex officio member. We are pleased to report Mr. 
Bernard Lynch, Town Manager, Has appointed Ms. Laureen Burgess, Mr. David Singer and Mr. 
Richard Johnson as members to the Commission. 



53 



• We had the opportunity to provide technical aid. equipment for VISION IMPAIRED VOTERS 
located at each precinct on November 7th for the Presidential Election. Out mission is to restore 
the ability of our vision impaired to mark their own secret ballot. An unexpected benefit was the 
opportunity for hundreds of other voters to experience a greater insight into disabilities which 
they may not have realized before. We have formed an on going subcommittee dedicated to 
researching other options for future elections. Our thanks to the Town Clerk's Office, The Board 
of Registrars and especially our Volunteers. 

• In November we were further privileged to be the Hosts for a 2-day COMMUNITY ACCESS 
MONITOR TRAINING PROGRAM presented by the Massachusetts Office on Disability. After 
many months of planning and organizing completed by the CCOD and with the help of Town 
Manager Bernard Lynch and his staff, we welcomed many Town Officials and Private Citizens 
from all over Eastern Massachusetts including Chelmsford. According to the State Office of 
MOD, the CCOD provided the most successful CAM Training Program in Eastern 
Massachusetts for the year 2000. Our Thanks to the Treasurer's Office, Accounting Department 
and Ted Godfroy, Superintendent of Public Buildings and once again to our Volunteers. 

• CCOD's Scholarship Subcommittee finalized the paperwork for a CCOD SCHOLARSHIP to 
be awarded for a 2001 graduating student with disabilities. The Application Package is available 
at C.H.S. and Nashoba Valley Tech. H.S. With over 750 disabled students in the Town of 
Chelmsford we are delighted to be contributing to some of their educational needs. Our 
appreciation to Scott Johnson, Director of Guidance and Community Student Services for his 
input and advice. 

• Along with these accomplishments we conducted "Business As Usual" addressing building, 
grounds and parking access issues as well as seeking out other opportunities to make Chelmsford 
a better place for the disabled. 

The CCOD would again like to express their appreciation to Town Manager Bernard Lynch as 
well as our Board of Selectmen Liaison Stuart Weisfeldt and many other Town Officials and 
Citizens who have supported our efforts on behalf of our Disabled Community this year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Thomas Fall - Chairman 

Len Olenchak - Vice Chairman 

Sandra Gardner Momaney - Secretary 

Marti McCuller - Treasurer 

Laureen Burgess 

Dr. John Duggan 

Richard M. Johnson 

Patricia Raynor 

David Singer 

Linda Fall -associate member 

Kathi Geisler - associate member 

Ralph Hickey - A.D.A. Coordinator 



54 



Conservation Commission 



Members: 

David McLachlan, Chairman 

Marc Grant, Vice Chairman 

John Smaldone 

Andrew Sheehan, Community Development Coordinator 

Alison McKay, Conservation Officer 



Michael Jasinski 

William Vines 

Caroline Hampton 

William R. (Bob) Greenwood 



In 2000 the Conservation Commission welcomed two new members, William Vines and 
Caroline Hampton. They replaced Jodie Borghetti and Lynne Davis. 

The Commission continued to make improvements to its reservations, town forests, and 
conservation lands. The Commission completed a forest inventory and management plan for 
Thanksgiving Forest and Russell Mill Forest. This was made possible through a Forest 
Stewardship Grant from the Department of Environmental Management. The Commission is 
now working with a consulting forester to evaluate a limited timber sale at Thanksgiving Forest 
in the winter of 2001-02. Also at Thanksgiving Forest, trails were partially reconstructed, a 
bridge was constructed across a wetland, and other improvements were made with the assistance 
and volunteer labor of the New England Mountain Bike Association. At the Lime Quarry 
Reservation, Eagle Scout candidate Josh Abbott constructed a bridge across a stream, completing 
the trail at that conservation area. Josh is one of several members of Troop 70 to complete Eagle 
Scout projects on conservation areas. 

As has been the case for several decades, the majority of the Conservation Commission's time 
was devoted to wetlands protection. The Commission reviewed a total of 62 permit applications 
under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and Chelmsford Wetlands Bylaw. Of these 
applications, 19 were Notices of Intent and 43 were Requests for Determination. In an effort to 
improve protection of wetlands in Chelmsford, the Commission successfully presented 
amendments to the Wetlands Bylaw to Town Meeting. These amendments were largely an effort 
to clarify existing provisions and eliminate inconsistencies in the Bylaw. The Commission also 
opened a dialogue with the Carlisle Conservation Commission to try to better manage the 
Cranberry Bog that straddles the common border. 



The following is breakdown of wetlands permit applications since 1997: 

1997 1998 1999 

Requests for Determination 51 48 31 

Notices of Intent 24 32 30 

Total 75 80 61 



2000 
43 
19 
62 



55 



Cultural Council 



2001 Membership: Donna Thoene, Judy Jumpp, Carol Merriam, Linda Carney, Ronalee Sayers, 
Jeff Carney, Jaci Matzkin, Carolyn Wiljanen and Carol Kelly-Suleski. The Chelmsford Cultural 
Council is comprised of nine volunteers from the Chelmsford community who are appointed by 
the town manager. 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council (CCC) is a local agency of the Massachusetts Cultural Council 
(MCC), and was established to carry out the mission of the state agency by supporting programs 
that promote access, education, diversity and excellence in the arts, humanities and interpretive 
sciences. The CCC allocates state funds for these disciplines through a local re-granting 
program. The programs which the CCC chooses to fund help to improve the quality of life for 
our residents and contribute to the economic vitality of our community. 

In 2000, the Chelmsford Cultural Council awarded 25 grants totaling $17,779. This money is 
funding Arts programs in our schools, libraries, churches, local television, and the Community 
and Senior centers. 

In addition to re-granting state funds, the Chelmsford Cultural Council continued its tradition of 
actively promoting the arts, humanities and interpretive sciences in Chelmsford through the 
following events: 

• * funded the Alan Stone Quartet on Winterfest Weekend 

• *organized and funded prize money for our annual photography contest which was displayed 
during Winterfest Weekend and enjoyed by hundreds of people 

• *commissioned and oversaw the installation of a hand-crafted Craftsman-style display cabinet 
in Adams Library. Designed an application process for potential display candidates. Preliminary 
exhibits on hand-woven baskets and hand-made books were very successful. 

• * funded Quintessential Brass at the Chelmsford Holiday Prelude festivities 

• *presented the sixth annual "Angel-of-the-Arts" awards to Berna Finley and Jim Scarth for 
their support of and dedication to cultural programs in Chelmsford. 

• *held a highly successful community input "brainstorming" session which brought together 
fifty community leaders in the Arts and Humanities to discuss projects which would benefit our 
town. 

The CCC also applied for and received $1340.00 through a Massachusetts Cultural Council 
(MCC) Matching-Funds program whereby the MCC will match some portion of any locally- 
raised funds. Our "matching" local funds came from the Town of Chelmsford. 



Submitted by Donna Thoene, Chair 



56 



Finance Committee 



Members: 

Clare Jeannotte Chairman 

William Curry Vice Chairman 

Samuel Chase 

Mary Frantz 

William Gilet, Jr. 

Dwight Hayward 

Eugene Schwamb 

The Finance Committee is comprised of seven members who are appointed by the Town 
Moderator to three-year terms. The Finance Committee is the arm of Town Meeting whose 
primary mission is to study and make recommendations on the town budget and warrant articles 
to be considered by the Town Meeting Representatives. 

There are two Town Meetings each year; the spring meeting commences on the last Monday in 
April and the fall meeting is held at the end of October. Prior to the Spring Town Meeting, the 
Town Manager presents his proposed budget and capital improvement program for the upcoming 
fiscal year with accompanying budget message and supporting documents to the Finance 
Committee. 

Each Finance Committee member acts as a liaison to various town departments and boards. Prior 
to the public hearing, the Finance Committee liaison meets individually with the department 
head to review the department' s budget request. Weekly hearings are held from December 
through April to hear, analyze and discuss departmental budgets and warrant articles. Each 
department or independent board is given the opportunity to present their budget and respond to 
questions and concerns raised by Finance Committee members. Based on its deliberations, the 
Committee makes a recommendation on each line item of the budget and each warrant article. 

Similar to the budget hearings, the Committee also meets with petitioners, proponents and other 
interested parties, whether in support or opposition of proposed warrant articles that are to be 
considered at the Spring or Fall Town Meetings. After consideration of each warrant article, the 
Committee votes on its recommendation. In certain instances, when the article has no financial 
implication to the Town, the Committee may vote to make "no recommendation" on the article. 

The recommendations of the Committee are published in the Spring and Fall Report Books, 
which are available to residents and Town Meeting Representatives. Additionally, the Report 
contains financial data specific to the Town and other useful information. 

The Finance Committee also has one or more liaisons assigned to all major capital committees 
including the School Building Needs Committee and the Police Station. The liaisons are 
responsible for keeping the Committee informed about a project's progress and financial status. 

In accordance with the Town Charter, "The duty of Town Meeting Representatives is to keep 
abreast of town business and review materials forwarded to them by the Board of Selectmen and 
Town Manager. It is expected that town meeting members will attend meetings of multiple 
member bodies, attend hearings held by the Finance Committee and actively prepare for each 
session of the town meeting." The Finance Committee both encourages and welcomes attendance 
and participation of town meeting members and residents at any of their meetings. 



57 



Historical Commission 



The Chelmsford Historical Commission has again spent the year working on several projects 
including the annual "Preservation Day," historical signs and house inventories. 

This past Preservation Day was held on the Center Common and included self tours of the 
Historic District, Forefathers" Burial Ground and Middlesex Canal Toll House. Special guests 
included a Revolutionary War reenactment group based right here in Chelmsford. Col. Knox's 
Light Artillery, which portrays an authentic Continental Army artillery unit, spent the day 
drilling, firing and giving demonstrations to the public. 

The creation and placement of historic sign markers for houses in Town more than 100 years old 
is ongoing and should accelerate in the next year. If your house or building is more than 100 
years old, contact us! 

The process of house inventories is still ongoing. It is the goal of the Historical Commission to 
have an inventory, which includes dimensions, pictures, descriptions of interesting features, etc., 
for all buildings more than 100 years old. This aspect of the Commission's work is especially 
important as many of these buildings disappear every year. 

The Commission is always looking for volunteers. If interested, leave us a note at the Town 
Clerk's office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Linda Prescott, Chairman 

John Alden 

John Goodwin 

Tory Gullion 

George Merrill 

Martha Sanders 

JeffStallard 



Historic District Commission 



Members: 

Brenda Lovering, Chairman 
Jack Handley, Vice Chairman 
Kathleen Howe 
Len Richards 

John Alden, Alternate 
Phil Currier, Alternate 
Debra Belden Arndt, Clerk 

The Historic District Commission functions as a regulatory commission for the benefit of the 
Town. A small area of the Town's center section is under the Commission's authority. The 
objective of the Historic District Commission is to provide an expeditious application and review 
relative to the physical modifications to the residences and businesses within the District. 
Regular meetings are held on the first Monday of each month at the Town Offices. 



58 



During the calendar year 2000, the Commission received 23 applications for review and 23 
applications were accepted. Two public hearings were held and 21 public hearings were waived. 
Thirteen Certificates of Appropriateness and 10 Certificates of Non- Applicability were issued 



Holiday Decorating Committee 



Committee Members 2000 
Linda Harrington, Chairman 
Tink Nussbaum, Co-Chairman 
Carol Gillette, Music 
Ellen Donovan, Treasurer 
Jean Kydd 
Jacqueline Wunschel 
Carrie Bacon 
Iris Larssen 
Ruthann Burkinshaw 
Donna Ready 
Lynn Lemaire 
Jay Cahill 
Gail Myers 



Committee Members 2001 
Linda Harrington, Chairman 
Carol Gillette, Music 
Ellen Donovan, Treasurer 
Jacqueline Wunschel 
Carrie Bacon 
Iris Larssen 
Ruthann Burkinshaw 
Donna Ready 
Lynn Lemaire 
Jay Cahill 
Gail Myers 



Departmental Mission Statement: 

The Holiday Decorating Committee is a group of volunteers who arrange and implement the 
Holiday Lighting and Prelude Ceremony in Chelmsford Center the first Sunday in December. 
The committee, with the help of several interested individuals and groups, physically put up and 
take down all the lights on the shrubs and trees on the Chelmsford common, the Old Town Hall 
and the Chelmsford Business District. In addition to the lighting the committee also organizes 
musical talent who volunteer their time, arrange the hay rides, assist "Piney the Talking Tree" 
and "Santa" with more than 500 children who come to see them. 



Budget: 

While the Town sanctions the Committee, we receive no funds and work from donations given to 
us by several groups and individuals. We are especially grateful this year to the Chelmsford 
Business Association, the Chelmsford Rotary Club, the Chelmsford Fire Union, the Chelmsford 
Police Union, The Lowell Five Cents Savings Bank and Sovereign Bank. 



Goals and Objectives: 



59 



Our goal for the year 2001 is to have the fourth hayride added to the Center Business District to 
make the waiting time less for our increasing number of participants. We will have to secure the 
necessary funds to do this but feel we will be able to obtain our goal. We have increased our 
number of musical and vocal groups over the years and hope to continue receiving their much- 
appreciated talents for the upcoming year. We thank the Police Department, Police Auxiliary, 
Fire Department and the Highway Departments for their continued help and cooperation which 
has made our event possible and a huge success. We feel fortunate to have so many residents 
support our efforts and thank all those who give so freely of their time and talents to make this 
once a year event possible. 



Linda Harrington, Chairman 



Housing Authority 



Over the past year, the Chelmsford Housing Authority has witnessed an increase in the need for 
affordable housing for families, elderly and disabled individuals. For the first time in ten years, a 
substantial award has been received from the Federal Government to increase the number of 
housing units in Chelmsford. In September, the Authority received notification that $4.7 million 
was awarded for the construction of 51 new elderly units and another $350,000 was received for 
75 new housing vouchers for families. This increase in assistance will begin the process of 
meeting the needs of the community. 

Currently, the waiting period for state aided elderly/disabled housing is as follows: 
Local/Veterans 6 months to a year, Local Residents 5 to 7 years, Non-residents 10 years or more. 
The Section 8 Program continues to assist over 250 families/elderly/disabled in the area with 
rental assistance to live in a private apartment. Our Family Self Sufficiency Program is helping 
over 45 families improve their education and skills with the hopes of moving them towards 
homeownership. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs as of December 31, 2000 provided a total of 197 
units of low-income public housing and 268 Section 8 Vouchers. 

Members of the staff include David J. Hedison, Executive Director, Linda Dalton, Assistant 
Executive Director, Michelle Hudzik, State Program Manager, Carole Chakarian Federal 
Housing Manager, Richard O'Neil, Maintenance Manager and seven additional support staff. 
Regular meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m., on the first 
Tuesday each month. The Annual Meeting is the first Tuesday in May. All meetings are open to 
the public. The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commissioners would like to thank the 
residents of Chelmsford and Town Officials for their continued support and cooperation. 

Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commissioners 

NAME TITLE TERM EXPIRES 

Scott Johnson Chairman 2003 

Lynn M. Marcella Vice Chairman 2002 

Leonard Westgate Treasurer 2001 

Denise Marcaurelle Asst. Treasurer 2004 

Pamela A. Turnbull Member 2003 

60 



Planning Board 



Members: 

Christopher Garrahan, Chairman 
Susan Carter, Vice Chairman 
Charles Wojtas, Clerk 
Pamela Armstrong 
Robert Morse 
James Good 



Kim MacKenzie 

James Pearson, Town Engineer/Director of Public Works 

Andrew Sheehan, Community Development Coordinator 

Doris McClay, Principal Clerk 

Kathryn Bianchi, Community Development Clerk 



The Planning Board is responsible for insuring that the development of land in Chelmsford meets 
the criteria set forth in state and local land use regulations. The process involves the review of 
subdivisions and site plans at a public hearing. The Planning Board strives to maintain the 
character of Chelmsford. 

The Planning Board had another busy year reviewing development projects. The Board reviewed 
commercial and industrial developments totaling approximately 567,298 square feet of floor 
space; reviewed 16 Approval Not Required plans; reviewed 6 Definitive Subdivisions; and 
reviewed 1 Preliminary Subdivision. 

The Master Plan By-law Review Committee, in a continuing effort to implement the Master 
Plan, sponsored amendments to the Zoning Bylaw governing Facilitated and Independent Senior 
Living and Outdoor Lighting at the October 2000 Town Meeting. The Board also revised its 
regulations governing fees and Site Plan and Special Permit requirements. 

The Planning Board extends its appreciation to Doris McClay for her commitment to the Board 
over the past several years. The Board welcomes Kathryn Bianchi to the Board as her 
replacement. 



61 




Planning Board 

Back: Robert Morse, James Good, Kim MacKenzie, Andrew Sheehan (Community Development Coordinator) 
Front: Pamela Armstrong, Charles Wojtas, Christopher Garrahan, Susan Carter, 
Kathryn Bianchi (Community Development Clerk) 



62 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Special Town Meeting March 27, 2000 



The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 PM at the Senior Center. The 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 127 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. The Moderator went over the rules and procedures of the 
meeting. 

Selectman Stuart Weisfeldt moved that the reading of the Constable's return of the 
warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. Selectman Stuart Weisfeldt moved that the 
reading of the entire warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
requested that two non-residents of the Nashoba Valley Technical High School Department staff 
be allowed to address the body. Superintendent Judith Klimkiewicz and Business Manager Kyle 
Keady The motion carried. 

Under Article 1. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town vote to approve the 
$25,491,326 indebtedness authorized by the District School Committee of the Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School District on March 21, 2000 for the purpose of reconstructing and adding 
to the district high school including original equipment and furnishings in connection therewith. 

The Town Manager gave a brief summary on the background of the article. Two years 
ago NVTHS came before the various communities within the district requesting capital 
expenditures. The Town Managers and Selectmen of the communities asked the School to 
review and analyze their capital needs into long-term bases, which could be budgeted over a term 
of years. The result is a comprehensive study of their needs. If the article is approved it will 
finance the improvements on a planned schedule, as requested. He then introduced 
Superintendent Judith Klimkiewicz who would explain the details of the plan to the Body. 

Superintendent Klimkiewicz came forward and made a presentation showing the 
original project cost of $30,372,270. There were cost revisions that resulted in a 16% reduction 
for a total revised project cost of $25,491,326. The project is eligible for a State grant 
reimbursement of 63%. Chelmsford's share would be 23% or $3.6 million dollars. There is a 
need for additional classroom space in order to meet the new State requirements of certain 
courses in order to graduate. These classrooms must be located in a particular area of the 
building in order to avoid the noise from the technical area of the school. Must meet the required 
ADA Acts regulations. There is a need for a Media/Theater arts wing, which would include an 
auditorium. The square footage was reduced in this particular wing along with upgrading the 
existing building when the revisions were made. Kyle Keady Business Manager at NVTHS 
explained the financial and tax impact of the project. Chelmsford's percentage is based on the 
number of students enrolled from the Town. The cost would be spread out over twenty-five 
years. The first ten years would be the most expensive then each year after a reduction would be 
seen. All seven communities had to vote approve the project by May 20th. If no vote was taken 
it was assumed that the Community is in favor of the project, however, if any one didn't vote in 
favor then the project would not go forward. The Superintendent then listed all the projects and 
on going projects that the student body of NVTHS have completed over the years that benefit 
Chelmsford. Questions were asked about the State's contribution being lower then other 
surrounding projects. The Superintendent explained that because some areas like the City of 
Lowell have a bigger minority population and more money is available for programs etc. 

63 



The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
was against the article. The Board of Selectmen supported the article. A number of 
Representatives spoke for and against the article. Some questioned the need for an auditorium. 
There are only 109 students from Chelmsford that go to NVTHS the money should be used for 
the Chelmsford Schools that would benefit many more students. Other's felt that technology is 
constantly changing and that the students should have the most up to date information and 
machinery available. This to is a Chelmsford School and the improvements should be made to it. 
The Town Manager explained that the Town could afford this project. The School has always 
been maintained and repaired within the yearly budget. He has worked it into his budget already 
and the need can be meet. This is the first time that NVTHS has come before the Town since it 
was built in the late 60's looking for support and he asked that the Body approve the article. 
Howard Goldstein the Architect of the project explained that even without the requested 
classrooms and auditorium the school needs about $19. million dollars in improvements. 
Richard Johnson asked what the recommendation of the Chelmsford NVTHS Representatives 
was? Samuel Poulten, Sharon Shannon, and Peter Bagni all unanimously recommended the 
project, and asked for support. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried. 

Under Article 2. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Fiscal Year 2000 operating budget under Article 2 of the Annual Town Meeting held on April 
26, 1999 as follows: 

Decrease Line Item #10, Cemetery Personnel Services, by $19,500 

Increase Line Item #11, Cemetery Expenses, by $19,500 

The Town Manager explained that an employee had been injured on the job. Contract 
help has been used to fill the position. The money to pay the contract help was paid from 
expenses, this article will allow the money spent to be transferred from the personnel services 
back to the expense line item. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 3. Cemetery Superintendent John Sousa moved that the Town vote to 
approve the following regulation adopted by the Cemetery Commissioners pursuant to General 
Laws Chapter 114, Section 23, by adding the following paragraph under Section VII, 
Miscellaneous: 

To preserve the distinctive characteristics of the Town's cemeteries and to promote the 
availability of burial lots for all residents of Chelmsford, the Cemetery Commission reserves the 
right to establish reasonable limits on the quantity of graves or cemetery lots that may be 
purchased by one individual or family. 



64 



John Sousa, Cemetery Superintendent explained that there has been a large increase in 
the purchasing of cemetery lots. The Town has enough land available for the next eighty years; 
however, the Town should be conservative and use the land wisely for future use. Some families 
purchase land just to have space around the lot and not for the use of actual burial. If this article 
passes it would allow the Cemetery Commissioners to review any requests for an unusual 
amount of lots purchased at one time by an individual or family. John Coppinger wanted to 
know what the actual limited number would be? John Sousa explained that there would not be 
an actual limit. Many families have different circumstances. One number may not be the best for 
all involved. This would allow a limitation to be determine if need be. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Dwight Hayward moved to waive the reading of Article 4. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 4 . David McLachlan Chairman of the Conservation Commission 
explained that the some areas would be updated to reflect the present state laws and strengthen 
the definitions already in place. It would include the Town's past practice of exempting small 
structures from being built within fifty feet of wetlands, such as tool sheds or playhouses 
provided that certain requirements are meet. It still would not allow parking lots to be 
constructed within fifty feet of wetlands, but driveways could be allowed as long as they are at 
least twenty-five feet from wetlands, but not parking lots. It also would allow buildings on lots 
less that 40,000 square feet if it doesn't effect the wetlands. This would also make minor 
corrections and adopt the States procedures for notifying abutters. A discussion took place 
concerning the exemption of small structures being built. Who monitor's the contents of these 
buildings? Oil or gasoline could be stored there and leakage could occur. David McLachlan 
explained that this concern would be expressed at the time of the exemption and it would be the 
homeowner's responsibility to comply with the concerns. The Moderator makes a point of order. 
Earlier at the beginning of the meeting he was asked about people wearing campaign buttons into 
the Town Meeting. At that time he said the buttons where not allowed. He now announced to 
the Body that buttons are not allowed to be worn within the room, and asked for the removal of 
any buttons. He then asked for various recommendations. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the article, motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

David McLachlan Chairman of the Conservation Commission moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Wetlands Bylaw, Chapter 187 of the Chelmsford Code, by making the following 
changes: 

1. Section 187-2 Definitions. 

Add the following definition of River: "RIVER - As defined in G.L. c. 131, s. 40. 

2. Section 187-4. Limitations on construction. 

Insert the following at the end of subsection A: 

"The Conservation Commission may, at its discretion, exempt a shed, playhouse, or other 
structure from this definition provided it is built on footings requiring no more than four (4) 
square feet cumulative ground disturbance and has a footprint no larger than one-hundred-forty- 
four (144) square feet." 



65 



B. Insert the following at the end of subsection A: "For the purposes of this chapter a 
parking lot shall be defined as a paved area containing 10 or more parking spaces. The term 
parking lot shall not be interpreted to include drives, fire lanes, or other appurtenances. Any such 
drives, fire lanes, or appurtenances shall be clearly marked 'no parking'. Parking areas which 
provide fewer than 10 parking spaces shall not be subject to Section 187-4." 

The amended section will read: "The construction of any building, as defined herein, on any lot 
having an area of 40,000 square feet or more or any parking lot containing 10 or more parking 
spaces shall be prohibited within 50 feet of any resource area. The Conservation Commission 
may, at its discretion, exempt a shed, playhouse, or other structure from this definition provided 
it is built on footings requiring no more than four (4) square feet cumulative ground disturbance 
and has a footprint no larger than one-hundred-forty-four (144) square feet. For the purposes of 
this chapter a parking lot shall be defined as a paved area containing 10 or more parking spaces. 
The term parking lot shall not be interpreted to include drives, fire lanes, or other appurtenances. 
Any such drives, fire lanes, or appurtenances shall be clearly marked 'no parking'. Parking areas 
which provide fewer than 10 parking spaces shall not be subject to Section 187-4." 

C. Insert the following at the end of subsection C: 

"The Commission may, at its discretion, issue a permit for a parcel which qualifies as a 
grandfathered lot under G. L. c. 40 A, s. 6, if it specifically finds that the interests of this chapter 
are protected." The amended section will read: "The Commission shall be prohibited from 
issuing a permit for any parcel where at least 80% of the lot area required by Chapter 195, 
Zoning, Table of Dimensional Requirements, Minimum Lot Requirements, is not contiguous 
land other than that under any water body or bog, swamp, wet meadow, marsh or any other 
wetland as defined in MGL c. 131, s. 40. The Commission may, at its discretion, issue a permit 
for a parcel which qualifies as a grandfathered lot under G. L. c. 40A, s. 6, if it specifically finds 
that the interests of this chapter are protected." 

D. Insert a new subsection E which reads: 

"E. The Commission shall not allow any impervious surface within 25' of any resource area. The 
Commission may waive this requirement if it specifically finds that the interests of this chapter 
are protected." 

3 . Section 1 87-7. Notice of intent. 

A. Delete "Notice of Intent" and "notice" where they appear in subsections A-D of this 
section and insert "Application for Permit" in their place. 

B. Delete subsection E which reads: 

"Notice of the public hearing shall be sent by the applicant by certified mail to all parties in 
interest. Parties in interest shall mean the petitioner, abutters, owners of land directly opposite on 
any public or private street or way and abutters to abutters within 300 feet of the property line of 
the petitioner or the boundary of the wetland area under consideration, whichever is greater, all 
as they appear on the most recent applicable tax list, notwithstanding that the land of any such 
owner is located in another city or town." 

and insert the following in its place: 



66 



"E. Any person filing a notice of intent shall at the same time give written notification thereof, 
by delivery in hand or certified mail, return receipt requested, to all abutters and abutters to 
abutters within 300 feet of the property line of the land where the activity is proposed, at the 
mailing addresses shown on the most recent applicable tax list of the Assessors, including but not 
limited to owners of land directly opposite said proposed activity on any public or private street 
or way, and in another municipality or across a body of water. Said notification shall be at the 
applicant's expense, and shall state where copies of the notice of intent may be examined and 
obtained, and where information regarding the date, time, and place of the public hearing may be 
obtained, and shall include all available information regarding the date, time, and place of the 
public hearing. Proof of said notification, with a copy of the notice mailed or delivered, shall be 
filed with the Conservation Commission." 

4. Section 187-8. Public hearing. 

A. Delete "Notice of Intent" where it appears in this section and insert "Application for 
Permit" in its place. 

B. Delete "the Board of Health, Board of Appeals and Planning Board." from the second 
sentence. 

The amended section will read: "The Commission shall hold a public hearing on the application 
within 21 days of the filing of the Application for Permit. Notice of the date, time and place of 
the hearing shall be given by the Commission, at the expense of the applicant, not less than five 
days prior to the hearing, by publication in a newspaper of general circulation in Chelmsford and 
by mailing a notice to the applicant. Such hearing may be held at the same time and place, as any 
public hearing required to be held under MGL c. 131, s. 40. If the Commission determines that 
additional data or information is necessary, the hearing may be continued to a future date." 

5. Section 187-10. Order of conditions. 

A. Delete "Order of Conditions" where it appears in this section and insert "Permit" in its 
place. 

B. Delete subsection B which reads: "B. If the Commission determines that the area which 
is the subject of the application is not significant to the interests protected by this chapter or that 
the proposed activity does not require the imposition of conditions, it shall issue a permit without 
conditions within 21 days of the public hearing. The applicant and all others who have received 
notice of such hearing by mail shall be notified of such determination within 21 days after said 
hearing." 

6. Section 187-15. Recording. Delete "statement of compliance" and insert "certificate of 
compliance" 

The Moderator made a point of order. He was the sponsor of the next article. At this 
time the Town Clerk Mary St.Hilaire would preside over the meeting as Acting Moderator, in 
order for him to be able to present the article and answer any and all questions. He read the 
article to the Body before he stepped down as Moderator. 

Under Article 5. Dennis McHugh Town Moderator moved that the Town vote to amend the 
first paragraph of Section 2-5 [c] lowering the attendance requirement to avoid involuntary 
termination and delete the second paragraph of Section 2-5 [c] from the Charter [added in 1993] 
establishing a right of appeal when attendance requirements at Town Meeting have not been met. 

Delete the current provision, which reads as follows: 
67 



"Section 2-5 Vacancies... 

...[c] Forfeiture of Office 

If a person elected as a town meeting member shall fail to take the oath of office within 
thirty days following the election of such person, or shall fail to attend more than one half of the 
sessions of the Town Meeting held in a calendar year, the member shall be deemed to have 
resigned and the member's office shall be declared vacant. Any such vacancy shall be filled as 
provided in section 2-5 [d]. 

Any Town Meeting member, who shall fail to attend more than one half of the sessions of the 
Town Meetings held in a calendar year, may appeal the declaration of vacancy by requesting a 
hearing on the removal. A request for hearing shall be in writing and shall be filed with the 
Town Clerk on or before January 15 th of the following calendar year. A hearing shall be held 
before a committee consisting of the Town Clerk, Town Moderator and Town Counsel to be held 
no later than January 25 th of said year. Upon the showing of good cause by the member, the 
committee may excuse one or more absences and may rescind the Declaration of Vacancy 
provided the Town Meeting member has attended at least one-half of the unexcused sessions of 
the Town Meeting during said calendar year."[Sic] 

Insert the new provision, which will read as follows: 

"Section 2-5 Vacancies... 

...[c] Forfeiture of Office 

If a person elected as a Town Meeting Representative shall fail to take the oath of office 
within thirty days following the election of such person, or shall fail to attend at least one half of 
the sessions of the Town Meeting held in a calendar year, the Representative shall be deemed to 
have resigned and the Representative's office shall be declared vacant. Any such vacancy shall 
be filled as provided in section 2-5 [d]." 

The Moderator Dennis McHugh explained the purpose of the hearing process. It was the 
intent of the Charter Commission to make Town Meeting Members accountable for their 
attendance. Originally there was no excuse process. It came about after a member had missed 
Town Meeting due to illness. The amendment was voted. Presently, a Town Meeting Member is 
notified that they are being dismissed if they've failed to attend more than half the meetings held 
in the calendar year. If they want to appeal, the member must notify the Committee in writing, 
stating the reason or reasons for missing the meeting or meetings. A hearing is held and the 
Committee is allowed to excuse the member. It has been the feeling of the Committee that due 
to the number of meetings held in the year are becoming less and less this process should be 
revisited. This past year there were only three meetings and a member had to attend at least two 
out of the three before the member's excuse could be addressed. If the wording "more than 
half is changed to at least half the meetings then in most cases there would be no need for any 
hearing process. If a member is removed in January, then he or she can pull papers and run for 
the unexpired term in April. There would be no need for the Committee to judge a member's 
excuse. They may be accused of being bias, and this would eliminate that all together. The 
Acting Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. Christopher 
Garrahan spoke against the article. Roger Sumner spoke against the article. John Emerson 
questioned if this could be done constitutionally. Joel Bard Town Counsel said that it is already 
in the Charter originally, this would just be addressing the attendance issue. It was questioned if 
a Special Town Meeting is held within the Annual Meeting does this count for two meetings? 

68 



The Acting Moderator said no it only counts as one meeting. Why is this? It was explained that 
the Representatives check in only once. The Acting Moderator then asked if there was a need to 
hear further debate, hearing none she asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. The Acting 
Moderator declared the motion carried, by recognizing the 2/3's rule. Dennis McHugh 
returned to the Chair and proceeded to move on to Article 6. Roger Sumner made a point of 
order and questioned the vote. The Moderator explained that the Moderator is allowed to 
recognize that a 2/3's vote has taken place without taking an actual hand count. If seven people 
question the vote then the hand count will be taken. Other Town Meeting Representatives 
questioned the count. The following tellers came forward and a hand count was taken: 

Dorothy Frawley, Lucy Simonian, Patricia Plank, John Maleski. The result of the hand count 
was 89 Yes 37 No 2/3's is 84, the motion carried. 

Under Article 6. Susan Carter of the Planning Board moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Chelmsford Code, Chapter 195, Zoning, Section 195-3, formerly Section 2111, 
Official Zoning Map, to change from RA Single Residence to P Public, the parcel of land off 
Penni Lane identified in the Assessors records as Map 42, Lot 2, containing approximately 6 
acres of land. 

The Town Manager explained that the purpose of this article was a proposal to re-zone a 
parcel of land that contained six acres located off Penni Lane, presently used by the Boy Scouts. 
Currently there is a lawsuit that the Town and the Boy Scouts are working through the courts, 
regarding the ownership and right of the Boy Scouts to sell the property. This particular article is 
separate from the Court case. The intent of the article is simple. This parcel has been used for 
possibly fifty plus years as open space. This property abuts another piece of public zoned land. 
It is the Board's intention to maintain the land for the purpose of the public zone according to the 
by-law and not be developed for residential. This is a use question really separate from the Court 
case pending. It's the Board's intent to preserve the property, keep it as public land and not 
develop it, regardless of the pending lawsuit. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. Susan Carter read the Planning Board's 
recommendation: The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing on 
March 22, 2000 on the above mentioned article after advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford 
Independent on March 2, 2000 and March 9, 2000, a minimum of 14 days before the hearing. A 
copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the appropriate agencies, as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40 A, Section 5. At the meeting on March 22, 2000, The 
proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the merits of this Zoning By-law change. 
It is the opinion of the Planning Board that changing the zoning from RA - Single Residence to 
P - Public would be in keeping with the intent of the Master Plan, would promote Open Space 
and would maintain this land in the general manner in which it has been used for at least the past 
50 years. The Planning Board voted unanimously (5-0) to recommend this article. 

The Moderator asked that Attorney John Skelton who is representing the Boy Scouts be 
allowed to address the Body, motion carried. John Coppinger asked when did this go to Court. 
The Town Manager said that the Selectmen made the decision in January after being notified by 
the Boy Scout that they were going to sell the property. There is a schedule Court date in 
August. Sandra Martinez questioned what could go on the property if this article passed. 
Agricultural, non-profit educational. Roger Sumner questioned why not make it conservation 
land, then it would definitely be kept undeveloped. The Town Manager looked into it, however, 
because it abuts public owned land controlled by the water department, he felt it would look like 
spot zoning. This would merely be an extension of the public zone. Susan Gates asked Attorney 
Skelton if there was public land that abuts this property? He says that there wasn't any. The 
69 



Town Manager said that there was a dispute with the tax maps and there was public land. 
Attorney Skelton asked to address the Body. He explained that he was with the Boston Law firm 
of Bingham Dana. His firm was representing on a pro bono basis, the Yankee Clipper Counsel 
who was the successor of the merging of the formerly known as the Greater Lowell Council. 
There is a history. This property has come before Town Meeting twice already. Presently there 
is a legal dispute over certain languages. The Boy Scouts enter into a purchase and sale with the 
Key Foundation. This is a charitable organization whose purpose was to provide financial and 
other support for scouting programs. He notified Town Counsel, Kopleman and Paige and 
worked out a schedule knowing that the Town wanted to challenge the purchase and sale. In 
January of 2000, the Town did sue pertaining to the issue of deed restrictions and language in the 
deed, whether it is enforceable. The Town and Scouts gave extensive briefings to the land court. 
Most recently the Attorney General's office was being brought in because of the charitable trust 
question. A hearing date has been set for August 1 st . This will determine if the Scouts have the 
right to sell the property. The Boy Scouts do not believe this article is separate from the land 
court case. It does effect ownership intent; it does effect what can be done to the property. If 
this is approved it will mean that additional litigation will take place to determine this. He feels 
that the proposal is spot zoning. If this was a regulatory taking there is a process to take land for 
conservation or open space, if the intent is to regulate or restrict the land for open space. The 
Boy Scouts want the Court process to run its course and let the judicial system decide once and 
for all what the language in the deed really means and whether or not the Boy Scouts have full 
ownership and can sell the property, if they are not the owner then end of story. They believe 
that the zoning proposal is premature and asked Town Meeting not to approve it. 

John Emerson questioned the assessed value of the property. Town Counsel Joel Baird 
explained that definition of spot zoning. This is a spot of land that will be rezoned. It is 
commonly used for preserving open space or conservation land. This is for a public purpose will 
not benefit an individual owner this is for the greater public benefit. Barry Balan questioned 
what the amount of the sale was. Attorney Skelton explained that the Key foundation would pay 
$1000 at the closing then $1 1,500 on a promissory note. If the Key Foundation generates in the 
future any additional proceeds then those proceeds would be applied to benefit Camp Wataka in 
Northwood NH. Glenn Thoren spoke in favor of the article. Felt that the intent was to allow the 
Scouts to use the land for camping and not building houses. John Wilder asked that the Body 
not vote tonight, wait and se what the court action is, then vote to change. Fred Gates asked 
what the extend of the financial liability would be to the Town if the article passes. Town 
Counsel Joel Baird explained that a lawsuit could occur if the court does find that the Scouts own 
the land. Brian Latina questioned who was on the Board of the Key Foundation. Attorney 
Skelton said that he didn't have a listing but by contacting the Secretary of State the information 
could be found in the Corporation division. Jeff Stallard spoke in favor of going ahead with the 
re-zoning now and deal with the Court action at a later date if it is unfavorable. Samuel Poulten 
moved the question. The Moderator asked if there was a need to hear further debate? Hearing 
none he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. He then 
asked for a show of hands on the motion, and declared the motion carried, by recognizing the 
2/3 's rule. 



70 



Dwight Hayward moved to adjourned the meeting. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked the Town Representatives to clean up their tables, and the meeting adjourned at 
10:30 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



Annual Town Meeting April 24, 2000 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 PM at the Senior Center. The 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 158 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. The Moderator went over the rules and procedures of the 
meeting. He pointed out the fire exits located in the room. 



The Moderator announced that the following people who had served on various boards 
had passed away since the fall meeting: Selectman Howard Humphrey, Library Trustee James 
Decker, and School Committee Member Myra Silver. He asked for a moment of silence in their 
memory. 



Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the reading of the Constable's return of the 
warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the 
reading of the entire warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 1. Selectman Philip M. Eliopoulos moved that the Town hear reports of 
the Town Officers and Committees. 



State Representative Carol Cleven came forward and gave a report to the Body on the 
progress of events and bills that had taken place since last year's report and some were just voted 
on last week. She reported on the various funding. Educational funds were increased from last 
year. The Lottery will be level funded. The Quinn bill will be pretty much fully funded. No 
change in the chapter 70 formula this year, probably next year. Areas that are also a priority are 
Dalton and North Rd traffic lights, Chelmsford Center lights, reading program, and Chapter 90. 



Dr Richard Moser said that there was no recommendation at this time regarding the 
Facilities and Building Needs Committee. There are several more meetings to be held. It is a 
fifteen member Board. The Board will make recommendations in June to the School Committee 

71 



who will deliberate on a short and long term facility plan and will come back to Town Meeting 
seeking approval for something specific. So far the Committee has touched upon the issues of 
Enrollment Demography, Condition of Buildings, Educational environment and came up with 
these points of agreement. The enrollment projection by 2006-07 will be an increase of 460 
students then the rate will stabilization and decline. The Immigration issue will be addressed. 
Grades 5-8 are in immediate need of added space. Temporary classrooms should alleviate the 
middle school needs through 2005-2006. A long-range plan needs to be developed for the middle 
school regarding space within the next 3-4 years. Added temporary classrooms may be needed 
at the Elementary schools within the next 5-6 years. He listed the related points of growing 
agreement. Proposals to expand to full day kindergarten program will be delayed until new 
statewide initiatives are in place. A centralized facility for pre-school program will meet program 
needs. There is a need to develop a prioritized plan for extraordinary maintenance for the 
buildings. The quality of educational facilities needs to be in any long-range plan. The Building 
Needs Committee has considered all the DRA Options. One fiscally responsible plan will be 
presented to the School Committee for final approval in the immediate future. The Town 
Manager agreed basically with the report. A real agreement is that the Buildings do need work. 
A million and half dollars has been put aside starting next year for building maintenance, over 
and above other school needs. There is a need for additional space at the middle school level. In 
the future there still will be a need for a major project, which will have to come before the voters 
for approval. Whether it is to address some of the program issues, or doing something with the 
science wing or auditorium at the High School, or address the Middle School teaming space or 
some type of expansion at the Middles School. There are an array of issues that still need to be 
worked on prior to making any recommendation to the School Committee. 



David McLachlan questioned if the Planning Board was able to make a report tonight 
regarding the required annual review and evaluation of the effectiveness and progress of the 
Master Plan. The Town Manager said he wasn't aware of any report at this time, but would look 
into it and alert the Board to present one at the Fall meeting. 



The Moderator explained that seeing that there was only ten minutes left before the 
scheduled Special Town Meeting, Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved to postpone the 
consideration of Article 2 until resumption of the Annual Town Meeting at the conclusion of the 
Special Town Meeting. The Finance Committee was in favor of the motion. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the motion. The Moderator asked for vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 3. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town transfer $7,500 
from Conservation fees under Wetlands Special Reserve Fund to reduce the Conservation 
Commission for Budget Fiscal Year 2001. 



The Town Manager explained that this is a yearly article. The money is used to offset the 
conservation budget. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for any further 
discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

72 



Under Article 4. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town transfer 
$1,448,000 from Sewer Betterments, Special Revenue, to reduce the exempt portion of debt and 
interest in the Fiscal Year 2001 Budget. 



The Town Manager explained that this is an ongoing long-term policy to utilize funds 
from the sewer project to reduce the debt of the sewer project. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked if there was any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 5. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town transfer from 
Sewer Rate Relief Funds, Special Revenue, $124,746 to reduce the exempt portion of debt and 
interest in the Fiscal Year 2001 Budget and $232,000 to acquire the following sewer equipment 
otherwise funded by sewer user fees: 



Sewer Vacuum/Flush Truck $145,000 

One Ton Sewer ServiceTruck w/ crane $ 42,000 

Sewer/Drain Video Inspection Camera $ 45,000 



The Town Manager explained that this is a portion of the money from the State used to 
offset the sewer construction. Instead of using all the money for betterments it was decided to 
use the money to buy capital planning equipment rather then fund the items with user fees 
money. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for any further discussion, 
hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 6. The Town Manager moved to withdraw this article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as 
follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town transfer from the Stabilization Fund 
$200,000 to be used to balance the Annual Operating Budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
2000. 



Under Article 7. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town raise and 
appropriate $150,000 to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, 
as provided in General Laws Chapter 40, Section 6. 



73 



The Town Manager explained that this is money managed by the Finance Committee. It 
is to be used for extreme causes or extraordinary events. The Finance Committee recommended 
the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was 
any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 8. Cemetery Superintendent John Sousa moved that the Town transfer 
$18,000 from the sale of the Graves and Lots to the Cemetery Improvement and Development 
Fund. 

Superintendent John Sousa explained that this is a yearly article. This allows the department to 
develop the cemeteries for the future without using capital funds. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked if there was any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 9. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town raise and 
appropriate $19,000 to engage a private accounting firm to prepare an audit of all accounts in all 
departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 



The Town Manager explained that this is a required yearly article. The Town must have its 
books audited every year. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for any further 
discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 



The Town Manager moved to recess the Annual Town Meeting until the closer of the 
scheduled Special Town Meeting. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 8:30 PM. 



Special Town Meeting April 24, 2000 



The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 8:30 PM at the Senior Center. The 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 158 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of the warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. Selectman Philip 
Eliopoulos moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously 



Under Article 1. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town designate the 
property located at One Executive Drive, Chelmsford, Massachusetts and shown on Assessor's 
74 



Map 54, Lot 179-1 as an Economic Opportunity Area, pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 23 A 
of the General Laws and further, to approve the Project Certification Application submitted by 
Unisphere Solutions, Inc. for said parcel and the Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Exemption 
agreement, as approved by the Town Manager, for a period of twenty years with 5% exemption 
of increase in valuation for Year 1 and a 5% exemption of the valuation for Years 2 through 20 
inclusive. This approval is for the information contained in both the EOA Application and the 
Project Certification Application that confirms: the project, as proposed, is consistent with and 
can reasonably be expected to benefit significantly from inclusion in the Economic Opportunity 
Area; and the project as described in the Project Certification Application, will increase 
employment opportunities for residents of the Town of Chelmsford, thereby reducing blight, 
economic depression and reliance on public assistance; and the Town requests that the project be 
designated as a Certified Project for a term of twenty (20) years. 



The Town Manager explained that this is the first time that the Town has encountered 
this type of project. The State has established 35 economic areas throughout the State. 
Chelmsford is not one of the areas, however Lowell is. The Town was approached several 
months ago by Unisphere and asked for joint assistance in having this economic redevelopment 
target area extend to this one parcel for Unisphere. It would make available to Unisphere a State 
equipment tax investment credit, which would be issued from the State and not the Town, or the 
City of Lowell. It is a growing company with 200 to 250 employees. Unisphere plans on 
increasing their work force with 250 more employees. The Town would provide a 5% exemption 
on the valuation increase of the property as a result of the project, which would be $42,000. A 
5% exemption would be $2,100. The Company agreed to give that amount back to the town in 
the form of a payment in lieu of taxes. The Town would lose $2,100.in taxes but pick it up in 
other revenue source. There will be 250 jobs offered to Chelmsford and Lowell residents. The 
company's computers when replaced will be donated evenly between the City of Lowell and the 
Town of Chelmsford. These would more than likely go to the School Department. It must also go 
before the City of Lowell for approval, if approved by Chelmsford. The Moderator asked for 
questions. Mark Connors questioned if this was a legal precedence being established. Town 
Counsel John Georgio explained that the Town has the authority to decide which projects to 
provide this TIF agreement to. The Town is not under any obligation to make this action 
available in the future. Is this article based on the contingency that the program continues with 
the State? The Town Manager explained that the Town would still provide the tax exemption, 
however if they ever didn't make the payment in lieu of taxes, the exemption would go away. 
The Town Manager asked that non-resident Anthony Gudas be allowed to come forward and 
address the Body. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried. 
Anthony Gudas representing Unisphere Solutions came forward and briefly explained the 
project. It was a starter up company; a number of the jobs will be technology in nature, and 
administration. A number of jobs will be in excess of $80,000. The Company will actively 
recruit Lowell and Chelmsford residents. By entering into this agreement with the Town it will 
allow Unisphere to take advantage of the 5% State investment tax credit. Which would be 5% 
based on their companies capital investment based of machinery and equipment made in the 
Town. If the Company spends 50 million dollars it would be a 2.5 million-dollar tax credit that 
will be utilized over the next ten years. David McLachlan questioned where this location was. 
The Manager explained that the main access would be from Executive Dr from the Lowell 
Connector. David McLachlan questioned if it would be discriminatory to give an employment 

75 



preference. Town Counsel said it would not be cause for action, only if you were giving 
preference to a protected class, which is, protect under the Civil Rights statue. Peter Lawlor 
wanted to know if the company is sold would this agreement go to the new owner? The Town 
Manager said it would not. It would be limited only to Unisphere at this location. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked if there was any need for any further discussion. Dennis Sheehan spoke against 
the article. He felt that a preference was being set regarding tax credits and loss revenue. Traffic 
was also a concern. The Moderator asked for vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 



Under Article 2. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that that the Town amend the 
Fiscal Year 2000 Operating Budget as voted under Article 2 of the Annual Town Meeting held 
on April 26, 1999 as amended by the vote passed under Article 8 of the Annual Town Meeting 
held on October 18 1999, and under Article 2 of the Special Town Meeting held on March 27, 
2000, by making the following changes: 



Increase Line Item #16, Undistributed Expenses, $660,233. 



And that the Town transfer and appropriate $200,356 from unappropriated State Aid and 
$416,167 from Overlay Surplus, and reduce Line Item #18, Debt-Interest of the Fiscal Year 2000 
Operating budget by $43,710, to defray such changes. 



The Town Manager explained the article. He cited that undistributed costs are an area 
where items aren't split between departments, they are lumped together. One major area is 
insurance, such as workman compensation and property and causality liability policy. It has 
increased due to the purchasing of a new policy. By taking advantage of a new product this 
allowed the elimination of service agreements on equipment within the Town Departments. 
There was a saving of $20,000. however the policy was paid for out of the insurance account and 
the savings went to the various departments. The other area is employee benefits. Specifically 
the Medicare tax. Municipalities were exempt, but in the mid 1980's municipalities had to start 
paying into the program under the social security reform bill of 1986. Due to new employees 
coming on the rate goes up. Also, Medical Chapter 32B, which is the Health Insurance for the 
employees, has gone up. Costs have gone up and cited Harvard with a 27% increase; while the 
other carriers have cited a 12 to 18% increase. For a number of years the employees and retirees 
have been healthy. Suddenly this year there has been a dramatic increase in large claims. The 
Town is self-insured under a number of plans. The Town buys reassurance that covers the Town 
for anything over $75,000 per person. The Town is responsible for the first $75,000. This is an 
area that is a real problem for this fiscal year and for the next fiscal year and the foreseeable 
future. Presently the Manager is working with the employees towards restructuring the health 
insurance program. These issues may be re-addressed at the Fall Town Meeting. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. George 
Merrill made a point to the Body that 56% of the undistributed expenses Medical is attributed to 
teachers, therefore there is 1.8 5 million dollars that doesn't show in the School Budget. The 

76 



Moderator asked if there was any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



The Moderator declared the Special Meeting adjourned and moved to re-convene the 
adjourned annual town meeting at 9:05 PM. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 2. The Moderator read the entire article citing the individual line items 
with a total figure of $69,719,570. 



The Town Manager explained the budget. He cited the changes and increases that had 
been made to the Finance Committee's budget book. The figures read reflect the changes. He 
also pointed out his budget book and the award that was presented by the Government Finance 
Officers Association to the Town of Chelmsford. He credited the various department heads and 
his Assistant John Coderre for achieving this award. It meets all the GOA requirements and 
goals. 

The Manager then proceeded to explain where the money to run the town comes from: 
local taxes, local receipts, state aid, and available funds. He showed a listing to the body that 
reflected the revenues history from 1997 to the proposed 2001 budget. He then explained where 
the money goes. 46.6% goes to: public safety, public works, community services, undistributed, 
debt and interest, warrant articles, non-appropriated expenses, municipal administration, 53.4% 
is spent on public education. The amount spent on public education does not include the amount 
of undistributed cost such as health insurance or debt service. It is strictly the amount spent on 
the public schools plus Nashoba and the Charter Schools. He then showed a breakdown of the 
past expenditures and explained their increases from 1997 to the FY2001. There are areas of 
concern. He stressed being careful. The Town has made sizable commitments to facilities, to 
staffing and growth of programs in the School Department and we should work to continue to 
support these. But we should recognize that revenues are beginning to slow down, and there are 
uncontrollable costs in undistributed expenses that must be watched. 



Dr Richard Moser came forward and discussed the school budget. He cited the figures 
from a budget comparison FY99-00/FY00-01 hand out. The budget increased $2,406,025. or 
6.7% increase. State aide increased 15.9% and was very much appreciated. The Town's share 
increased 4.8%. He went over some highlights of a needs budget, which includes 127 more 
students. The needs budget is $38,234,025 or $2,406,025. greater than the Town Manager's 
projected budget of $38,123,850. He went on to say that the budget increase is due to the 
increase in contracted salary related expenses of $1,089,704. in new staff, $574,409. and 
expenses $741,921. He went over the increases. Teachers were added for grades 5/6, High 
School Core teachers, Alternative program at the Parker School received additional teachers and 
staff. A Security guard for the High School. Two positions were being added to support the 
MCAS tests. Two positions are being added to the Technology program. He went over the 
requested increases in expenses. Special Education program and transportation, transportation, 
computers, utilities, textbooks, 504 disabilities and advertising. He then listed the areas/positions 
that the School Committee supported to increase. Musical instruments $20,000. Guidance and 
testing, $4,000. Curriculum staff development, $14,000. Athletic Director, $14,000. Custodial 

77 



Supplies $9,600. This reflected an increase of $1 10,175. which if necessary would be deducted 
from the budget if not voted . The Moderator then read a motion presented by the School 
Committee. Mary Jo Griffin moved to amend line item 3 Chelmsford School Department 
Expense $38,234,025. To allow town meeting representatives an opportunity to consider an 
additional $110,175. without adversely affecting any town departments' budget voted by this 
body. 



David McLachlan questioned why the building maintenance budget was declining, when 
all the other areas where being level funded or increased. Robert Cruickshanck , Business 
Manager of the School Department explained that this had to do with the modular units at the 
South Row School. Paul Gleason questioned the Town Manager about the Chapter 32B 
Insurance Costs. The Manager explained that the figure shown is a projection of what the cost 
could be. An adjustment will most likely be addressed at the October meeting, once the 
premium figures are all in. Dean Carmaris questioned the Computer line, he wanted to know 
what the difference was between computer expenses and the computer capital expenses. Bernie 
DiNatalie the School Department's MIS Director explained that this is money that was cut in 
previous years from the elementary schools if restored it would be used towards a computer lab 
at the High School and restore computers at the elementary school level. Dennis Sheehan 
questioned the electrical expense. The Town Manager explained that the Town now purchases 
its electricity through Select Energy under the Deregulation Act. It saves the town money. 
Dennis Sheehan questioned where the savings were under the school budget. Robert 
Cruickshank explained that due to the modular units being added at the Parker and McCarthy, 
these units will require heat, air conditioning, and lights. $12,000 for each location, about 
$1,200. a month. Also because the Center School will be included in the budget. Mark 
Connor's questioned the security guard position. Dr Moser explained that there is already a male 
security guard, this would add a female guard. Leonard Doolan wanted to know what long term 
planning is being done? Dr Moser said that the Facility Study Committee would come up with a 
plan. Will Perry questioned the custodial positions under the Town Manager's budget. The 
Town Manager explained that these are not new positions, just a change in title due to 
classification. The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee did not recommend the article as amended. The Board of Selectmen were not in 
favor of the motion to amend. Selectman Eliopoulos said that the Town Manager wanted to 
address the motion to amend. The Town Manager said he was opposed to the motion to amend 
with regret. Over the years he has been a long time advocate for increase spending to the school 
because of the issue of improving the schools and due to the increase enrollment. Not only from 
a budgetary view but also from a capital improvement view. He supported Center School project 
and increase in technology. He gave a brief presentation highlighting certain questions. Is the 
Town committed to its schools? He listed the budget increases for FY92-FY00. Chelmsford 
Schools +61% Remainder of Town +44%. In eight years the School Department has been 
increased by $16 million dollars. He then cited various departmental increases. The Police 
budget was $2.6 million dollars in 1992; it's now $4 million. The Fire Department was $2.8 
million dollars; it's now $3.6 million dollars. DPW was $3.9 million dollars; it's projected for 
2001 to be $4.3 million dollars. The Town has meet or exceeded the projection for FY00. He 
gave an example. In 1995 the projected enrollment from the School Department for FY00, was 
6,042 students with a cost of $33,999,125. The current enrollment is 5,666 students and the 
Town is spending $35,828,000.and there are 400 less students. In the past money is allocated at 
the Fall meeting towards the school department. It has been the Town Manager's policy to give 

78 



100 % of the Medicaid money to the School Department. Currently there is legislation on 
Beacon Hill that would make it mandatory for cities and towns to give their school departments 
50% of the returned Medicaid monies. He then listed the actual costs like health insurance and 
debt figures that are being paid for under the Town's budget. Are there any areas in the school 
budget where funds can be found? The Manager said the area of utility costs. It is an area that 
shows being overbudgeted. The money is not being spent on utilities, it is being spent some 
where else. He listed the figures spent from 1997 to 1999, which shows an excess of $100,000. 
Gasoline is another area, and he cited the figures again an excess of $100,000. overbudgeted. 
The Town Manager didn't want to imply that its not needed, however this does lend itself to 
some difficult analyst to try and determine where the money being spent. He understands when 
Bob Cruickshank says that the money was spent for Special Education. If that's the case then it 
should be put under Special Education and not the utility line item. Bob Cruischank responded to 
the Manager's figures. He cited his budgeted figures and the savings for each year. He said the 
total amount saved was $160,000. His figures are the ones reported to the State. The Town 
Manager said that the point is $110,000 increase may not be a lot, however, it would be. After 
various line items have been eliminated that can't be moved around in the Town's budget there 
would be $17,900,000. It would be easier to find it in a $38,000,000 budget where line items can 
be moved around. We must look at the Town's financial problems that must be faced in the 
future do to the undistributed debt What is the financial condition of the Town? Are we spending 
enough? The State says we must spend $34,584,825. The Town spends $36,655,679. or 
$2,070,085 more. The Schools do have funding flexibility. The Town has historically supported 
the schools with initial and supplementary budgets. The Town exceeds state requirements, it 
measures well with other schools. The Town is facing financial uncertainly. Uncertain in the 
area of revenues and undistributed cost. All departments must have certain limits and make their 
best efforts to stretch funding and the schools are no exception. He felt it was important to 
illustrate the commitment that the Town has made. It disturbs him to hear that the Town is not 
doing enough. The Town is doing quite a bit. He asked that the Body defeat the motion to 
amend. 



Robert Hall moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked if there was any 
need to hear further debate, hearing none, he asked for a show of hands. He declared that the 
motion carried by recognizing the 2/3's vote by-law. He then asked for a show of hands on the 
motion to amend the article, motion defeated. He then asked for show of hands on main motion 
as presented, motion carried. The article reads as follows: 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$69,719,570 to defray Town charges for the fiscal period July 1, 2000 to June 30, 2001 
according to the following line items: 

Municipal Administration 

Personnel Services $1,308,720 

Expenses $642,734 

Chelmsford School Department $38,123,850 

Nashoba Technical High School $834,475 

Public Safety 

Personnel Services $7,494,951 

79 



Expenses 

Public Works 

Personnel Services 
Expenses 
Offset Receipts 
TOTAL 

Sewer Commission Expenses 

Cemetery 

Personnel Services 
Expenses 

Community Services 

Personnel Services 
Expenses 



Library 



Personnel Services 
Expenses 



Undistributed 
Debt 



$702,799 



$1,709,737 
$3,778,374 

($1,166,712) 

$4,321,399 

$30,000 



$219,329 

$35,975 



$524,821 
$169,350 



Principal 
Interest 



$909,973 
$382,043 

$6,425,000 



$5,585,351 
$2,008,800 



Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the meeting be adjourn until 7:30 PM, Thursday 
April 27, 2000, at the Senior Center on Groton Rd. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Meeting adjourned at 1 1 :20 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



Adjourned Town Meeting April 27, 2000 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 PM at the Senior Center. The 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 140 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. 



80 



The Moderator discussed a point of order raised by George Merrill concerning the Town 
Managers entitlement to debate or comment on an issue. He felt that the Town Manager has no 
status. He is not a Town Meeting Representative. He felt that the same issue applied to the 
School Superintendent as well. The Moderator said that he and the Town Counsel both agree 
that according to the Charter under IV Town Manager Section 4-3 Administrative Powers and 
Duties (e) and VI Financial Provisions Section 6-1 Annual Budget Policy, the Town Manager is 
well within his jurisdiction to debate or make comments on articles. 



Under Article 10. Selectman Philip M. Eliopoulos moved that the Town appropriate the 
sum of $875,000 for the following capital projects: 



Function 


Department /Location 


Project 


Expenditure 


Public 
Safety 


Police 
Fire 


Cruiser Replacement 
Refurbish Rescue Truck 1 


$135,000 
$60,000 




Public Safety Subtotal 


$195,000 


Public 
Works 


DPW 


Drainage Improvements 

Old Townhall Air Conditioning 

Six- Wheel Dump Truck 


$100,000 
$60,000 
$80,000 




Public Works Subtotal 


$240,000 


Public 
Education 


McCarthy Middle 
Administrative Tech. 


Roof Replacement (Phase lof4) 
Integrated Financial System 


$390,000 
$50,000 




School Department Subtotal 


$440,000 




CAPITA 


L PROJECTS TOTAL 




$875,000 



And to transfer the sum of $105,000 from Free Cash; transfer $5,742 from unexpended bond 
proceeds under Article 30 of the Annual Town Meeting of April 25, 1994; transfer $186 from 
unexpended bond proceeds under Article 6 of the Annual Town Meeting of April 28, 1997; 
transfer $24,072 from unexpended bond proceeds under Article 7 of the Annual Town Meeting 
of April 27, 1998; and to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to borrow $740,000 under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Sections 7 and 8 or any 
other enabling authority to fund these obligations. 



81 



The Town Manager explained the need for the various articles listed. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked if there was any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 11. Chairman of the School Committee Mary- Jo S Griffin moved that the 
Town borrow $660,000 for the purpose of funding the purchase of two, four-unit temporary 
classrooms at the Parker and McCarthy Middle Schools and the purchase of the existing two- 
classroom unit at the South Row Elementary School. 



Dr Richard Moser, School Superintendent explained that these temporary classrooms are 
necessary at these locations because enrollment has increased. There is no space available in 
these buildings to provide additional teachers and classrooms. He cited information that was on 
the School Committee's handout. The purchase of temporary classrooms at Parker and 
McCarthy Middle Schools represents a short-term solution to the overgrowing problem. The 
Building Needs Committee will recommend a long-term solution for the middle school facilities 
in the immediate future. He went over the figures presented regarding leasing the classrooms Vs 
purchasing. It was in the Town's best financial interest to purchase, rather than lease. The budget 
just passed already reflects the required staff, supplies, materials and cost of utilities. A number 
of Representatives asked questions concerning the DAR report, the number of classrooms this 
would make available, bonding, maintenance cost and the location of the classrooms. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for 
a vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 12. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved_that the Town raise and 
appropriate $25,000 for the purpose of funding the sand purchase approved by the Town under 
Article 4 of the 1998 Special Town Meeting held on April 27, 1998. 



The Town Manager explained that this is a yearly article. The Town agreed to make 
payments each year rather then pay the total amount up front. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked if there was any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 13. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town accept the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5K which authorizes the Town to establish a 
senior citizen's property tax work-off abatement program, to be effective beginning in fiscal year 
2001 and to authorize the Council on Aging to promulgate rules and regulations to implement 
said program subject to the approval of the Town Manager, provided that the total amount of 
abatements granted under this program shall not exceed $20,000 in any given year. 



82 



The Town Manager explained that this to is a yearly article. This program was started 
about nine years ago. Other Towns have followed Chelmsford's example. Legislation has now 
made this a law, which means that once accepted it would not come before the Town Meeting 
Body again for yearly approval. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for any further 
discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 



Under Article 14. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town raise and 
appropriate $4,346. with which to meet bills from previous years. 



The Town Manager explained that the Town's books closed June 30, 1999. This amount 
reflects utility bills that were all lumped together. They had to be researched and divided up to 
the various departments for payment, which wasn't completed by the end of the fiscal year. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for 
a vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 15. Selectman Philip M. Eliopoulos moved that the Town accept the 
following mentioned streets, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown by their reports 
duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk: 



Bentas Place 
Ann's Way 
Stage Road 



Providing all the construction of the same meets with the requirements of the Board of 
Selectmen, and subject to the withholding of any remaining bonds until such requirements have 
been met; and I move that the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and all 
temporary and/or permanent easements, and any property in fee simple, with trees thereon, by 
purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for the purpose of securing traffic safety and road 
improvements, and I move that the Town raise and appropriate $3 to defray all necessary costs, 
fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as a result of any such taking; and I move that the Town authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary and proper contracts and agreements 
thereto. 



83 



The Town Manager said that the above roads have been built accordingly to the Town's 
subdivision rules and regulations and now need to be accepted. John Wilder questioned Stage 
Rd, he thought it was already accepted. The Manager explained that this was a portion of Old 
Stage Rd near the end that had been renamed Stage Rd. The Finance Committee recommended 
the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was 
any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 16. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved move that the Town authorizes 
a revolving fund under Massachusetts General Laws C. 44, S. 53E Vz for the Council on Aging 
for Fiscal Year 2001. The receipts to be credited to the fund shall be from the collection of fees 
from the implementation of a Senior Trip program. The Council on Aging shall be authorized to 
spend money from the fund for the purpose of providing transportation necessary for 
implementing a Senior Trip program. Expenditures from the Senior Trip program revolving 
fund shall be limited to $300,000 during Fiscal Year 2001. 



The Town Manager explained that this is the third year of establishing this revolving 
fund. In the past it had been managed by the Friends of the Senior Center, but due to liability 
issues the Town had to take it over. It requires approval each year. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked if there was any need for any further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 17. Selectman Philip M. Eliopoulos moved that the Town accept as public 
ways the layout of a portion of Willis Road and Twelfth Avenue as shown on a plan on file in the 
office of the Town Clerk; and to borrow $106,000 for the purpose of making improvements to 
said ways; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple, with trees thereon, by purchase, eminent 
domain, or otherwise, for the purpose of securing traffic safety and road improvements, and to 
use that portion of appropriated funds as required to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses 
in connection with the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages which may be 
awarded as a result of any such taking; and I move that the Town authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary and proper contracts and agreements thereto, 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to assess betterments pursuant to General Laws Chapter 
80 on those individuals who receive a benefit from said road improvements. 



The Town Manager explained that this is currently a dirt road with a number of camps, 
vacant lots and homes that goes around Freeman Lake. There are thirty parcels of land and 
twenty-one owners. The property owners to have the road paved approached the Town. The 
Town requires that the road be done according to the standards of the subdivision rules and 
regulations. Normally a builder builds the road and passes the costs onto the new property 
owners, however in this case a partnership was formed with the property owners and betterment 
will be charged. It is estimated that the construction cost would be $106,000., $14,000. will be 
used from the Sewer project. The Town's actual cost of 8% would be $18,000. which would 
leave a balance of $73,600. that will be paid in betterments by the property owners. The 

84 



Manager stressed that this project would not only increase the land value of the property owners 
it would also be a benefit for the Town due to lower road maintenance costs. He asked for 
support from the Body. Bill Curry questioned what the correct name was. The article said 
Willis Road and the map shown says Willis Drive. Willis Drive is correct. John Wilder was 
concern that this would set precedence. The process may become a requirement, should future 
programs be set up. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. David McLachlan spoke in favor of the article. This is the kind of 
project that appeals to a neighborhood. The Moderator asked if there was any need for any 
further discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 18. Selectman Michael McCall moved that the Town amend the 
Chelmsford Code, Chapter 195, Zoning, Section 195-3, formerly Section 2111, Official Zoning 
Map, to change from RB Single Residence to CD General Commercial, the contiguous parcels 
known as 24 and 28 North Road, as shown on the Zoning Map, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to accept a restrictive covenant with respect to the property. 



The Moderator said that the petitioner had an attorney present and asked permission to 
allow Attorney Howard Hall to address the Body. Motion carried. Attorney Hall came forward 
and gave a brief presentation to the Body. His client Dr Rodger Currie is presently a 
businessman and former resident of the Town. He has an office building on North Rd a few 
doors down from the above article. He had in the past purchased and renovated the Emerson 
property which is currently the site for Family Bank. The property mentioned in the article is 
located on the "gateway" into Chelmsford Center. Currently the two buildings built in 1870 and 
1930 are one single family and one-two family homes. These would be torn down and a 
replaced with a residential style building. A classic Georgian colonial in design modeled after 
the historic Longfellow House in Cambridge, Ma is proposed. The 8,000 square foot building 
will be used as an office building. If this article passes tonight Dr Currie will sign a covenant 
with the Board of Selectmen stating that that will be the only use. There will be no retail, no fast 
food no use car business. Adrienne Jerome questioned the parking situation. Attorney Hall said 
that the parking would be located in the rear of the building. An agreement has been made with 
the abutters that greenery will be planted in order to avoid the lot being seen from their property. 
. Steve Maloney questioned what would happen if the re-zoning took place but the various 
boards denied the building of the building. He felt that the proposal would be accepted will work 
with the Boards in order to accomplish the project. Mark Connor questioned if the Historic 
Commission had an opinion. Jeffrey Stallard said the Board had none at this point and explained 
the 100-year demolition requirement. Kathy Howe questioned that this would be spot zoning if 
approved. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. Christopher Garrahan Chairman of the Planning Board said that the 
Planning Board's recommendation was in favor of the project. A discussion took place. Sandy 
Donovan spoke against the article. She had concerns about the lack of housing availability and 
the location of another office building would cause traffic problems. George Merrill spoke 
against the article, as well as David McLachlan. Peggy Dunn spoke against the article and asked 
that the Body vote against the motion. Richard Johnson spoke in favor of the article. Peter 
Lawlor spoke in favor. Bill Spence spoke in favor. Brian Latina spoke against the article. 
Norman Aubert had concerns with the traffic issue. Leonard Richards spoke in favor. Bernard 
Lynch spoke in favor. He explained that he has discussed this project with Dr Currie and felt it 
would be beneficial to the Town. John Coppinger moved the question to stop debate. The 

85 



Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator attempted 
a vote by way of a show of hands and he didn't want to declare the 2/3's rule, he asked the tellers 
to come forward and conduct a hand count: Lucy Simonian, Patricia Plank, Gertrude Mack, John 
Maleski. The result Yes 1 10 N 26 2/3's is 91 the motion carried. 



Under Article 19 Chairman of the Planning Board Christopher Garrahan moved that the 
Town amend the Town Charter by adding the following paragraph to subsection 3-5 (a): 



There may be one associate member of the planning board when the board is designated a special 
permit granting authority under the town's zoning by-law. The associate member of the 
planning board shall be elected at the annual town election. If the position becomes vacant or is 
unfilled the position shall be jointly appointed by members of the Board of Selectmen and the 
Planning Board. The associate member of the Planning Board shall be elected for a term of two 
years. 



Christopher Garrahan Chairman of the Planning Board explained the article and said that 
the Planning Board supported it. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for any further 
discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 



Under Article 20 the Moderator explained that he had no sign motion for this article and 
he declared the motion withdrawn. The article read as follows: To see if the Town will vote to 
change the designation and grant a use variance under the Town of Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, 
Section 195-103, formerly Section 2111, as it pertains to a 41,171 square foot, more or less, 
portion of Parcel 8 on Assessor's Map 103, 10 Independence Drive, Chelmsford, Massachusetts, 
east of Meetinghouse Road and south of Interstate Route 495, said Parcel 8 being a portion of the 
land described in a deed recorded with the Middlesex County North District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 6273, Page 72 dated December 22, 1992, by changing the designation of said portion of 
Parcel 8 from CD Zoning District to CB Zoning District and to allow a use variance to operate a 
motor vehicle rental use within said parcel under a CB Zoning District, and the uses in 
relationship thereto. 



Seeing that there was no further business to address, the Moderator moved to adjourn the 
meeting. Motion carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 9:10 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



86 



Annual Falltown Meeting October 16, 2000 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 PM at the Senior Center. The 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 148 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. The Moderator pointed out the fire exits located in the room., 
and then went over the rules and procedures of the meeting. He then asked for a moment of 
silence for Eleanor Parkhurst who had been known as the unofficial Town historian. 



Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the reading of the Constable's return of the 
warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the 
reading of the entire warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the Town vote to hear 
reports of the Town Officers and Committees. 



State Senator Susan Fargo and State Representative Carol Cleven each came forward and 
reported on the various bills and progress of events that had passed since the April meeting. 
Superintendent of Schools Dr Richard Moser gave a report on the School Facilities. Selectman 
Thomas Moran and Finance Committee member Mary Frantz gave a progress report of the 
Building Needs Committee. The Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that at the Spring 
Town Meeting a final recommendation would be made to the Body and the DRA. Which would 
include a long-range maintenance and capital plan, which was a priority, also the funding plan to 
move the project forward. 



Dennis Ready questioned why the Attorney General's office rejected the proposed 
charter change concerning the attendance requirements for Town Meeting Representatives that 
had been voted on at the Spring Town Meeting. The Town Manager explained that the charter 
change had been submitted to the Attorney General as required. The Town Meeting body could 
not vote to make this type of change. The Attorney General said that in order for this change to 
go into effect a Charter Study would have to be conducted and then voted on by ballot by the 
registered voters of the Town. 



UNDER ARTICLE 2. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
transfer $1,000,000 from Free Cash to the Stabilization Fund. 



The Town Manager explained that this would be added to the current fund which 
contains roughly $7 million dollars which is 10 % of the operating budget. Due to the amount of 
cash in reserve, the Town receives favorable bond ratings when it comes to capital projects. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

87 



UNDER ARTICLE 3. Dennis Ready moved to act upon this article after article 22. The 
Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 4. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Fiscal Year 2001 operating budget under Article 2 of the Annual Town Meeting held 
on April 24, 2000 as follows: 



Increase Line Item #3 Chelmsford School Department by $85,000 

Decrease Line Item #4 Nashoba Technical High School by $79,738 

Increase Line Item #5 Public Safety Personnel by $60,554 

Increase Line Item #6 Public Safety Expenses by $10,000 

Increase Line Item #14 Library Personnel by $19,500 

Increase Line Item #16 Undistributed Expenses by $350,000 

And that the Town raise and appropriate the necessary funds to defray such changes. 



The Manager explained the article. Due to increase in usage of the new library facilities, 
more staffing hours are needed. The Police settled for a three year contract with a 3% increase 
in pay the first year and 3% the second year and 4% increase the third year, additional 1 % for 
defibrillation and EMT training. There will be a pay increase in shift differential, and an increase 
in uniform allowance. There will be savings to the Town due to the eventual change in the pay 
week from weekly to bi-weekly and the way vacation time is computed. The increase in 
undistributed expenses is due to the i ncr e ase in h e a lth and medicare tax.costs. Mark Connors, 
George Ripsom, James Hickey and Roger Sumner asked questions regarding the figures. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none,, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 5. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
transfer $93,556 from Free Cash to the School Department said funding coming from Medicaid 
reimbursements. 



The Manager explained that this is a yearly article. The School Department researches 
and recovers the funds in agreement with the Town that the reimbursements are turned over to 
them. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended 
the article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

88 



UNDER ARTICLE 6. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
transfer from Free Cash $3,1 14 with which to pay bills of previous fiscal years. 



The Manager explained that there were three outstanding bills from last fiscal year. 
Billerica Sports & Marine $244.30 for the Fire Department. Lowell Sun $1,727.30 for various 
departmental ads and $1,141.00 for Tree work. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was 
any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 7. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
transfer $65,535 from Special Revenue to the School Department, said funding coming from E- 
Rate reimbursements. 



The Manager explained that this is a supplement to the School Department budget. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 8. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
transfer from Free Cash $10,000 to fund the Community Action Program established under 
Article 12 of the April 29, 1996 Annual Town Meeting. The purpose of this program shall be to 
provide matching funds to community improvement projects undertaken by individuals and/or 
organizations within the Town of Chelmsford. 



The Town Manager explained that this is money used to startup projects for 
neighborhood and civic groups to make improvements to areas in the Town. Glenn Thoren 
asked if the program was so successful perhaps more money should be applied. The Manager 
explained that even though it has been successful it is a workable amount. . The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 9. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
transfer $32,884 from Free Cash to the Special Revenue account for the Byam School Insurance 
claim. 



89 



The Manager explained that there had been a flood at the Byam School, repairs were 
needed and done immediately. According to State law, this required Town Meeting action first 
before the work was done. That is the reason for the article now. . The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 10. Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the Town approve the 
filing of a petition in the General Court for the purpose of creating an Open Space Fund for 
Chelmsford. The legislation shall read as follows: 



SECTION 1. There is hereby established in the town of Chelmsford an open space land 
acquisition fund for the purpose of acquiring land and interests in land for the protection of open 
space, public drinking water supplies, conservation land, the creation of walking and bicycling 
trails, and the creation of recreational areas. 



SECTION 2. The town shall establish said fund as a separate account to be maintained by the 
treasurer. The following monies shall be deposited into said account: (i) fifty percent of the 
proceeds generated by the sale of any land acquired by the town of Chelmsford through tax title 
foreclosure, (ii) all of the proceeds from the sale of conservation land or from any leases of 
conservation land, (iii) any gifts made to the town for the express purpose of open space 
acquisition, (iv) any appropriations made by Town Meeting to this fund. The treasurer may 
invest the funds in such separate account in the manner authorized by sections fifty-five and 
fifty-five(a) of chapter forty-four. Any interest earned thereon shall be credited to and become 
part of such separate account. 



SECTION 3. The town may purchase land or interests therein for the purposes set forth in 
Section 1, subject to appropriation. Town meeting may not appropriate any money from said 
fund unless the Board of Selectmen has first conducted a public hearing on said acquisition and 
has made a recommendation to town meeting. 



SECTION 4. This act shall take effect upon passage; 



The General Court may only make clerical or editorial changes to the bill, unless the Board of 
Selectmen approves amendments to the bill prior to enactment by the General Court. The Board 
of Selectmen is hereby authorized to approve amendments, which shall be within the general 
public objective of the petition. 



90 



The Town Manager explained that this would allow the Town to create an open space 
fund. This would allow the Town to implement the recommendation of the master plan to obtain 
open space, by setting money aside for this purpose. The present State statues do not warrant this 
type of funding. Dennis Ready, John Wilder and Leonard Richards asked questions. . The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 11. The Town Manager explained that this article was to be 
withdrawn at this time. It will be taken up in the Spring. The Finance Committee had no 
recommendation. The Board of Selectmen recommended to withdraw the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The article reads as follows: Town Manager Bernard 
F. Lynch moved that the Town vote amend the Code of the Town of Chelmsford by adding a 
new Chapter 103, to be entitled "Nuisances", which chapter provides for the investigation and 
remediation of nuisances. 



UNDER ARTICLE 12. The Town Manager explained that there was no signed motion 
available on this article, therefore no action could be taken on the article. The article read as 
follows: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Chelmsford Code, Chapter 195, Zoning, 
Section 195-3 Official Zoning Map, to change from lA-Industrial to CD General Commercial 
the contiguous parcel known as 235 Billerica Road, as shown on the Zoning Map. 



UNDER ARTICLE 13. Dwight Hayward moved that the reading of the article be 
waived. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, Motion carried 
unanimously. The Manager explained that this is the result of side streets that intersect into major 
roadways. There are certain areas that are obstructed with greenery or fences, which makes the 
vision obstructed. This would allow the Town to implement fines if the owner of the property in 
question doesn't make improvements to the area. A number of Representatives asked questions 
concerning the merits of the article. Police Chief Raymond McCusker explained that his police 
officers are constantly being asked to address potential safety hazards at intersections. He felt 
that with this by-law the liability would be on the homeowner not the Town if the property 
wasn't maintained after being cited.The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. George Merrill moved to amend the article by 
changing the joining points of 30 feet in the first paragraph to read 15 feet. He explained that 
certain parts of Chelmsford have smaller neighborhood streets, then other areas of Town. After 
consulting with the Town Engineer, the Town Manager said that if the joining points read 20 feet 
then it would be a workable amendment. George Merrill agreed to change his motion to read 20 
feet. Kathy Howe questioned why this by-law wasn't under the zoning rules. Joel Baird Town 
Counsel said it could come under the zoning by-law but felt that it would be more manageable as 
a general by-law. Jeffrey Stallard questioned the location of a hedge at the North Congregational 
Church. It was explained that each individual case would be viewed and decided upon. The 
Moderator asked for a vote on the motion to amend the article to read 20 feet. Motion carried. 
Mark Connors questioned who would enforce the by-law. The Manager explained that it would 
be the Police and Building Inspector. David McLachlan felt that the by-law should be defeated 
and redrafted and brought back in the Spring addressing all the areas of the Town. George 
Zaharoolis expressed concerns about liability. Barry Balan moved the question to stop debate. 
91 



The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, which left the Chair in doubt. He asked 
the tellers: Dorothy Frawley, Joseph Marcotte, Lucy Simonian, and John Maleski to come 
forward and conduct a hand count. The Moderator attempted another show of hands. A majority 
vote was needed, motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to amend the Code of the 
Town of Chelmsford by adding a new Article V, to be entitled "Vision Obstructions," to Chapter 
142, Streets and Sidewalks, which article provides for certain restrictions on objects at street 
intersections and penalties for violation as follows: 



ARTICLE V 
Vision Obstructions 



§ 142-38. Use restrictions § 142-39. Violations and penalties. 



§ 142-38. Use restrictions. 



In order to provide an unobstructed sight distance for motorists, nothing shall be erected, placed, 
planted or allowed to grow in such a manner as to block vision of operators of motor vehicles 
between a height of 2 Vi and 10 feet above grades of the intersecting streets in the area bounded 
by the street lines of said real estate and a line joining points 20 feet along said street lines from 
the point of intersection of said street lines. Buildings existing as of the effective date of this by- 
law are exempt from this by-law. 



§ 142-39. Violations and penalties. 



Any person who violates this provision and after being notified by the Board of Selectmen in 
writing of such violation, permits such violation to continue for 30 days after receipt of said 
notice, may be punished by a fine of $50. For the purposes of this section, each successive day 
during which any violations committed or continued shall be deemed a separate offense. 
Violations of this provision may be enforced through noncriminal disposition, in accordance 
with MGL c. 40, §21D, and Article H, §1-2 of the Chelmsford General By-Laws. The Board of 
Selectmen or its designee, Chelmsford police officers, and the Director of the Department of 
Public Works may enforce this section. 



92 



The Moderator made a point of order. He wanted the Body to be aware that from time to 
time he was the Moderator for the Chelmsford Water District. He felt it was necessary to 
disclose this information because the next article was connected to the Chelmsford Water 
District. 



UNDER ARTICLE 14. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
transfer the care, custody, management and control of the following described parcel of land to 
the Board of Selectmen to be held for the purpose of conveyance and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to grant to the Chelmsford Water District an interest in fee simple, or any lesser 
interest including but not limited to an easement, in all or any portion of the land located off 
Smith Street, currently owned by the Town of Chelmsford and more particularly described as 
Map 40, Block 131, Lot 46 of the Board of Assessors Maps, and in an instrument recorded at the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2457, Page 347, for the purpose of 
establishing and protecting a new well and the well field to be established to supplement the 
current public water supply and facilities in existence at said location, and to authorize the Town 
Manager to negotiate and undertake such actions as required to grant such interest on terms and 
conditions as the Board shall deem necessary and appropriate and in the public interest, for such 
use by the Chelmsford Water District. 



The Manager explained that this article was brought forward by working with the 
Chelmsford Water District in order that the District could make improvements to the well 
already established in the area. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, 
hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 15. Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the Town vote to 
transfer the care, custody, management and control of the following described parcel of land to 
the Board of Selectmen to be held for the purpose of conveyance and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 30B, for 
consideration to be determined, all right, title, and interest, if any, held by the Town in a certain 
portion of a parcel of land on Fifth Avenue shown as Map 18, Block 76, Lot 5, containing 3,300 
square feet more or less, and more fully described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds in Book 6218, Page 61. 



The Manager explained that this land had been originally taken for non payment of 
taxes. An abutter had contacted the Manager expressing an interest in purchasing the land. The 
land will be offered through the competitive bid process, all abutters will be notified. Susan 
Carter of the Planning Board asked if this land would be used to be combined with other land in 
order to obtain a legal building lot. The Manager explained that there would be a stipulation on 
the deed stating that it can not be built on. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



93 



UNDER ARTICLE 16. John Emerson Chairman of the Sewer Commission explained 
that this is a continuing article that the Sewer Commission brings before Town Meeting when a 
new contract is under consideration. These land takings will enable the Sewer Commission to 
continue the Sewer project in the most cost effective and direct route. John O'Connell began to 
read a prepared statement to the Body the Moderator explained that this was the question and 
answer period. John O'Connell said that he felt before he could receive an answer to his 
question he had to make some explanatory facts in order to get a correct answer to his question. 
He said he would keep it brief, make his point and not express his opinion, nor would he urge for 
a vote for or against the article. The Moderator thanked him and Mr O'Connell continued to 
read his statement. He stated that he was and worked as an engineer for the past 35 years. He 
had submitted an article to the local paper regarding the effect sprinkler and sewer systems had 
on the water supply. The article was based on information supplied to him by the experts. He 
felt that when he had asked his question previously to a few members of the Sewer Commission, 
he had been given the incorrect answer. The purpose of giving these facts is to help the 
Commission give the correct answer so that the Town Meeting Members can understand the 
answer to the question. The Moderator explained that giving facts is part of debate portion, he 
requested that Mr O'Connell ask his question. He further explained that Mr O'Connell could ask 
a question during the debate portion of the article. Mr O'Connell said that he had many reasons, 
that once the floor was open, a Town Meeting Representative would make a motion to limit 
debate, which would stop his explanatory remarks from being heard. He then requested that the 
Moderator give to him in writing the decision not to allow him from presenting the facts along 
with the Moderator's reasons on making the decision. The Moderator said that he would allow 
Mr O'Connell to remain at the microphone and he could be the first one to debate under the 
debate portion. There are to be questions first, then various recommendations, then there will be 
debate. Mr O'Connell responded by saying that since the Moderator would not allow him to 
present the facts, he would not ask his question. The Moderator asked if there was any other 
questions, hearing none he asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. John 
O'Connell came forward and gave his statement. His position has to do with changing 
objections. When the project was first started the first objective was to sewer the worst area's 
defined by court order. Then a new objective was approved to sewer the entire Town. The area 
in the article has the lowest percentage in failure rate in systems and the best and cleanest wells. 
Apparently when this objective was approved no consideration was given on how the sewer 
system would effect the wells. He felt that it was time to seize trying to sewer the entire Town 
and declares that the sewer project is successfully completed and works towards a new objective 
to conserve and preserve the Town's water supply. He then listed facts to his statement. They 
concerned a Boston Globe article about rainwater and water conservation, the aquifer, costs for 
hooking up to the remaining sewer systems, and the cost of sending the sewage to the Lowell 
treatment plan. He said that the State is looking into the possibility of sewer systems depleting 
water supplies, which may result in returning to septic systems instead of sewer systems. He felt 
it would be best not to pass the article at this time until all alternatives if any are reviewed and 
approved. John Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer Commission responded. He said by the Town 
having the sewage system it did keep the property values high, however more importantly it 
protected the drinking water supply. The lakes and streams had been cleaned up by this sewer 
project. 76% of the Town has been sewer. This has been done at five separate occasions, 
through open town meeting, representative town meeting, and ballot questions. The objective 
was to get the Town out from under the constraints of the title five law. If this article doesn't 
pass it will cost more money because the Sewer Commission will have to go back and find 

94 



alternatives routes in the public way in order to continue the project. The routes chosen are the 
most cost efficient, the same consultants have done them, has completed forty-one contracts 
already? He cited other towns who stopped their projects with 90% funding. Chelmsford is 
ahead of these Towns. Property values remain equal. Right now the average cost is between 
$10,000 to $13,000 dollars to sewer a home. That won't change, some area cost more than 
others, in Mr O'Connell's area, which had a great amount of ledge the cost, was $22,000 per 
home. Due to other areas being less it brought down the cost. Mr Emerson read a letter from 
the state DEP saying that no significant change would result in the water table from this project. 
Mr Emerson asked for support of the article. Dennis Ready spoke in favor of the article. 
Representative Carol Cleven said that the State is looking at some areas of the State where the 
water table is very low, like the Ipswich River area. Septic systems will be allowed, and the title 
five guidelines which do not give very much back if an expensive replacement must be made. 
She urged for support of the article. John O'Connell stated that his septic system was reliable, he 
felt that it was an unneeded expense. When asked how many systems on his street had failed he 
was told about four to five. Kathy Howe noted that people should know that just because the 
system is working i.e. toilet flushing, doesn't mean it won't fail. It needs to be inspected to 
verify that it is in fact a working system, which means that pollutants aren't going into the 
ground. Leonard Richards made a motion to move the question. The Moderator asked if there 
was any need for debate? Hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried. The Moderator then asked for a vote on the article by way show of hands. A 2/3 's vote 
is required and he declared the motion carried by recognizing the 2/3 's by-law. The article reads 
as follows: 

John P. Emerson, Jr, Chairman of the Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer Commissioners to acquire any and all 
temporary and/or permanent easements, and any property in fee simple with the buildings and 
trees thereon by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for the property located in the Town of 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and shown on a set of plans entitled "Plan of 
Sewer Easements in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Dennison Road/Locke Road Area - Phase 4C 
Sewers", a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer and is incorporated herein 
by reference, for the purpose of constructing and maintaining sewers, pumping stations, and all 
other appurtenances thereto. 



UNDER ARTICLE 17. Dwight Hayward moved to waive the reading of the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The Town Manager 
explained that the article was to be amended under section 10-2 Use restrictions section B. to 
change the wording special permit from the Board of Appeals to read special license from the 
Board of Selectmen. He explained that currently these licenses are issued by the Board of 
Selectmen. He asked that Police Chief Raymond McCusker come forward to further explain the 
article. Chief McCusker explained that this would not restrict the machines from being in Town, 
it would however, required them to be on record and inspected by the Town. It has been a 
known fact with area Police Departments to have machines look like one thing and in reality be 
the type of machines used for gambling. By requiring all machines to be registered and inspected 
Police would be able to stop the public's usage of any illegal machines. Selectman Michael 
McCall moved to further amend the article Section 10-1 section B subsection (1) by adding the 
word may after the word which, Automatic amusement devices which may... The Moderator 
asked if there was any need to debate? Hearing none,, he asked for a show of hands on the 
motion to change the wording to be special license from the Board of Selectmen. Motion carried. 

95 



He then asked for a show of hands on the motion to add the word may. Motion carried. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands on the motion as amended, motion carried, unanimously. The articles reads 
as follows: 



Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to amend the Code of the 
Town of Chelmsford by adding a new Chapter 10, to be entitled "Amusement Devices, 
Automatic," which chapter provides for certain restrictions on automatic amusement licenses 
issued by the Town and penalties for violation. 



CHAPTER 10 

AMUSEMENT DEVICES, AUTOMATIC 



§ 10-1. License required; features promoting misuse. § 10-3. Violations and penalties. 
§10-2. Use Restrictions. §10-4. Severability 

§ 10-1. License required; features promoting misuse. 



In accordance with MGL c. 140, § 177 A, as amended from time to time, any individual or 
business desiring to keep and operate an automatic amusement device for hire, gain or reward 
shall secure an annual license from the Board of Selectmen. 



The Board of Selectmen shall not grant a license for any automatic amusement device that 
presents a risk of misuse as a gaming device. 



Automatic amusement devices which may present a risk of misuse as gaming devices are those 
devices which have one or more of the following features: 



The device involves matching random numbers, patterns or cards. 
The device accumulates more than 26 plays. 



The device is equipped with a "knock off switch, button or similar device that resets the total 
pionts won as shown on the video screen and adds these points to a second meter and/or 
recording device. 
96 



The device has a mechanism for adjusting the odds. 

The device has a remote control feature that can reset the device from another location. 

The device is capable of returning money to the player, other than the change for the excess 
amount put in. 

The device permits a player to pay for more than one game at a time. 



Each game on the device shall cost exactly the same amount for each player, and no player may 
change any aspect of the game by paying a different amount than any other player before or 
during the game. 



There shall be no metering device that accounts for both money/points in and money/points out. 



§ 10-2. Use restrictions. 



The maximum number of automatic amusement devices allowed on any single business premises 
shall be four, except in the case of duly licensed arcades and amusement parks. 



Any individual or business desiring more than four automatic amusement devices on a single 
business premises shall require a special license from the Board of Selectmen. 



§ 10-3. Enforcement; violations and penalties. 

The enforcing authority under this chapter shall be the Chelmsford Police Department. 



All licenses for automatic amusement devices granted by the Board of Selectmen shall be subject 
to inspection by the Chelmsford Police Department to ensure conformance with submitted 
application information and local code requirements. 



Any unlicensed automatic amusement device shall be subject to immediate seizure by the 
Chelmsford Police Department. 



97 



Violation of this chapter shall be liable to a penalty of $250, with each unlicensed amusement 
device constituting a separate offense. 



§ 10-4. Severability. 



The provisions of this chapter are declared to be severable, and if any section, subsection, 
sentence, clause or part thereof is, for any reason, held to be invalid or unconstitutional by a 
court of competent jurisdiction, such decision shall not affect the validity of any remaining 
sections, subsections, sentences, clauses or part of the chapter. 



UNDER ARTICLE 18. Selectman Philip Eliopoulos moved that the Town vote to 
acquire by purchase, gift, eminent domain, or otherwise, the property located in the Town of 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and shown on a set of plans entitled 
"Chelmsford Center Project 05809, prepared by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.," a copy of which 
is on file in the Office of the Town Engineer and is incorporated herein by reference, for the 
purpose of Central Square Improvements; and to transfer from Free Cash $10,000 for said 
acquisition. 



The Town Manager showed a overhead view of the project. He explained that the areas 
shaded are the areas being addressed in the article. Three privately owned properties. There are 
two sidewalk areas in Central Square and a piece of land in front of the current Mobil gas station. 
The areas look like Town owned land by way of appearance, however they are in fact owned by 
the direct abutters. In order for the work to be done these areas must be under the Town's 
jurisdiction, the Town needs to take control of these areas. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. George Merrill of 
the Historical Commission sited that these proposed project will change the characteristic of the 
center. It will lose that small town effect. Linda Prescott, Chairman of the Historical 
Commission said that the State had sent the Commission different information regarding the land 
taking in other areas of the project, and wanted their recommendation. Clinton Barlow, Pastor 
of the Central Baptist Church questioned if the sidewalk width in front of the residence and 
church would be reduced in size?? The Manager said it would not. More discussion took place. 
The Moderator reminded the Body that the discussion and questions are to limited to the three 
areas on the motion. Any other areas of the project are not relevant. The Moderator asked if 
there was any need for futher discussion, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands. A 2/3's vote is required, the Moderator declared the motion carried by recognizing the 
2/3 's vote by-law. 



98 



UNDER ARTICLE 19. Dwight Hayward moved to waive the reading of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. Andrew Sheehan of the 
Master Plan Committee explained the article. The purpose of the article was to update the by- 
law to reflect the lighting improvements now available through new technology. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
Christopher Garraghan, Chairman of the Planning Board read the Board's recommendation. The 
Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing on September 27, 2000 on the 
above mentioned article after advertising a legal notice in the Lowell Sun on September 12, 2000 
and September 19, 2000. A copy of the advertisement was sent to all abutting municipalities and 
the appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 40 A, Section 5. 
The public hearing for this article was continued to the meeting on October 11, 2000. It is the 
Board's opinion the proposed article would bring the outdoor lighting requirements in line with 
current lighting technology. Therefore, in keeping with the general intention of the zoning by- 
law in the development of the community, the Planning Board voted unanimously (7-0) to 
recommend this article. Kelly Beatty asked for support of the article. The Moderator asked if 
there was any need to hear further debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands. Motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as follows: 



Robert Morse Chairman of the Master Plan Committee moved that the Town vote to amend 
Chelmsford Code, Chapter 195, Zoning, Section 195-34 Outdoor Lighting, by deleting the 
existing section which reads: 



§ 195-34. Outdoor lighting. 



Overspill. Illuminated signs, parking lot lighting, building floodlighting or other exterior lighting 
shall be so designed and arranged that its collective result does not create so much light overspill 
onto adjacent premises that it casts observable shadows and so that it does not create glare from 
unshielded light sources. 



Unless all the following are met, it will be presumed that the above performance requirements 
are not satisfied. The Board of Appeals may grant a special permit for lighting which does not 
comply with these specifications if it determines that the performance standards of Subsection A 
will still be met and if the applicant documents that brightness of any sign or building element 
will not exceed 20 foot lamberts in residential districts or 50 foot lamberts in other districts. 



Internally illuminated signs on the premises collectively total not more than 200 watts unless not 
exceeding 15,000 lumens. 

Externally illuminated signs employ only shielded lights fixed within three feet of the surface 
they illuminate. 

Building floodlighting totals not more than 2,000 watts unless not exceeding 50,000 lumens. 

Exterior lighting fixtures other than signs are mounted not more than 20 feet high. 



99 



Hours. No sign or building in any residential district or within 300 feet of any residential district 
if within sight from it shall be illuminated between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. unless 
indicating an establishment open to the public during those hours. 



Movement. No flashing, moving or revolving lights shall be maintained. 



AND INSERTING THE FOLLOWING: 



§ 195-34. Outdoor illumination. 



Purpose. This section recognizes the benefits of outdoor lighting and provides clear guidelines 
for its installation, so as to help maintain and complement the character of the Town. The intent 
of this section is to encourage lighting that provides safety, utility and security; prevent glare on 
public roadways; protect the privacy of residents; promote energy efficient outdoor lighting; and 
to reduce atmospheric light pollution. 



Applicability. The requirements of this section shall apply to any new construction. With the 
exception of single family dwellings and two family dwellings, if modifications or additions 
exceed 25% of the gross floor area, dwelling units, or parking spaces, all lighting on the property 
shall be made to comply with the provisions of this section. For the purposes of this section, if 
the aggregate of any additions or modifications within the five previous calendar years exceeds 
25%, the provisions of this section shall apply. The requirements of this section may be reduced 
by special permit issued by the Planning Board upon a finding that such reduction will not 
detract from the objectives of this section. 



Standards. 



Any luminaire with a lamp or lamps rated at a total of more than 2,000 lumens, and all flood or 
spot luminaires with a lamp or lamps rated at a total of more than 1,000 lumens, shall be of a full 
cutoff design, with the lamp or lamps surrounded and shielded such that 



no direct light is emitted above a horizontal plane through the lowest part of the luminaire 
emitting direct light. If any spot or flood luminaire rated 1,000 lumens or less is directed or 
focused such as to cause direct light from the luminaire to be cast toward residential buildings on 
adjacent or nearby land, or to create glare perceptible to persons operating motor vehicles on 
public ways, the luminaire shall be redirected or its light output controlled as necessary to 
eliminate such conditions. 

Illuminated signs, parking lot lighting, building floodlighting or other exterior lighting shall be 
so designed and arranged that their collective result does not create so much light overspill onto 
adjacent premises that it casts observable shadows and so that it does not create glare from 
unshielded light sources. 

100 



Luminaires used primarily for sign illumination may be mounted at any height to a maximum of 
25 feet, regardless of lumen rating. 

The maximum height of the luminaire shall not exceed 25 feet. A maximum luminaire height of 
35 feet may be allowed by special permit from the Planning Board upon a finding that the 
increase in luminaire height will not negatively impact abutting properties, particularly property 
used or zoned for residential purposes. 

Internally illuminated signs on the premises shall collectively total no more than 15,000 lumens. 

No sign or building in any residential district or within 300 feet of any residential district if 
within sight from it shall be illuminated between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. unless 
indicating an establishment open to the public during those hours. 

Luminaires intended solely to illuminate any freestanding sign or the walls of any building shall 
be shielded so that its direct light is confined to the surface of such sign or building, and its 
lumen output shall be such that the average illumination on the ground or on any vertical surface 
is not greater than 0.5 footcandle or five lux. 

No flashing, moving or revolving lights shall be maintained. 

Exceptions. 

All temporary emergency lighting needed by the Police or Fire Departments or other emergency 
services, as well as all vehicular luminaires, shall be exempt from the requirements of this article. 

All hazard-warning luminaires required by federal regulatory agencies are exempt from the 
requirements of this article, except that all luminaires used shall be red and shall be shown to be 
as close as possible to the federally required minimum lumen output requirement for the specific 
task. 

Luminaires used to illuminate nighttime sporting events shall not exceed 35 feet. A greater 
luminaire height may be allowed by special permit from the Planning Board upon a finding that 
the increase in luminaire height will not negatively impact abutting properties, particularly 
property used or zoned for residential purposes. Such luminaires shall not be illuminated after 
11:00 p.m. 



Submission. The applicant for any permit under this section shall submit evidence that the 
proposed work will comply with this section. The submission shall contain, but shall not 
necessarily be limited to, the following: 



Plans indicating the location on the premises of each illuminating device, both existing and 
proposed. 

Description of all illuminating devices, fixtures, lamps, supports, reflectors, both existing and 
proposed. The description may include, but is not limited to, catalog cuts and illustrations by 
manufacturers (including sections where required). 

Photometric data, such as that furnished by manufacturers, or similar showing the angle of cut 
off of light emissions. 

101 



Definitions. The terms used in this Bylaw shall be defined as follows: 



DIRECT LIGHT— Light emitted directly from the lamp, off the reflector or reflector diffuser, or 
through the refractor or diffuser lens of a luminaire. 



FIXTURE— The assembly that houses the lamp or lamps, which can include all or some of the 
following parts: a housing, a mounting bracket or pole socket, a lamp holder, a ballast, a reflector 
or mirror and/or a refractor or lens. 



FLOOD OR SPOT LIGHT (or LUMINAIREV- Any light fixture or lamp that incorporates a 
reflector or a refractor to concentrate the light output into a directed beam in a particular 
direction. 



FULL CUTOFF— A luminaire designed with an opaque shield surrounding and extending below 
the lamp, such that no direct light is emitted above a horizontal plane. 



GLARE— Light emitting from a luminaire with an intensity great enough to reduce a viewer's 
ability to see and in extreme cases causing momentary blindness. 



HEIGHT OF LUMINAIRE— The vertical distance from the ground directly below the center 
line of the luminaire to the lowest direct-light-emitting part of the luminaire. 



LAMP- The component of a luminaire that produces light. 



LUMEN— A unit of luminous flux. One footcandle is one lumen per square foot; one lux is one 
lumen per square meter. For the purposes of this Bylaw, the lumen-output value shall be the 
initial lumen output rating of a lamp. 



LUMINAIRE— A complete lighting system; that is, a lamp (or lamps) and a fixture. 



OUTDOOR LIGHTING- The nighttime illumination of an outside area or object by any device 
located outdoors that produces light by any means. 



102 



UNDER ARTICLE 20 . Dwight Hayward moved to waive the reading of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. Robert Morse Chairman of 
the Master Plan Committee, explained the article. He explained that it has been four years since 
the last update was made to the Senior Living by-law. He cited the areas that would be 
addressed. Special permit process, RM zone standards, two times building height front set back, 
handicap adaptability vs acessibility. The by-law would add incentives for Building affordable 
Senior Housing. This would be for rental projects only, reduce open space requirment, allows up 
to six units per acre, half of all additional units must be affordable Senior housing (maintained by 
the Chelmsford Housing Authority. Under Independent Living Standards the maximun of two 
bedrooms, maximum habitable living area of 1600 square feet. Residential use allow in 
nonresidntial districts. In the LA (limited Industrial District) and all commerical districts. 

The Finance Committee had no recommendation on the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. Christopher Garrahan, Chairman of the Planning Board read the 
Board's recommendation. The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 27, 2000 on the above mentioned article after advertising a legal notice in the 
Lowell Sun on September 12, 2000 and September 19, 2000. A copy of the advertisement was 
sent to all abutting municipalities and the appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 40A, Section 5. The public hearing for this article was continued to the 
meeting on October 11, 2000. It is the Board's opinion the proposed article would promote the 
building of additional affordable senior living facilities within the town. Therefore, in keeping 
with the general intention of the zoning bylaw in the development of the community, the 
Planning Board voted unanimously (6-1) to recommend this article. The Moderator asked if 
there was any need to hear further debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands. Motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as follows: 



Robert Morse Chairman of the Master Plan Committee, moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Code, Chapter 195, Zoning, Article XVII Facilitated 7 Senior Living Facilities, by 
deleting Article XVII which reads: 



ARTICLE XVII 

Facilitated and Independent Senior Living Facilities 

§ 195-87. Purpose. 

Facilitated and independent senior living facilities are allowed in a variety of zoning districts by 
special permit from the Board of Appeals. The intent of this chapter is to provide the opportunity 
for the development of the types of multifamily and communal housing most beneficial for the 
senior and elder population of Chelmsford. 



A. Facilitated living facilities provide private or communal lodging for persons requiring 
limited medical attention or supervision and who ordinarily are ambulatory. These include, but 
are not limited to, assisted living facilities, Alzheimer's facilities and congregate living facilities. 



103 



B. Independent senior living facilities are intended to provide a safe, suitable age-restricted 
dwelling unit for a senior couple or individual who is able to live independently. Open space 
preservation is an important facet of independent senior living projects and is meant to provide 
the residents of the project with opportunities for active and passive recreation. 



§ 195-88. Dimensional standards. [Amended 10-21-1999 ATM by Art. 28] 

The following dimensional standards shall apply to facilitated and independent senior living 
facilities: 





RM 


CA 


CB 


CC 


CD 


CV 


IA 


Minimum lot area (acres) 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


3 


7 


Minimum lot width (feet) 


150 


125 


150 


200 


50 


50 


150 


Minimum lot depth (feet) 


150 


125 





200 








150 


Minimum frontage (feet) 


150 


125 


150 


200 


50 


50 


150 


Minimum front yard (feet) 2 


40 


20 


60 


60 


20 


20 


40 


Minimum side yard (feet) 


25 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


Minimum rear yard (feet) 


30 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


Minimum building separation (feet) 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


Maximum building coverage 


35% 


35% 


35% 


35% 


35% 


35% 


35% 


Maximum building height (feet) 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


Minimum open space, independent senior 
living 


10% 


30% 


30% 


30% 


30% 


30% 


30% 


Maximum number of units per acre, 
facilitated living 3 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


Maximum number of units per acre, 
independent senior living 4 


7 


4 


4 


4 


4 


7 


4 



NOTES: 

l A smaller lot size may be allowed by special permit from the Planning Board where such 
smaller lot is determined to promote the objectives of this article. 

Or twice the building height, whichever is greater. 



104 



3 Up to 10 units per acre may be allowed by special permit from the Planning Board where such 
increase is determined to promote the objectives of this article. 

4 Exclusive of open space requirements. Tract size minus open space requirement minus 
wetlands/floodplain not included in open space requirement times units per acre equals 
maximum number of units per tract. 

§ 195-89. General standards. 

A. The entire site shall be of a size and shape as shall provide a housing site that will be in 
harmony with the natural terrain and other features of the site and will preserve natural vistas and 
the character of the neighborhood. 



B. No site on a plan for which an approval is granted under this article may be subdivided so 
as to create additional lots. A notation to that effect shall be shown on the site plan. 



C. Sites abutting residentiary zoned land shall provide a landscaped buffer strip 50 feet in 
width or a strip as set forth in s. 195-43, whichever is larger, to provide adequate screening for 
adjacent properties. No structure, driveway, parking area or sidewalk shall be located in the 
landscaped buffer strip. A smaller buffer may be allowed by special permit from the Planning 
Board where such smaller buffer is determined to promote the objectives of this article. 



D. Driveways and parking areas within the development shall be constructed in accordance 
with Article V, Off-Street Parking and Loading. Sidewalks conforming to the Planning Board's 

subdivision rules and regulations shall be required by the Planning Board. * Additional 
requirements linking pedestrian circulation systems may be required by the Planning Board. 



E. Buildings shall be designed to be complementary in exterior design with each other and 
with the existing neighborhood in which the facility is located. Dwellings constructed under this 
article shall not be eligible for subsequent conversion to conventional apartments, with the 
exception of projects in the RM District. 



F. The method(s) of implementing age restrictions of seniors and elders must be to the 
satisfaction of the Board of Appeals and the Planning Board. 



G. The Planning Board may set additional site security and safety requirements as deemed 
necessary to ensure the security and safety of the residents of the facility. 



Jgditor's Note: See Ch. 202, Subdivision of Land. 



§ 195-90. Open space requirements. 

The minimum required open space set forth in s. 195-88 shall be contiguous open space, 
excluding required yards and buffer areas. Such open space may be separated by the road(s) 
constructed within the site. The percentage of the open space which is wetlands, as defined 
pursuant to MGL c. 131, s. 40, shall not normally exceed the percentage of the tract which is 

wetlands; provided, however, that the applicant may include a greater percentage of wetlands in 
the open space upon a demonstration that such inclusion promotes the purposes set forth in this 
Article XVII. 



The required open space shall be used for conservation, historic preservation and education, 
outdoor education, recreation, park purposes, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, or for a 
combination of these uses, and shall be served by suitable access for such purposes. 

The required open space shall remain unbuilt upon, provided that 10% of such open space may 
be paved or built upon for structures accessory to the dedicated use or uses of such open space, 
pedestrian walks and bike paths. 

Underground utilities to serve the site may be located within the required open space. 

The required open space shall, at the Planning Board's election, be conveyed to: 

( 1 ) The Town of Chelmsford or its Conservation Commission. 



(2) A nonprofit organization, the principal purpose of which is the conservation of 
open space and any of the purposes for such open space set forth above. 



A corporation or trust owned jointly or in common by the owners of lots within the site. If such 
corporation or trust is utilized, ownership thereof shall pass with conveyance of the lots in 
perpetuity. Maintenance of the open space and facilities shall be permanently guaranteed by 
such corporation or trust which shall provide for mandatory assessments for maintenance 
expenses to each lot. 



(a) Each such trust or corporation shall be deemed to have assented to allow the 
Town of Chelmsford to perform maintenance of the open space and facilities, if the trust or 
corporation fails to provide adequate maintenance, and shall grant the town an easement for this 
purpose. In such event, the town shall first provide 14 days' written notice to the trust or 
corporation as to the inadequate maintenance, and, if the trust or corporation fails to complete 
such maintenance, the town may perform it. The owner of each lot shall be deemed to have 
assented to the town filing a lien against each lot in the development for the full cost of such 
maintenance, which liens shall be released upon payment to the town of same. 



106 



(b) Each individual deed, and the deed or trust or articles of incorporation, shall 
include provisions designed to effect these provisions. Documents creating such trust or 
corporation shall be submitted to the Planning Board for approval and shall thereafter be 
recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 



Any proposed open space, unless conveyed to the Town or its Conservation 

Commission, shall be subject to a recorded restriction enforceable by the Town, 
provided that such land shall be perpetually kept in an open state, that it shall be 
preserved for exclusively agricultural, horticultural, educational or recreational 
purposes and that it shall be maintained in a manner which will ensure its suitability 
for its intended purposes. 

§ 195-91. Compliance with accessibility standards. 

A minimum of 33% of the units in a project shall comply with the Americans with Disabilities 
Act (ADA) accessibility standards to all living areas. 

and inserting the following: 

ARTICLE XVH 

Facilitated and Independent Senior Living Facilities 

§ 197-87. Purpose. 

Facilitated and independent senior living facilities are allowed in a variety of zoning districts by 
special permit from the Planning Board. The intent of the by-law is to provide the opportunity 
for the development of the types of multifamily and communal housing most beneficial for the 
senior and elder population of Chelmsford. The provision of senior affordable housing is an 
important goal of the bylaw. 



Facilitated living facilities provide private or communal lodging for persons requiring limited 
medical attention or supervision and who ordinarily are ambulatory. These include, but are not 
limited to, assisted living facilities, Alzheimer's facilities and congregate living facilities. 

Independent senior living facilities are intended to provide a safe, suitable age-restricted 
dwelling unit for a senior couple or individual who are able to live independently. Open space 
preservation is an important facet of independent senior living projects and is meant to provide 
the residents of the project with opportunities for active and passive recreation. 

§ 195-88. Dimensional standards. 

107 



The following dimensional standards shall apply to facilitated and independent senior living 
facilities: 





RM 


CA 


CB 


CC 


CD 


CV 


IA 


Minimum lot area (acres) 1 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


3 


7 


Minimum lot width (ft.) 


150 


125 


150 


200 


50 


50 


150 


Minimum lot depth (ft.) 


150 


125 





200 








150 


Minimum frontage (ft.) 


150 


125 


150 


200 


50 


50 


150 


Minimum front yard (ft.) 


40 


20 


60 


60 


20 


20 


40 


Minimum side yard (ft.) 


25 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


Minimum rear yard (ft.) 


30 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


Minimum building separation (ft.) 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


Maximum building coverage (%) 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


Maximum building height (ft.) 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


Minimum open space 
independent senior living (%) 4 





30 


30 


30 


30 


30 


30 


Maximum number of units per acre - 
facilitated living 2 


8 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


Maximum number of units per acre - 
independent senior living 


8 


4 3 


4 3 


4 3 


4 3 


7 


4 3 



A smaller lot size may be allowed by special permit from the Planning Board where such 
smaller lot is determined to promote the objectives of this Article XVII. 

2 " Up to 10 units per acre may be allowed by special permit from the Planning Board where 
increase is determined to promote the objectives of this Article XVII and shall meet the criteria 
of §195-91.1 

3 Exclusive of open space requirement. Tract size minus open space requirement minus 

wetlands/floodplain not included in open space requirement times units per acre equals 
maximum number of units per tract. Total may be increased to six units per acre by special 
permit from the Planning Board upon a finding that the density increase will not be detrimental 
to the intent of the bylaw and shall meet the criteria of § 195-91.1. 



May be partially or completely reduced by special permit from the Planning Board upon a 
finding that the reduction of the open space requirement will not be detrimental to the intent of 
the bylaw and shall meet the criteria of § 1 95-9 1 . 1 . 



§ 195-89. General standards. 



108 



The entire site shall be a size and shape as shall provide a housing site that will be in harmony 
with the natural terrain and other features of the site and will preserve natural vistas and the 
character of the neighborhood. 

No site on a plan for which an approval is granted under this section may be subdivided so as to 
create additional lots. A notation to that effect shall be shown on the site plan. 

Sites abutting residentially zoned land shall provide a landscaped buffer strip 50 feet in width or 
a strip as set forth in § 195-43, whichever is larger, to provide adequate screening for adjacent 
properties. No structure, driveway, parking area or sidewalk shall be located in the landscaped 
buffer strip. A smaller buffer may be allowed by special permit from the Planning Board where 
such smaller buffer is determined to promote the objectives of this Article XVII. 

Driveways and parking areas within the development shall be constructed in accordance with 
Article V, Off-Street Parking and Loading. Sidewalks conforming to the Planning Board 
Subdivision Rules and Regulations shall be required by the Planning Board. Additional 
requirements linking pedestrian circulation systems may be required by the Planning Board. 

Buildings shall be designed to be complementary in exterior design with each other and with the 
existing neighborhood in which the facility is located. Dwellings constructed under this section 
shall not be eligible for subsequent conversion to conventional apartments with the exception of 
projects in the RM District. 

The method(s) of implementing age restrictions of seniors and elders shall be to the satisfaction 
of the Planning Board. 

The Planning Board may set additional site security and safety requirements as deemed 
necessary to ensure the security and safety of the residents of the facility. 

Adaptability requirements for facilitated and independent senior living projects. 

All units shall be constructed to be handicap adaptable according to the standards of 
Section 504 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, 42 U. S. C. § 12204 and 
ANSIA117.1. 

Developments approved as rental projects shall not be converted to condominiums. 

§ 195-90. Open space requirements. 

The minimum required open space set forth in § 195-88 shall be contiguous open space, 
excluding required yards and buffer areas. Such open space may be separated by the road(s) 
constructed within the site. The percentage of the open space which is wetlands, as defined 
pursuant to MGL c. 131, § 40, shall not normally exceed the percentage of the tract which is 
wetlands; provided, however, that the applicant may include a greater percentage of wetlands in 
the open space upon a demonstration that such inclusion promotes the purposes set forth in this 
Article XVII. 

The required open space shall be used for conservation, historic preservation and 

education, outdoor education, recreation, park purposes, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, 
or for a combination of these uses, and shall be served by suitable access for such 

109 



purposes. 

B. The required open space shall remain unbuilt upon, provided that 1 0% of such open space 
may be paved or built upon for structures accessory to the dedicated use or uses of such 
open space, pedestrian walks and bike paths. 

C. Underground utilities to serve the site may be located within the required open space. 

D. The required open space shall, at the Planning Board's election, be conveyed to: 
( 1 ) The Town of Chelmsford or its Conservation Commission. 



(2) A nonprofit organization, the principal purpose of which is the conservation of 
open space and any of the purposes for such open space set forth above. 



(3) A corporation or trust owned jointly or in common by the owners of lots 
within the site. If such corporation or trust is utilized, ownership thereof shall pass with 
conveyance of the lots in perpetuity. Maintenance of the open space and facilities shall be 
permanently guaranteed by such corporation or trust which shall provide for mandatory 
assessments for maintenance expenses to each lot. 



(a) Each such trust or corporation shall be deemed to have assented to allow the 
Town of Chelmsford to perform maintenance of the open space and facilities, if the trust or 
corporation fails to provide adequate maintenance, and shall grant the town an easement for this 
purpose. In such event, the town shall first provide 14 days' written notice to the trust or 
corporation as to the inadequate maintenance, and, if the trust or corporation fails to complete 
such maintenance, the town may perform it. The owner of each lot shall be deemed to have 
assented to the town filing a lien against each lot in the development for the full cost of such 
maintenance, which liens shall be released upon payment to the town of same. 



(b) Each individual deed, and the deed or trust or articles of incorporation, shall 
include provisions designed to effect these provisions. Documents creating such trust or 
corporation shall be submitted to the Planning Board for approval and shall thereafter be 
recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 



Any proposed open space, unless conveyed to the Town or its Conservation 

Commission, shall be subject to a recorded restriction enforceable by the Town, 
provided that such land shall be perpetually kept in an open state, that it shall be 

110 



preserved for exclusively agricultural, horticultural, educational or recreational 
purposes and that it shall be maintained in a manner which will ensure its suitability 
for its intended purposes. 



§ 195-91. Independent living standards. 

All dwelling units and common areas shall be constructed to be handicap adaptable in 
accordance with Section 504 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, 42 U. S. C. § 
12204, ANSI Al 17.1 and the requirements of the Massachusetts Architectural Barriers Board. 

Units shall contain no more than two bedrooms. 

Units shall have a maximum habitable living area of 1,600 square feet. 

§ 195-91.1. Affordability standards for facilitated and independent senior living projects. 

The Planning Board shall only grant a density bonus for a project that provides rental units. The 
Planning Board may grant a density bonus upon a finding that such increase is determined to 
promote the objectives of Article XVII and according to one of the criteria listed below. Where 
there is more than one size or style of unit in a project the affordable units shall comprise the 
same percentage as market rate units. 

One-half of all additional units created through density bonuses shall be maintained as 
affordable units according to Department of Housing & Urban Development Section 8 Voucher 
Program or such other program agreeable to the Planning Board, Chelmsford Housing Authority 
and the applicant. The term "affordable" shall be as defined by the Massachusetts Department of 
Housing and Community Development for Chelmsford. 

A contribution pursuant to MGL c. 44, § 53A for the creation of units of senior and elder 
affordable housing. 

Such other method agreed to by the Planning Board and the applicant. 



And by amending Section 195-5, the Use Regulations Schedule, Category 9, Facilitated & 
Independent Senior Living, by deleting BA where it appears and inserting PB. 



UNDER ARTICLE 21. Mary Jo Griffin, Chairman of the School Committee, moved 
that the Town vote to accept the provisions of General Laws Chapter 71, Section 7 IF, to allow 
for the establishment of a revolving account by the School Committee for the purpose of 
depositing funds received for tuition payments for non-resident students and as state 
reimbursements for students who are foster care children. 



Ill 



The Town Manager explained that this will allow the School Department to set up a 
revolving fund in order to have access to the funds collected for titution of non resident students. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the 
article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands on the motion as amended, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 22. Barbara Scavezze moved that the Town vote to transfer and 
appropriate $12,000 from Free Cash remaining from FY00, or from the Waste Disposal line item 
of the Waste Collection budget, or any combination thereof; to enhance the position of Recycling 
Coordinator to a % FTE (full-time equivalent) under the Personnel Services line item of the 
Waste Collection budget, in order to allow the Town to apply for and manage Massachusetts 
recycling grants; or act in relation thereto. 



Barbara Scavezze explained that eight months ago she left the employment of the Town's 
Solid Waste Co-ordinator to take a job with the Massachusetts Environmental Protection 
Agency. Her hours and responsibilities were divided among other employees. It was the 
feelings of the recycling committee that the position is needed to be reinstated back to a one 
thirty hours a week employee. If the current costs for solid waste continue then the Town will 
face a shortfall in FY2006. The position is needed in order to maintain the enforcement of the 
program which if properly managed will save the Town money, seek grants to offset the costs 
involved with running the program, and come up with incentive ways to further encourage 
recycling, which comes by attending seminars and meetings. If an employee is not available to 
do these things, the Town could risk losing DEP funding. She asked for support of the article. 
David McLachlan asked the Town Manager if he felt that currently the program was adequately 
funded. The Manager felt that it was. Between his staff and the current solid waste employee, 
all programs and issues are being addressed. Barry Balan said he had opposed to the recycling 
program when first initiated years ago, but due to Barbara Scavezze efforts, he feels that her 
concerns and the committees are justified and urged for support. The Finance Committee was 
against the article. The Board of Selectmen were against the article. The Recycling Committee 
read a letter of support for the article. Mark Connors, Barry Balan, Steve Mallette, Liz Marshall, 
Peggy Dunn, all spoke in favor of the article. Leonard Richards asked the Town Manager who 
currently handles the grant process. The Manager explained that his assistant or other members 
of the staff, along with the Community Co-ordinator and solid waste personnel handle the 
research and paperwork. Jeffrey Stallard questioned if this money was added would the Town 
Manager have to reinstate the position. The Manager explained that he would not have to. 
Dennis Ready said that the Body should send a message to the Town Manager of being pro 
active and support of the program. The Moderator asked if there was any need for further 
discussion, hearing none, he asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 



Selectman Michael McCall moved to continue the Town Meeting due to the fact that the 
time was beyond the 1 1:00 PM curfew. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 3. Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
appropriate $750,000 from Free Cash for the reduction of the tax rate. 

112 






The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended 
the article. The Moderator asked if there was any need for debate, hearing none, he asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands on the motion, motion carried, unanimously. 



Seeing that there was no further business at hand to address, the Moderator declared the 
meeting adjourned sine die The meeting adjourned at 1 1 :30 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



113 



TOWN ELECTIONS 



Republican Primary Election March 4, 2000 





Prec 1 


Prec 2 


Prec 3 


Prec 4 


Prec 5 


Prec 6 


Prec 7 


Prec 8 


Prec 9 


TOTAL 


PRESIDENTIAL PREF 


Blanks 


1! 


2 


1: 


0! 


1 


4! 


1 


3 


3 


16! 


Alan Keyes 


7! 


10 


8 


11! 


20 


12! 


7 
171 


10 


16 


101] 


George W Bush 


151! 


88 


138: 


113 


145 


146 


165 


159 


1276 


Gary Bauer 


0: 


1 


2: 


0! 


1 


2! 





1 


1 


John McCain 


347 i 


241 


338 


295! 


359 


409! 


385 


365 


370 


3109! 


Steve Forbes 


5! 


2 


21 


0! 


4 


1! 




1 


1 





15^ 


Omn Hatch 


0! 


1 


0: 


1! 














3 


No Preference 


2! 


1 


0! 


0; 


1 


1! 


2 


2 


1 


10! 


Jesus (Write-in) 


0; 





0: 


0! 


1 


0! 











1! 


William Bradley (Write-in) 


0! 





0: 


0! 


1 


0; 









1 





1! 


Al Gore (Write-in) 


0: 




















1: 


Misc 


0: 








; 

















0: 


TOTAL 


513 


346 


489 


420 


533 


575 


567 


548 


550 


4541 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 5TH MLDSX 






















Blanks 


110 


106 


96! 


87! 


124 


120; 


103 


104 


114 


964 


Peter Dulchmos 


.; | 327 


190 


338 ^ 


267! 


324 375! 


408 

55 


375 


346 


2950 


Michael J.Regan 


76 


50 


55 


66: 


84 


79! 


68 


89 


622 


Wnte-ln 


0: 





0! 


0! 


1 


0! 





1 





2 


Misc 


: 





0i 


0! 





T 


1 





1 


3 


TOTAL 


513 


346 


489 


420! 


533 


575 


567 


548 


550 


4541 



STATE COMM WOMAN 5TH MLDSX 
Blanks 

Madeleine R Gelsinon 
Write-in 



219: 
289 



153 
192 



197 

292 



188 

230 

2 



233 
298 



213; 
359: 



226 

337 

2! 



225 

318 

1 



233 
312 

4i 



1887 

2627 

14: 



Misc 



TOTAL 



513 



489 



420 



533 



575 



2_ 

567 



1 



548 



550 



13J 

454T 



TOWN COMMITTEE 






















Group 


193 


117 


177 


147! 


190 


222 


245 


203 


224 


1718! 


Blanks 


10001! 


7485: 


9603: 


8589: 


10848, 


11205! 


9819: 


10540! 
272! 


10098 
282 


88188! 


John S. Fudge. Jr 


235! 


134: 


212! 


177 


221 


265! 


308 

300 


2106: 


Margaret A Fudge 


237 


135 


220 


180! 


225 j 


257 


266 


270 < 


2090 


Jeffrey A Brem 


227! 


131! 


216! 


177! 


249 


266 


280: 


244: 


258: 


2048: 


Lisa H Brem 


216! 


129! 


217! 


172! 


243 i 


263 


275 


239! 


256 1 


201 o: 


Richard F Burtt 


219: 


129! 


219: 


170! 


207 

223 


246! 

264 


281; 

293 


239! 

252 


252 
254 


1962 


Nancy P. Clark 


233 


145 


227 


175 


2066! 


Lincoln Clark III 


224! 


133: 


204! 


180! 


213 


247! 


278; 


240 


245 


1964: 


Carol C Cleven 


323 


182! 


287! 


225! 


323, 


349! 


384! 


340: 


347 ! 


2760! 


Walter A Cleven 


260: 


144! 


244! 


179! 


270 


296: 


332j 
270 


288 
229 


285! 


2298: 


Richard Codling 


211 


125: 


205 


162 


201 


240 


251 : 


1894 


John G Coppinqer 


226 


126! 


202! 


182: 


212' 


239: 


270 


242: 


259, 


1958! 


William C Cuny 


223: 


129! 


221: 


171! 


219* 


246! 


300 


265: 


258 


2032 


Matthew G Dulchinos 


238 


134 


207 


171! 


216 


256 
269 


308 

316 


260 

273 


265 
284 


2055! 


Peter Dulchinos 


244 


145 


229: 


179: 


229 


2168 


Philip M Eliopoulos 


276 


156: 


254! 


201! 


262 


313 


339! 


292: 


299! 


2392 


Bradford O.Emerson 


269 


151: 


248: 


200! 


274' 


309 


343: 


295! 


307! 


2396! 


Linda J. Emerson 


243 


137! 


230 : 


180 


251 


278 


301 


266 


276, 


2162: 





Prec 1 


Prec 2 


Prec 3 


Prec 4 


Prec 5 


Prec 6 


Prec 7 


Prec 8 


Prec 9 


TOTAL | 


Eileen K Fletcher 


240 


139! 


235! 


183: 


212 


276 


299 


269: 


264 


2117: 


JoanB Gutwein 


214 


125! 


202! 


167 


223 


238. 


275, 

281 


230 

233 


280 

252 


1954! 


Gerald L Hardy 


225 


131 


209 


170 


219 


258 


1978: 


Sheila M Hardy 


226: 


1361 


219! 


172 


219 


260! 


276 


241 


255 


2004 


Daniel E Lekas 


213! 


127j 


196 


160: 


206 


247! 


265: 


231! 


248 


1893: 


Fredericks Marcks 


219! 


124! 


206 


167: 


240 


243! 

250 


292! 

313 


240 : 

251 


270 

257 


2001: 


Michael F McCall 


227 


133 


247 


181! 


222 


2081 


MunelL W McGrann 


213 


127! 


199: 


164 


203 


238 


269! 


223! 


269 


1905! 


Constance A Pickard 


227! 


133! 


204! 


169; 


210 


248! 


276 1 


231! 


244 


1942! 


Patricia A Saber 


212: 


129: 


206! 


169! 


206 


238! 

229 


262 

262 


228 
218 


270 
247 


1920: 


ShaunF Saber 


205 


124! 


209 


162 


206 


1862 


Paul E Sarrategui 


216: 


122! 


193! 


171! 


204 


233 


260 


224 


254 


1877: 


Carol L Sneden 


216! 


128! 


211: 


179! 


221 


245! 


280 


237! 


262 


1979! 


David E Sneden 


215! 


124! 


202 


176 


219 


239! 

263 


279 
288 


241 

246 


262 

270 


1957: 


John B Sousa Jr 


236 


144: 


216! 


219 


226 


2108! 


Stuart G Weisfeldt 


272! 


156! 


269! 


204 


286 


314 


358 


312! 


307 


2478 


Joseph B Shanahan Jr 


250 


149! 


240! 


205! 


235 


289 


305: 


272! 


279 


2224! 


Marc F Levarn (Wnte-ln) 


3! 


0! 


3! 





2 


2: 
4! 


4 
3, 


6 
2 


5 

6 


25! 


Verton Lenfest (Wnte-ln) 


13 


61 


3 


11! 


10 


58: 


Susan G (Wnte-ln) 


11 


0! 


0! 


0! 





0: 





0: 





1! 


Jim Tobin (Wnte-ln) 


0! 


1! 


0! 


0! 





0! 


o 


0! 





1! 


Robert Gill (Wnte-ln) 


0! 


1: 





0! 





0! 







0! 






1 


1! 


Curtis Barton (Wnte-ln) 

















1 


Frenen (Wnte-ln) 





0! 


0: 


1! 











0! 





1! 


Lynn Havener (Wnte-ln) 


0: 


0! 


0! 


0! 





0! 


0: 


0! 


1 


1! 


Wnte-ln 




7 


0! 

11 


0: 
1! 


0! 
0: 









3 


O! 

1 


0! 

3 





0: 


MlSC 





16 


TOTAL 


17955 


12110 


17115 


14700 


18655 


20125 


19845 


19180 


19249 


158934 



114 



Democrat Primary Election March 4, 2000 



Prec 1 i Prec 2 



Prec3 



Prec 4 



Prec 6 



Prec 6 



Prec 7 



Prec 8 



Prec 9 TOTAL 



PRESIDENTIAL PREF 



Blanks 
Al Gore 



149! 



3 

187 



186: 



187 



250 : 



190 



196 



180 



26 



1713 



Lyn don H LaRouche, Jr 

M Bradley 

i No Preference 

Bush (write-in) 



149 



106 



136 



125 



160: 



191! 



168 



162 



149 



1346 



54 



i J ohn McCain (Write-in) 
'Barney_F_rank_ (Wnte-in) 



12 



I Gary Bauer [Write-in] 

Meghar i Sullivan (Write-in) 



j AlanKeves (Write-in) 



I Ral ph N ader ( Wri te-in) 
'Misc 



TOTAL 



353 i 



268 



333 



324 



356 



457 



367; 



368 



340: 



3166 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN 5TH MLDSX 



Blanks 



Thomas J Larkin 



Write-In 



Misc 



124; 



80 



228^ 



187 



95 



93 



238 



231 



124 



229 



TOTAL 



353' 



268 



333 



324 



2 

356 



158 



145 



297! 



222 



STATE COMM WOMAN 5TH MLDSX 

Blanks 

Janet M Beyer 

Carol Y Mitchell 

Write-In 

Misc 



134 

97 

121 



1 



69 



80 

119 





109 

105 

119 





TOTAL 



353 



268 



333 



93 

73 

158 



p_ 

324 



112 

122 

121 

1 



356 



457 

143 

142 

170 



2 

457 



115 



123 



1057 



249 



217i 



2098 



367 

143 

107 

117 





367 



368 

114 

104 

149! 

1 

0_ 

368 



340 

115 

94, 

131 



0_ 

340 



3166 

1032 
924 

1205 
2 
3 

3166 



TOWN COMMITTEE 




















Group 


135 


101 


125 


130 


145 


168 


139! 


130 


148 


1221 


Blanks 


6787 


5193 


6062 


5933 


6534 


8777 


6859 


7229 1 


5913 


59287 


John P. Emerson. Jr 


202 


145 


216 


202 


205 


253 


220; 


216 


199 


1858 


Adrienne M.Jerome 


154 


119 


169 


146 


165 


190 


165! 


155 


169 


1432 


r Samuel Poulten 


173 


122 


158 


165 


176 


225 


186; 


183! 


185 


1573 


Paul J. Cerqua 


147 


110 


147 


148 


164 


189 


163! 


151 i 


163 


1382 


Mary E. White 


165 


125 


158 


166 


176 


239 


175! 


166: 


171 


1541 


Arthur R Carmen 


144 


109 


145 


143 


156 


180 


155! 


147 


172 


1351 


Irene J. Cetaruk 


151 


119 


163 


148 


165 


192 


166: 


152 


166 


1422 


William FDalton 


213 


164 


208 


194 


200 


253 


192! 


213 1 


197 


1834 


Linda H. Dalton 


180 


146 


171 


161 


179 


222 


165! 


175! 


182 


1581 


Stratos G. Dukakis 


158 


121 


166 


154 


180 


221 


189: 


170 


178 


1537 


Grace M. Dunn 


168 


129 


177 


161 


179 


221 


179: 


174! 


184 


1572 


Kellie A. Dunn 


158 


122 


164 


159 


176 


213 


169! 


154; 


173 


1488 


Dorothy C. Aver 


150 


117 


147 


150 


167 


205 


165 


153 


167 


1421 


Loretta A. Gelenian 


152 


126 


150 


148 


164 


191 


168: 


150! 


165 


14l7 


Alexander W Gervais 


154 


118 


153 


146 


166 


191 


168 


164 1 


164 


1424 


Jason P. Hanscom 


144 


111 


152 


143 


157 


185 


153! 


144: 


163 


1352 




Prec 1 


Prec 2 


Prec 3 


Prec 4 


Prec 5 


Prec 6 


Prec 7 


Prec 8 


Prec 9 


TOTAL 


James M. Harrington 


184 


129 


168 


175 


181 


226 


187; 


180: 


194 


1624 


William A. Bennett 


159 


120 


153 


160 


167 


201 


158; 


154: 


175 


1447 


Gail E. Poulten 


156 


121 


155 


154 


174 


205 


176! 


161 


180 


1482 


Donald P. Ayer 


148 


113 


151 


148 


157 


204 


160. 


149: 


160 


1390 


Richard J. Jerome 


144 


110 


155 


140 


164 


183 


161 


145 


163 


1365 


.ScottE Johnson 


164 


112 


164 


173 


180 


213 


170; 


165 


182 


1523 


JoelM.Karp 


142 


111 


144 


147 


157 


189 


163 


150: 


160 


1363 


Yvette M. Lemire 


158 


113 


154 


144 


165 


191 


160! 


148: 


167 


1400 


Thomas EMoran 


171 


123 


177 


160 


177 


207 


172 


1661 


180 


1533 


Judith A. Olsson 


179 


126 


177 


168 


188 


252 


189; 


172! 


185 


1636 


Marianne J Paresky 


164 


120 


164 


154 


176 


200 


178; 


1621 


177 


1495 


Benari L.J. Poulten 


150 


113 


149 


147 


164 


193 


169 


155! 


169 


1409 


Cheryl M. Harris 


148 


114 


148 


144 


164 


186 


155! 


146 


163 


1368 
1453 


Anne T. Chicklis 


156 


122 


154 


145 


164 


196 


172! 


175 


169 


Dennis J. Ready 


178 


129 


168 


182 


205 


244 


242 


194! 


199 


1741 


Christos Simorellis 


158 


121 


165 


146 


183 


234 


182! 


166: 


176 


1531 


Angelo J.Taranto 


198 


142 


209 


202 


197 


280 


219; 


208 


201 


1856 


Barry T.Bell 


184 


142 


187 


176 


187 


239 


194; 


180 


183 


1672 


Martel (Write-in) 


1 

















0! 








1 


James Mazzola (Write-in) 


3 


1 


6 


4 





4 


0; 


-Si- 


._ 1 


25 


Dean L. Contover (Write-in) 








1 











0: 


OT 





1 


Sweeney (Write-in) 











1 

















1 


!Benoit (Write-in) 











1 








0! 


0^ 





1 


,Rines (Write-in) 











1 








0: 








1 


Verton Lenfest (Write-in Rep) 





1 








1 





0: 


0; 


2 


4 


iW. Porier (Write-in) 

















1 


0; 








1 


iGary Mouser (Write-In) 





o 














0; 


1. 





1 


i Judy Hass (Write-in) 




















1; 


0; 





1 


Miriam Hawking^ (Write-in) 























0! 


1 


1 


!Misc 


10 


1 





1 











1 


2 


15 


TOTAL 


12355 


9380 


11655 


11340 


12460 


15995 


12845 


12880 


11900 


110810 



115 



Libertarian Primary Election March 4, 2000 





! Prec 1 


Prec 2 


Prec 3 


Prec 4 Prec 5 


Prec 6 I 


Prec 7 


Prec 8 Prec 9 TOTAL I 


PRESIDENTIAL PREF 






Blanks 


0! 


o 


Oi 


OI 


Ol 


01 





Kip Lee 


0; 





Oi 


0| 


Oi 


01 


Oi Ol 


Harry Browne 


11 


1 


Oi 


oi oj 


1i 


3 ! 3l 10 


Edison P. McDaniels, Sr 


OS 





Oi 


Oi 


Ol 


Oi 


Oi 


Larry Hines 


Oi 





Oi 


OI 


Ol 


Oi 


oj Ol 


David Lynn Hollist 


0i 





Oi 


0! 


Ol 


0: 


Oi 


L. Neil Smith 
No Preference 
Write-in 
Misc 


o: 

Oi 
0; 









o: 




11 


Ol 




0! 

1! 


Oi 1 
1i 3 


0: 1 








Oi 





Oi 


Oi Oi 01 








Oi 


Ol 


Oi 





TOTAL 


1 


1 


0: 


11 1 11 


2 1 


3 4! 14 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 5TH MLDSX 












! 


Blanks 

Patrick El-Azem (Write-in) 


1 


1 


OI 


1l 1 1 


2: 


1 2 10 


0; 





Oi 


Oi OI 


Ol 


2 2 4 


Write-In 


0; 





Oi 


oi ol OI 


Oi 


Oi 


Misc 


0! 





Oi 


Oi o! o; 





Oi 


TOTAL 


1 


1 


oi 


ll II 1: 


Oi 


3 4 12 


STATE COMM WOMAN 5TH MLDSX 






! 


i i 






Blanks 


Oi 





Oi 


oi o oi 


Oi 


Ol Oi 


Laura Ei-Azem 


1i 


1 


o 


11 1 1l 


2! 


3 41 141 


Write-in 


Oi 





Oi 


oi ol ol 





Oi Oi 01 


Misc 


0: 








oj o; oi 





0: 01 


TOTAL 


1 


1 





ii 1| 1| 


2 


3 4 141 


TOWN COMMITTEE 

Blanks 

Edward B. Haynes 

William J. Woods 










3 


2 


oi 


2I 2 


Oi 


Ol 


2 11 


Oi 







Oi 





1! 


2 1 


3 3 9 

3 3 9 





Oi 


oi o 


11 


2 


Laura El-Azem 

Write-in 

Misc 

TOTAL 





1 


oi 


11 1 


- ___. 11 


2 


3 4 13 


OI 





OI 


0! 














OI 


o ! o oi 


Ol 





3 


3 


Oi 


3; 3: 3 : 


6 


9 12 42 



116 



Town Election April 4, 2000 



"Candidate for Re-election 



SELECTMAN 3 Year Term (?) 

Blanks 

William F Dalton* 



262 



341 



Philip M. Elioppulos* 
Write-in 



4 



350 




Misc 



Prec2 



Prec3 



Prec4 



Prec5 



Prec6 



Prec7 



Prec8 



Prec9 TOTAL 



133: 



243 



189; 



292 



170; 

2: 



303 

1 



222 



325 



317 
2 



TOTAL 





866 



310^ 



312: 



300 
345 



319 
316 



250 
299 



379 
01 



402 



436 
3 



345 
3 



1002 



2_ 
1076 



900 



504 

251 

307 



0_ 

1062 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 3 Year Term (1) 




















Blanks 


12: 
237 I 


6: 

145T 


16 


5 


6: 


16 
250; 


2 

189: 


13 

183: 


109 


Antony VVoIpe* 


209: 


247 


245 


202 


James B Trager 


228: 

1 


96 


195: 


181 S 


248 


257 




347 



251 
2 

1 


220 


Write-In 


0: 


0: 





2 


°l 


Misc 


0: 


0: 


0! 








1 









TOTAL 



478! 



247: 



420: 



433; 



524 



538 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE 3 Year Term (2) 

Blanks 

Stephen J Mallette" 

Carol L Sneden 



386; 



198 



339: 



333 



386 



391: 



419; 



315 



148; 



148 



223; 
277 



254 
277 



Write-in 
Write-in 



296 
319 



335 
321 



336 
320 



291 
293 



Misc 



TOTAL 



m 

494; 



1002 



1048 



1076 



575 

234 

251 

2 







LIBRARY TRUSTEE Unexp l^earjerm (1) 

Blanks 

Kevin E. Porter 

Daniel E Lekas 



Steven PL. .Majpney. 

Writejn 

Misc 



: 


77: 

121: 


64 


91 i 


84 


88; 


104 




56 ^ 


120 


106 


171: 


132 




78: 


50: 


75! 


69 


61: 


104 




200; 


77: 


131: 


172 


181; 


184[ 




11 


0: 








0: 


0' 



87 

223 
62 



80 

124 
75 



165 
_ j 

OL 



170 




207 

112 

77 

1 34 - 

1 





TOTAL 



478 



247; 



420: 



524: 



538 



450 



531 



2543 

2670 

3009 

11 

11 
8244 

185 

1907 

2023 

5 

2 

4122 

3342 

2386 

2505 

5 



6 

8244 



1165 

651 

1414 

3 

7 



4122 



BOARD OF HEALTH 3 Year Term (1) 


















258 

272 

1 




1280 

2829 

5 

8 


Blanks 


123: 
354; 


67; 


104 


125, 


147 


160 : 


173 

361 


123 
325 


Douglas E Hausler* 


179; 


314: 


308: 


354 


362, 


Write-in 


0: 

1: 


11 


0] 


0! 


0; 


1 


2: 
2 




2: 


Misc 


0: 


2; 


°l 


0! 


1 - 



478 



247; 



420: 



433 



501 



524 



538 



450 



531 



4122 



PLANNING BOARD 3 Year Term (3) 












585 


579 
362 


458 
299 




Blanks 


519 


248 


467 


450 


554 


932 


Pamela L Armstrong 


297: 


165: 


270: 


295 


327: 


338 


239 


James P Good" 


322: 


161: 


265: 


284 


313: 


332 


345 
327 


303 
289' 


218 


KimMacKenzie* 


295: 


167 


253! 


270 


309: 


315; 


203 


Write-in 


1 


Oi 


0! 





0: 





0: 

0; 


0: 
0: 





Write-in 





0: 


O: 





0; 









Misc 



TOTAL 

SEW ER COMMISSION 3 Year Term (1) 
Blanks 

George F Abely* 
Write-in 
Misc 



1434 



741: 



1260; 



1299: 



1503 



2_ 

1572 



1 
1350 



138 

339; 
1| 



178: 

6: 



103 ; 

317 

0i 



126 

307 





171 
329 

1] 

0: 



157j 

364 

2 

1, 



197 

341 







123 

326 



1 



259 

270 

2 



531' 



4792 

2592 

2543 

2428 

1 



10 



12366 



1343 

2771 

6 

2 

4122 

1163 
2947 

6 

6 

4122 



TOTAL 



478: 



247! 



420: 



433; 



501 



524: 



538 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 5 Year Term (1) 


Blanks 


126: 


66: 


114 


122 


144 


158 


155 
383 


122 
326 1 


156 


Denise Marcaurelle* 


351 i 


181; 


302: 


311 


355! 


365 


373 


Write-in 


11 
0: 





2! 





0: 


0: 
1 


0: 
0; 


1; 
V 


2 


Misc 


0: 


21 





2 






478 



247: 



420; 



433- 



501 



524 



538 



450 



HOUSING AUTHORITY Unexp 1 Year Term 
Blanks 



(1) 



144; 



73 



115: 



1261 



155: 



167 



192 



Leonard E Westgate 
yyrite-ln 

Misc 



TOTAL 



333; 

1 

0^ 

478: 



174: 

b; 



300: 
3 
2 



306 j 

0; 
1_ 



247: 



420 



433 



345: 
0; 

1. 

501 



356 


jT 

524 



346 



538 



126 



321 
1 
2 



159 

370 

2 





CEMETERY COMMISSION 3 Year Term (1) 










I 




176: 






Blanks 


132; 


71: 


111: 


123 


148; 


151 


124 


159 


Jean R. McCaffery* 


346; 


176 


307 


310 


352! 


372I 


362 




324; 


369 


Write-in 


0: 


0: 


1! 





11 





1 


2 


MiSC 


0: 


0: 


1! 








n 


0' 


1 


1 



TOTAL 



478 



247; 



420: 



433 



501 



524 



538 



450 



531 



1257 

2851 

7 

7 

4122 

1195 

2918 

5 

4 

4122 



117 



Republican State Primary September 19, 2000 



Pred 



Prec2 



Prec3 



Prec4 



Prec5 



Prec6 



Prec7 



Prec8 



Prec9 



TOTAL 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Blanks 

:JackE. Robinson, III 

Write-in 

Mlsc 



20 

47 
3] 
0] 



TOTAL 



70 



2v 
1 


30 



16 

34 

2 



52 



8: 

23; 

2 

of 

33 



15 



32 
2 


49 



20 

32: 



2; 

_0_ 
54 



is; 

29; 

1 

0: 

48 



54 



140 
295 

16: 

ol 



451 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Dlst 
'Blanks 



35 



17 



28 



17 



20 



41 



28 



34 



34 



254 
169 



' M arc L. L aplante 



27 



12 



20 



13 



29 



18 



19 



25 



: Write-in 



Misc 



TOTAL 



30 



33 



49 



54 



54 



COUNCILLOR 3rd District 



Blanks 



63 



27 



50 



32 



47 



47 



48 



54 



56 



19] 

451 



424^ 



Write-in 



Misc 



TOTAL 



30 



52 



33 



49 



54 



54 



TOTAL 
I CLERK OF COURTS Mldsx Cty 

' Blanks 
Write-in 
Misc 



70 



30 



TOTAL 



28 
2 




52 


33 


49 


54 


48 


54 














51 : 


32 


48 


49 


46 


53 





1j 








1 


1 


1 


0! 


1 


5 


1 


0, 



30 



52 



33 



49 



54 



54 



21 
451 



SENATOR IN GEN COURT 5th Mldsx Dist 

Blanks 


15 


7 


16! 










13 


6; 


91 


1! 


7 


15; 


11; 


Andrew B.Pryor 


55! 


23 


36! 


32; 


42 


39; 


37; 


39 


54 


357 


Wnte-ln 

















0I 





2 


1 


3 


Misc 








0; 


0; 





0' 


0] 





o 





TOTAL 


70 


30 


52 


33 


49 


54 


48 


54 


61 


451 


REP IN GEN COURT 16th Mldsx Dist 


















I 




Blanks 


19: 


9; 


10 : 


12: 


7 


9: 


10; 


8 


13; 


97 


Carol C. Cleven 


46: 


20: 


41: 


19; 


38 


44i 


36; 


44 


47; 


335 


Anthony Volpe (write-in) 


3i 


°i 


0! 


1] 


4 


Ol 


0; 





0: 


8 


Write-in 


2i 


1 


11 


1i 





0; 


0; 


2 


0^ 


7 


Misc 











0: 





1 


2 





1 


4 



451 ; 



57 


426 


0; 


9 


4 


16 


61 


451 



REGISTER OF DEEDS 










429 


Blanks 




61 


29 


51 j 


32 


48 


52 


47 


53: 


56 


■Write- In 




3 


1 


0; 


1 








1; 








6 


Misc 




6 





1 





1 


2 





1 


5 


16 




TOTAL 


70 


30 


52 


33 


49 


54 


48 


54 


61 


451 


REGISTER OF PROBATE Mid: 






















Blanks 




19 


7 


7! 


7; 


13 


12; 


6; 


12; 


9: 


92 
353 


! Lee Johnson 




51 


23 


44; 


26! 


36 


40; 


41 1 


40j 


52 ; 


Wnte-ln 




Ol 





1! 


0; 





2: 


1; 


2! 





6 


Misc 




0; 





0: 


0; 






















TOTAL 


70 


30 


52 


33 


49 


54 


48 


54 


61 


451 



118 



Democrat State Primary September 19, 2000 





Pred 


Prec 2 


Prec 3 i 


Prec 4 


Prec 5 


Prec 6 


Prec 7 


Prec 8 


Prec 9 


TOTAL 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 


24 
















26 


225 


Blanks 


10 


25 


19 


23 


35 


38 


25 


Edward M Kennedy 


125; 


54: 


93! 


122 


70 


165! 


71 


107! 


56 


863 


Write-In 


3: 


3! 


0! 


3! 





0! 


2 


3! 


3 


17! 


Mlsc 





0! 


1! 


2: 





1! 





0: 





4; 


TOTAL 


152 


67 


119 


146 


93 


201 


111 


135 


85 


1109 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Dist 


9 


1 






: 


f 


4 


4 


1 


33 


Blanks 


ll 


4 


2 


Martin T. Meehan 


112 


54 


80 


1111 


65! 


148 


73 


102! 


55 


800 


Joseph F Osbaldeston 


7! 


5! 


15: 


8! 


6! 


8! 


13i 


14 


8T 


84 


Thomas P. Tierney 


22! 

1 


4j 


21 


23! 


20 : 


38! 


21 1 


15: 




18i 

3 


182: 

8 


Marc L. Laplante ( Rep Write-in Cand) 


3 


1! 


0: 





0! 





Misc Write-in 


1 


0] 


1 


0! 





0! 


0; 


0! 





2: 


TOTAL 


152 


67 


119 


146 i 


93 i 


201: 


111 


135! 


85: 


1109: 



COUNCILLOR 3rd District 


Blanks 


42; 


15! 


27 


24! 


26 


43; 


38 


38 


.._. 28 


281: 


Marilyn M Petitto Devaney 


70! 

38 


45; 

6 


68! 


92; 


42 


127! 


47 


74 


32 


597: 


Ruth E. Nemzoff 


24 


29 


25 


31 


26 


23 


25 


227 


Write-in 


2 








0! 














0: 


2 


Misc 





1i 


0! 


1! 

















2! 


TOTAL 


152 


67: 


119: 


146 


93 


201 


111 


135 


85 


II 09 


SENATOR IN GEN COURT 5th Mldsx Dlst 


36 


20! 












30; 


22 




Blanks 


24! 


25 


23 


43 


_38; 


261 


Susan C Fargo 


110! 


45: 


95! 


118: 


68 


158! 


72 


104! 


60 : 


830 


Write-in 


4! 


2! 


0! 


1! 


1 


0! 


1 


1! 


ll 


11 


Misc 


2 


: 


O] 


2 


1 











2 


7! 


TOTAL 


152 


67 


119 


146 


93 


201 : 


111 


135 


85 


1109 



REP IN GEN COURT 16th Mldsx Dist 


140 






i 






125 


77 




Blanks 


62! 110: 


133! 


87! 


190 


106 


1030 


Anthony Volpe (write-in) 


0! 


0! 0! 


0! 





0! 





2! 


0! 


2! 


Write-in 


3: 


5 4 


5] 


1 


3! 


3 


4! 


8 


36: 


Misc 


9! 


5! 


8! 


5j 


8: 


2 


4! 





41! 


TOTAL 


152 


67: 119: 


146 


93 


201 


111 


135 


85 


1109 


CLERK OF COURTS Mldsx Cty 


40; 






. 








20 




Blanks 


14; 23: 


25! 


26 


34 


26 


32 


240! 


Edward J Sullivan 


87! 


38 75 


93! 


51! 


135 


59 


81! 


46 


665; 


Dennis Michael Sullivan 


23! 


15; 211 


27! 


16 


32! 


26 


22! 


18 1 


200 : 


Write-in 


1j 

1 


0! 0! 


0! 





0! 





0! 
0! 


1 



2! 


Misc 


51 


II 





0! 





2: 


TOTAL 


152 


67: 119 


146! 


93 


201 


111 


135 


85 


1109 


REGISTER OF DEEDS 


















Blanks 


39; 


16! 25! 


18! 


34! 


54 


43 


24 


26' 


279! 


Richard P. Howe. Jr 


111 f 

1 


50 94 


126! 


59] 


146! 


68 


111! 


59 



824 


Write-in 


1 0: 


















2 


Misc 


1 


01 


2: 


; 


1; 








4 


TOTAL 


152: 


67! 119: 


146! 


93: 


201 


111 


135 


85 


1109! 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY SEPTEMBER 19, 2000 



Precl 



Prec 2 



Prec 3 



Prec 4 



Prec 6 



Prec 6 



Prec 7 



Prec 8 



Prec 9 TOTAL 



REGISTER OF PR OBAT E Mldsx Cty (fill vac) 

Blanks,- 

Dean J Bruno 
JohnR.Buonomo 

Thoma s B. Concannon, Jr. 

Tara DeCnst ofaro 
Francis X Flaherty 
Melissa J Hurley 
Ro bert Wesl ey Keough 



10 



L.PaulLucero 



Ed McMahon 
MiscWnte-in 



TOTAL 



63f 

V 

152 



20 



10 
14: 



35 


67 



57; 

CM 

119 



83 

0: 
146; 



29 



13: 



161 



12 



4 32 

8 32 

2 41 



120! 

1| 

201! 



62; 

0; 

135 



20 
538 
_2 
1109 



119 



Libertarian State Primary September 19, 2000 



Pr»e1 Pr»c2 Pr»c3 Pr*c4 Pt»c5 Pre<6 Prec7 Pr*e8 Prse9 TOTAL 



SE\i - :- '. ::*.3R=ss 



Zb-.l - -;,■ - 



16 



t ',-:f-r 




ft 


n 





n 




















m;: 






Q 




o 




o 


; 


o 


_" 


* 




""A- 


i 


; 






2 




1 




5 


•f 



=5==5 = s = '-i-.= S ::s3R=SS5r = r 



:_. 



•5 



'■'•a-:, .i: ;ir = s: .-.--- :=r>: 



ktsc 



•I 





s=v.~:~ •• :•=-. ::.":- v :si : r 



,*,- *^_ r 



- i_ 



RS»WGBiCOUKI Will 

PsnckE-Azsn 



16 

; 
•-: 



3 

13 

: 



ms-: 



CLB3K OF COURTS MMa Oy 



•6 



.-,-- f .r 



_ : _ i_ 



=-=:- s == :- z==rs 



^5 

: 



Ms-: 




; 


: 


: 








; 


; 




: 


-:--. 




3 


: 






j 




z 




s 


M 


==;- s~= : r ==.: = -~ >.' : 


BdyfBrac) 






















State 




3 


; 










2 




5 


16 


A- ~r 




: 


; 











: 


: 


Q 








s: 




; 


; 


- 


o 


c 


: 


: 


A 


3 





-: _ i_ 




3 








: 


■ 


z 




C 


' : 



State Election November 7, 2000 



120 



'Ovefiin ballots adjusted 11117100 
























Prec r 


Prec2 


Pr.c3 


Prec 4 


Prec 5' 


Prec 6 


Prec 7' 


Pr«c8 


Pit-. S 


TOTAL 


PRESIDENT & VICE PRESIDENT 


Banks 


38 


16 


13 


16 


21 


26 


19 


24 


39 


212 


Browne & Oliver (Libertarian)^ 


15! 


15 


9 


16 


15 


18 


9 


17 


18 


133 


Buchanan & Higgins. Sr (Reform) 
Bush & Cheney (Repubican) 
Gore & Lieberman (Democratic) 


11! 

813 

1006 


1 
524 
906 


104! 


11! 
804 

1051 

3 

119 


11 

679 

926 

3 

96 


7 

812 

1045 

2 

133 


7 

840 

1077 



118: 


6 

878 

1040 

3 

ii-il 


4 

819 

983 

3 

86" 


8 

828 

944 

5 

116 


67 

6887 

8978 

21 

891 


Hagehn & Tompkins (Unenrolled) 


2 


Nader 8. LaDuke (Ma Green Parry) 


108; 


Reynolds & Hols (Write-in Candidates) 





o; 











0! 


0! 








; 


Write-in 


2! 




6 


2 


2 


4! 
3 : 


0' 
5' 


3 


2 


23 


MlSC 














2 


1 





11 


TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2C16 


1749 


2039 


2093 


2071 


1940 


1962 


17433 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 










54 
1300 
333 


118 
1367 
323 


102 
1305 
314 


97 
1251 
289 




Blanks 


126 


69 
1072; 


81 
1335 


113 
1071 
280 


119 
1190 
330 


919! 

11147 


Edward M Kennedy 


1256 


Caia A Howe! 


303 


212 


318 


2702 
2262! 


Jack E Robinson ■ 


271 


186 


229 


239 


259 


237: 


315! 


247 


278 


Dale E Fnedgen 
Philip Hyde. 11 


11! 

2; 


7i 

3! 


12 
4 


8 
5! 


10 

7 


10! 
6! 


4! 
3! 


12 
5 


7 
4 


81! 

39: 


Philip F Lawler 
Write-in 


25! 

1 


18! 

1 


36 

1 


32 

1 


34 
1 


30! 

o! 


26! 

2! 


37 

2 


31 
2 


268! 
11 


tvtsc 














1 


2 


0! 








3 


TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2016 


1749 


2:39 


2093 


2071 


1940 


1962 


'7433 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Oi«t 






















Blanks 


477 
1476 


303 
1230" 


444 
1524 


437 
1256 


459 
1525 


454 
1589 


506 
1507 


477 


484 


4041: 

12962 


Martin T Meehan 


1433 


1422 


MarcLaplante 


2 


2 


2 


40 


19 
30 


2 

20 


1 







25 


Write-in 


9: 




13 


36! 


30 




234 


MlSC 


31 


14 


33 


15 


15 


28 


21! 





14 


171 


TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


20-6 


1740 


2039 


2093 


2071 


1940 


i 362 


•7433 


COUNCILLOR 3rd District 
Btanks 


584! 


370 ! 


548 


518 


588 


549 


656: 


571 


572 


4956! 


Marian M Peono Devaney 
Barry T Hutch 


1121: 
284! 


1000! 
194! 


1192 
269 


984 
243! 


1154 
281 


1241 
299! 


1128! 
282 


1129 
236 


1089 
294 


10038 
2392! 


Write-in 


0! 


3: 


2 


2 




6 


0: 

4 


5! 

0: 


2 






MlSC 


6 


1 


5 


2 


2 


4 


30! 


TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2093 


2071 


1340 


1962 


17433 


SENATOR IN GEN COURT 5th Mldsx Dlst 


192 






175 


154 


182 
1341 


•51 
1150: 


157 
1214 


166 
1094 


1493 
10695 


Blanks 


134 


182 


Susan C Faroo 


1202 


1043 


1302 


1055 


1294 


Andrew B. Pryor 


599: 


390 


530 


517! 


589 


570 ■ 


769 


568 


702 


5234! 


Write-in 


1! 





0, 


1 


1 


0! 


0! 


1 





4 : 


MlSC 


1 


1 


2 


1 


' 


J 


1 








7! 


TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2016 


1748 


2039 


2093 


2071 


1340 


1962 


17433 


STATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 7. 2000 




Pred 


Prec 2 


Prec 3 


Prec 4 


Prec 5 


Prec6 


Prec 7 


Prec8 


Prec 9 


TOTAL 


REP IN GEN COURT 16th Mldsx Dltt 








170 


190 


181 ' 


138 1 


187 


172" 




Blanks 


209 


178 


197 


1622 



CarolC Cleven 

Patrick ELAzem 

Write-in 

Misc 



1393 

387 



1082 
304 



1458 

357 



1162 

415 



1435 
412 



1537 
367 

2 



1614: 

314 s 



1416 

332 



1373 

413 



12470 

_330V 

23! 

17! 

17433 



CLERK OF COURTS Mldtx Cty 






















aorta 

Edward J Sutrvan 


614! 

1362! 


415! 
1143! 


603 
1389 


568 

1168 


658 
1367 


613 
1454! 


686 
1360! 


615 

1315: 


710 
1235 


5492! 
11804! 


Write-* 
Msc 


2: 

17 


5! 

5 


6 

8 


6 

6 


8 

■: 


13: 

13 


4! 
11 


2i 

8 


8 

9 


55: 
82 





TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2C16 


1749 


2039 


2093 


2971 


134C 


1962 


17433 


REGISTER OF DEE 


DSMIdsx Northern Dis 








542 


641 

1388 

5 


605 

1466 

8 : 


658 

1401 

SI 








Btanks 


605 


413 


589 


602 
1324 


669 
1275 


5324 
11984! 


Richard P Howe Jr 






1148 


1414 


1185 
! 


Write-in 




1 


6 


2 


2 


9 


45 


Misc 




14! 


3 


11 


5 


5 


14 


7! 


12 


9 


80 




TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2093 


2071 


1940 


1962 


17433 


REGISTER OF PRO 


BATE Mldtx Cty (till vac) 






















Blanks 


388 


295 


413 


393 


460 


428: 


432! 


377 


436 


3632! 


JohnR Buonomo 
Lee Johnson 




575! 

526! 

483! 

1: 


519! 
323' 


607 
452 


519 
388 


526 
488 


579 
516! 


508! 
582 


562 
488! 


474 
536 


4869: 
4318! 


Diane Poutos Harpel 
wnte-m 


429! 
1 


537 
3 


434 
1 


562 
2 


566! 

3! 


548: 
0! 


499 
1 


514 



4582! 
12! 


MlSC 




2 


1 


4 


4 


1 


1 


Ij 


3 


2 


19! 




TOTAL 


1995! 


• 568 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2093 


2071 


1940 


1962 


17433 


QUESTION 1 


Blanks 




141 


77 


93 
1446 


82 
1257 


91 
1468 


115: 
1528 
450* 


78 

1606: 

387 


106 
1356 
478 


78 
1450 


861! 
12608 


Yes 




1411 


1076 


NO 




443 


415 


477 


410 


480 


424 


3964 




TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


20'6 


1749 


2039 


2093. 


2071 


134C 


1962 


17433 


QUESTION 2 
























Blanks 




105 


481 


53 


48 


46 


83 


40 


68! 


44 


533 


Yss 
No 




1363 
527 


1088! 
422 


1452 

511 


1300 

403 


1449 
544 


1451: 

559 


1522! 
509 


1372 

500 


1408 

510 


12415! 
4485 




TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2093! 


2071 


1940 


1962 


17433: 


QUESTION 3 

Btanks 




91: 


38: 


51 


47 


46 


80 


46! 


72! 


49 


521 


Yes 
No 




943 
961 


758! 
770 


934 
1031 


822 
880 


1014 
979 


968 
1045 


990: 
1035! 


895 
973 


966 

947 


8291 
8621 




TOTAL 


•995 


1568 


2016 


1749 


2239 


2C93 


2071 


'94C 


1962 


17433 


STATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 7, 2000 






Pred 


Prec 2 


Prec3 


Prec4 


PrecS 


Prec6 


Prec7 


Prec 8 


Prec 9 


TOTAL 


QUESTION 4 
























Blanks 




97! 


36 


47 


44 


43 


79! 


47! 


68 
1285 
577 


43 

1390 
529 


504 
11732! 
5197! 


Yes 
NO 




1308! 

590! 


1039 
493 


1384 
585 


1153 
552 


1372 
624 


1371 
643 


1420! 

604: 




TOTAL 


1995: 


1568! 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2: 9 3 


2071 


194C 


1962 


17433! 


QUESTION 5 
Btanks 




122! 


58: 


84 


74! 


79 


114! 


84- 


80' 


72 


778! 


Yes 


790: 
1083 


640! 


792 


672 
1003 


784 
1176 


762: 
1217 


718: 

1269 


734 
1116 


751 
1139 


6643! 

10012! 


No 




869 


1140 




TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2033 


2071 


1340 


1362 


•7433 


QUESTIONS 








64 


63 


63 
927 
1049 


98 


63 


79 






Btanks 




107: 


52 


60 


649 


Yes 




891 


705 
811! 


923 
1029 


773 
913 


929 
1066 


875: 
1133! 


816 

1045 


944 
958 


7783 
9001 


No 




997: 




TOTAL 


1995 


'568 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2093 


2071 


1940 


1962 


17433 


QUESTION 7 


Btanks 
Yes 




121! 
1375! 


45! 
1132! 


77 

1422 


64 
1227! 


62 
1496 


116! 

1527 


61 
1631 


82 
1420 


57 
1472 


685 
12702! 


No 




499 


391 


517 


458 


481 


450 


379: 


438 


433 


4046 




TOTAL 


1995 


1568 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2093 


2071 


1940 


1862 


17433 


QUESTIONS 


Btanks 
Yes 


41 


116 

878 


54 

725 


71 

818 


71 
689 


81 
885 
1073 


95 
847 


67 
813: 


90 
822 


70 
855 

1037 


715: 

7332 
9386 


No 




1001 


789 


1127 


989 


1151 


1191 


1028 




TOTAL 


-995 


1568 


2016 


1749 


2039 


2033 


2071 


1940 


1962 


'-432 



121 



3 1480 00942 9660